RR: it's all comming back to me now

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Technician, May 20, 2003.

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  1. Technician

    Technician Guest

    Well, i haven't rode anything new for trails. just a quick 1 mile ride around Flint Woods.

    But the exciting part is, i do belive i have crossed the line between being out of shape, and
    remembering that it is merely Lactic acid that needs burning off. I rode the mile, despite the heavy
    80 degree heat, and not once did i have to stop to rest. well, that isn't entirely true, i came
    across very large elderly outing group that i stopped and allowed to pass, so i guess that can be a
    break, though i only went about 100 feet. and i hardly even noticed the camel bak. i finally got it
    shaped right so it fits perfectly. the only time i noticed it was when i took sips, and when i hit a
    bump and the tube flew up and hit me in the face. And after the ride, i was still full of energy (it
    was after all only a
    mile). looks like i am well on my way back to long endurance. and the leg muscles are gaining their
    strength back, and losing their layer of fat (if only the mid section would do the same). I'm
    planning another 40 mile endurance ride in the future. enough of those and the mid section
    should be fairly clear of unwanted fat. then i can take longer trips to see just how far i can
    go. and i also have plans to re-visit Mt Appitite park in Auburn. that was a fun trail, and
    pictures will be a must. that is one trail that if anybody came to visit/ride, i would lead
    them there (only 45 miles away from farmington). but i will have to save that trail as a new
    job celebration as the gas alone in my car would cost more than i currently have.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
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  2. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Tue, 20 May 2003 19:14:57 -0400, Technician wrote:

    > and i hardly even noticed the camel bak. i finally got it shaped right so it fits perfectly. the
    > only time i noticed it was when i took sips, and when i hit a bump and the tube flew up and hit me
    > in the face.

    My old 'bak was one of the first models, with no horizontal straps to connect the shoulder straps
    together. On steep downhills, it had a crazy way of trying to work its way over one shoulder. It was
    always an odd feeling to have my Camelback rubbing my ear! The darn thing still works - in fact, I'm
    using its bladder as a replacement while Camelbak contemplates replacing the NEW bladder.

    > And after the ride, i was still full of energy (it was after all only a
    > mile). looks like i am well on my way back to long endurance. and the leg muscles are gaining
    > their strength back, and losing their layer of fat (if only the mid section would do the
    > same). I'm planning another 40 mile endurance ride in the future.

    "Another"? So you've done one already? Gee, a mile should be a piece of cake! If not...well, I don't
    see the purpose of a 40-mile ride other than just to see how much pain you can endure. 10-15 milers
    are fun and I can still have control of bodily functions aftward.

    > is one trail that if anybody came to visit/ride, i would lead them there (only 45 miles away from
    > farmington).

    Funny, the first time I read that I thought it said "I would LEAVE them there"!

    > but i will have to save that trail as a new job celebration as the gas alone in my car would cost
    > more than i currently have.

    Hey, something to look forward to (can you tie that tie yet?)

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  3. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Tue, 20 May 2003 19:14:57 -0400, Technician wrote:
    >
    > > and i hardly even noticed the camel bak. i finally got it shaped right so it fits perfectly. the
    > > only time i noticed it was when i took sips, and when i hit a bump and the tube flew up and hit
    > > me in the face.
    >
    > My old 'bak was one of the first models, with no horizontal straps to connect the shoulder straps
    > together. On steep downhills, it had a crazy way of trying to work its way over one shoulder. It
    > was always an odd feeling to have my Camelback rubbing my ear! The darn thing still works - in
    > fact, I'm using its bladder as a replacement while Camelbak contemplates replacing the NEW
    > bladder.
    >

    Yeah, i heard they last a good long time. should be worth my investment from what people
    seem to say.

