RR: Longridge Fell Forrest, Forest Of Bowland. Errrmm, 'long'......ish

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Shaun Rimmer, Apr 22, 2003.

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  1. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Only discovered this place a week or so ago, and had a couple of walks there already - gorgeous
    (privately) managed forest in a fantastic landscape, excellent views, and some very nice looking
    singletrack!

    I figures 'gotta ride and explore there soon!' So, had a semi-plan for Monday, but weather is
    looking iffy - been raining all night and most of the morning. Called my mate up anyway, he's got
    other plans, so if I do go, it's a solo affair....hhmmmm.......

    .........By 12:00 p.m. rain had stopped (for now) and I was kitted up and ready to go. I knew my way
    there, but didn't know how far it was, so, I just set off on road and pedalled gently. Some nice
    roads around us though, passing through quiet and pretty rural areas, so even the road ride didn't
    suck too much, apart from it being 7 road miles virtually all uphill to the trailhead. Did I drop in
    the word 'road' enough yet?.............

    I passed the famous Jesuit run Stonyhurst College on the way, biggest old building in Lancashire,
    and really quite an impressive sight. Tolkien's son was taught there at one time I believe, and so
    was Sherlock Holmes author, Arthur Conan Doyle, the desk he engraved his initials into (bad boy) at
    the time is still there, proudly on show. Many of the characters in his books were said to have been
    taken from his fellow pupils there.

    Took me about 44.35 minutes to get there (heh), and I stopped at the carpark at the base of the
    forest hill for a drink, a piss, and a few minutes chilling. Guy on a Specialised approached, said
    'hi', checked I didn't have a mechanical (nice bloke), and headed off up the steep-ish switchbacked
    fireroad. 5 minutes later, I headed up the same way.

    Weather was getting humid now, and by the time I got to the top of the fireroad, it was time to take
    off my fleece. Then it hailed on me, then it rained, then it stopped, then it got windy. Before
    setting off, I wound all the pre-load off the Bombers that I'd put on recently to aid me in my
    commutes. Much better!

    I headed off a little further to a piece of s/track Kath and myself had spotted previously, and hit
    that. Passed a couple of walkers with dogs, exchanged pleasantries (all the walkers were friendly,
    and I encountered many), then continued. Track was slow going, with little ledged sections and a few
    small boulders to negotiate, a nice semi-technical warm up for me, with me being out of things a
    little lately.

    All too soon, I was back on fireroad, and wondering which way to go. I looked right, and saw that
    the fireroad narrowed to singleterack, and my sense of direction and position told me it would
    likely join up to the steep singletrack climb Kath and I first took into the woods. I mentally
    marked it for later as my DH exit route.

    I turned left, and after a short while, saw some narrow s/t through the woods, heading down and left
    again. I took it, and it was whoopy-swoopy and fun! Ended in a minute back on f/r though, so, I took
    the road right, followed it back up the hill to where I joined that s/t in the first place. I saw
    about 10 walkers emerging from the trees in front of me, and noted a trail there. I took it, and was
    soon buzzin through the woods and having fun. This track started to climb some, and was 'paved' with
    loose rocks of various sizes. I found this difficult in a few spots, and had to walk one section
    when the bike failed to drop into granny gear, and I couldn't re-start on the slippy rocky ground
    after I'd sorted it (adjustment, remove gritty mud), but I was soon back in the flow.

    The s/t opened out, the trees were now to the left and behind me, and I was on the side of the hill
    overlooking the valley to the right. I pedalled a bit further, and stopped at a trig point for the
    view. Pity it was misty, as it looked out over a beautiful (I was told) valley. While there, I let
    some pressure out of my tyres - they'd been up at near 60 psi for road riding, dropped them to 18
    rear 16 front) - got back on the bike, and continued. Wow! 'That's what this bike is all about' I
    remembered; nice, smooth flowing along the rough narrow trails at speed, just soaking it all up and
    railing along, flowing over sudden boulders rather than bouncing around. Heheheheh, I was having
    fun as the s/t snaked slightly downwards in front of me, weaving and rollercoasting, loving it,
    every second.

    I soon got to a junction, took the left downhill; more s/t, muddy in places, but rideable and fun.
    The trail veered right after a short way, and I was riding back in the opposite direction to the
    s/t from the trig point, but further down the hill. This bit was multi-singletrack, narrow buff
    ribbons woven and interwoven, many lines to pick, if you picked quick, and it ended in another
    junction. I could either go back uphill along a very narrow trail through the heather, between the
    trees and re-join the s/t that lead to the trig point (squared loop), or down through the woods and
    into the unknown.

    I decided to go back up the hill for now, and take the s/t I'd already been on, but in the reverse
    direction - I wanted a shot at the narrow rock section again, but downhill this time.

    Again I enjoyed the s/t up to the trig point, and saw two grouse nearby,

    time, but they kept up with the foreplay, so I quit the voyeurism, and left them too it. I was soon
    back at the rocky section and bouncing down it merrily. I was taking it easy a little, 'cos it'd
    been a while, and I wanted to check I still functioned on this stuff. Well, I did, and gained some
    speed, made some big grins and a few 'whoo-hoo!'s.

    Came back out at the fireroad again, took a left, dropped the saddle a little so I could move around
    more easily, then followed the f/r until it narrowed into s/t. Now this was the goods! It wove along
    the side of the hill, in and out of the trees a while, mostly downward. I got some speed up, and my
    body remembered what to do again - I became highly animated, and the bike settled into the flow
    nicely, easily handling the turns and changing surfaces.