    > > And after the ride, i was still full of energy (it was after all only a
    > > mile). looks like i am well on my way back to long endurance. and the leg muscles are gaining
    > > their strength back, and losing their layer of fat (if only the mid section would do the
    > > same). I'm planning another 40 mile endurance ride in the future.
    >
    > "Another"? So you've done one already? Gee, a mile should be a piece of cake! If not...well, I
    > don't see the purpose of a 40-mile ride other than just to see how much pain you can endure. 10-15
    > milers are fun and I can still have control of bodily functions aftward.
    >

    i was counting last year, this year i have not yet worked up the guts to try it again. just about
    killed me last year, but after i did it, no trail seemed too long. it was more or less a baseline
    for what i could
    do. it is all on a abandoned railroad bed converted to a multi-use trail. unfortunately it is mostly
    sand, but there are patches that have had a good layer of gravel layered down. the main problem
    last time is it was before i had my car. riding 40 miles on flat terrain is fine, but to get
    back home from there included a fairly substantial hill (at least it is after the 40 mile ride).
    this time i can ride, and then come back to a car where i can sit for a while with the AC and
    rest for a bit before driving home.

    > > is one trail that if anybody came to visit/ride, i would lead them there (only 45 miles away
    > > from farmington).
    >
    > Funny, the first time I read that I thought it said "I would LEAVE them there"!
    >

    he he he, i'm not that mean.

    > > but i will have to save that trail as a new job celebration as the gas alone in my car would
    > > cost more than i currently have.
    >
    > Hey, something to look forward to (can you tie that tie yet?)
    >
    >

    i'm getting there, i can get a big lumpy knot with a wrinkly tie. nothing interview material yet,
    but i'm gaining. so far i managed to finish of two good knots. aside from the fact that on one, the
    big side was hanging down 10" from my belt line, and the other may as well been a little string tie
    as it was much too high.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  4. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Tue, 20 May 2003 21:41:26 -0400, Technician wrote:

    > unfortunately it is mostly sand, but there are patches that have had a good layer of gravel
    > layered down.

    I don't know why land manager (or trail maintainers) haven't figured out that sand is evil. Gravel
    runs a close second - I've had two friends go down hard on fireroads (one had to be hospitalized)
    because of gravel.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  5. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Tue, 20 May 2003 21:41:26 -0400, Technician wrote:
    >
    > > unfortunately it is mostly sand, but there are patches that have had a good layer of gravel
    > > layered down.
    >
    > I don't know why land manager (or trail maintainers) haven't figured out that sand is evil. Gravel
    > runs a close second - I've had two friends go down hard on fireroads (one had to be hospitalized)
    > because of gravel.
    >
    >

    Because it is used by ATVs. it compacts well and is more stable, and so will be a little harder to
    spin big ruts into it. they care not for the mountain bikers.

    But then, i would much prefer gravel to sand any day.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  6. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Wed, 21 May 2003 08:48:56 -0400, Technician wrote:
    > [email protected] says...

    >> I don't know why land manager (or trail maintainers) haven't figured out that sand is evil.
    >> Gravel runs a close second - I've had two friends go down hard on fireroads (one had to be
    >> hospitalized) because of gravel.
    >
    > Because it is used by ATVs. it compacts well and is more stable, and so will be a little harder to
    > spin big ruts into it. they care not for the mountain bikers.

    Actually, I've never seen an ATV trail with gravel. Around here, they just tend to be enourmous dirt
    ruts (~3-4 feet deep).

    I guess I can understand what they do - they're just trying to keep the roads from eroding and
    gravel is all they really have. The biggest problem on these trails is water, not users. And they
    want to lay it on thick so they don't have to keep coming back. That just makes it kind of
    dangerous.

    > But then, i would much prefer gravel to sand any day.

    Absolutely! The place time I really ran into much sand was Moab, but I learned to hate it
    rather quickly.

    The funniest choice I've seen around here was rocks, not gravel. We're talking the 6-12 inch
    variety. They filled in the areas that tend to collect water. I rather enjoyed it - it made some
    parts of the fireroad quite technical. A lot of people bitched about it, I'm sure, since it wasn't
    unusual to see rider get off and walk their bike. Eventually, it disappeared into the mud.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
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