    Soon I was deep into the woods, and the track again became multiple woven ribbons of singletrack. I
    was thoroughly enjoying twisting and turning along, avoiding stumps and large rocks at a moments
    notice, as they suddenly appeared out of the dimness under the canopy of the dark forest, when
    suddenly, I'm out into the light again, and squinting to see where I was.

    I'd guessed right, and I was at the top of the steep (hey, it's all relative, right?) s/t between
    the trees, that Kath and I had climbed on foot previously. Without hesitation, I swung the bike left
    and onto it, raised my scrawny butt off the lowered saddle, kicked it into the big ring and hammered
    down. Heheheheh, wow, this was fun, nice and steep, smooth, then rocky, then rooty then smooth
    again. The loamy ground was wetted from the earlier rains, and a little loose in places, and I felt
    it, every time I even slightly altered course, I felt the reduced connection to the earth, and was
    now more floating than railing, left to right, over hump and jump, turning suddenly to avoid the
    dead tree across the trail that I'd remembered was there, had been waiting for. I got some speed up.
    I didn't get too much speed up, because I didn't crash, or lock the wheels, or even skid side-swipe
    fashion in a turn. I just went quickly, as quickly as I could, and grinned all the way, forearms
    aching familiarly.

    I laughed and laughed at the fun I was having, at the happiness of the child inside of me as I
    neared the end of the trail. I came to the gate at the roadside, and headed out onto the road. I
    climbed off the bike, raised the saddle again, cranked all the pre-load back onto the bombers, and
    headed off back home. I went home past the front of Stonyhurst College this time, and down into
    Hurst green as the sun came out. I stopped at the Bayley Arms pub for a cold one in the sun, chatted
    to some folks, then continued. I was soon home and ready to remove the thick layer of mud that
    covered me, and eat!

    21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each off road mile, was packed with
    juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my wheels in quite a while. I'll be there again soon,
    over and over - it's a safe bet ',;~}~

    Shaun aRe
     
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  2. Jimbo

    Jimbo Guest

    Shaun Rimmer wrote:

    >
    > 21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each off road mile, was packed with
    > juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my wheels in quite a while. I'll be there again soon,
    > over and over - it's a safe bet ',;~}~
    >
    > Shaun aRe

    Good stuff!!!

    Jimbo(san)
     
  3. Pete Jones

    Pete Jones Guest

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 13:32:13 -0400, "jimbo(san)" <[email protected]> blathered:

    >> 21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each off road mile, was packed with
    >> juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my wheels in quite a while. I'll be there again
    >> soon, over and over - it's a safe bet

    Sounds good - got a grid ref for that? I bought the Trough of Bowland
    1:25000 map a fortnight ago, with a view to revisiting an area I last rode in over 10 years ago -
    can't find Longridge Fell on it.

    I'm planning on riding the Whin Fell bridleway followed by the Croasdale Roman Road to High Salter.
    I'd originally planned to tie it into a 3-day one-way trip including the Howgills & High Cup Nick,
    with a return by train. However, I couldn't wait in case I missed the dry conditions on the North
    Pennines, and did the Nick as a day trip a week ago Saturday -
    http://www.btinternet.com/~peteajones/temp/inbred-nickpan.jpg I'm hoping this rain will clear away
    the haze we've had with all the dry weather.

    Pete
    ----
    http://www.btinternet.com/~peteajones/
     
  4. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Pete Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...

    > On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 13:32:13 -0400, "jimbo(san)" <[email protected]> blathered:
    >
    > >> 21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each off
    road
    > >> mile, was packed with juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my
    wheels
    > >> in quite a while. I'll be there again soon, over and over - it's a safe
    bet

    Funny, that sure doesn't SOUND like Jim's style(san)!

    Bill "but then again, 'packed with juicy goodness' could apply to ALL our rides, eh?" S.
     
  5. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 13:37:45 +0100, "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote:

    [snip RR ... didn't even read this CRAP!]

    You don't even ride a bike who are you trying to fool!?

    Nice RR.

    Peace, Bill ( I really did read it) Wheeler The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than
    as a reflector, that is, the mind should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of
    the world.
    :-]
     
  6. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > Only discovered this place a week or so ago, and had a couple of walks there already - gorgeous
    > (privately) managed forest in a fantastic landscape, excellent views, and some very nice looking
    > singletrack!
    >
    > I figures 'gotta ride and explore there soon!' So, had a semi-plan for Monday, but weather is
    > looking iffy - been raining all night and most of the morning. Called my mate up anyway, he's got
    > other plans, so if I do go, it's a solo affair....hhmmmm.......
    >
    <snip most excellent RR>

    > 21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each off road mile, was packed with
    > juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my wheels in quite a while. I'll be there again soon,
    > over and over - it's a safe bet ',;~}~
    >
    >
    > Shaun aRe

    You know Shaun, you really should do more RR's!
    --
    Slacker
     
  7. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    jimbo(san) <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Shaun Rimmer wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > 21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each off
    road
    > > mile, was packed with juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my
    wheels
    > > in quite a while. I'll be there again soon, over and over - it's a safe
    bet
    > > ',;~}~
    > >
    > > Shaun aRe
    >
    > Good stuff!!!

    Prolly going back for more this Saturday with Spademan and Howard T ',;~}~

    Shaun aRe - hope the rain holds off.......and my forks hold out.......
     
  8. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Bill Wheeler <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 13:37:45 +0100, "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > [snip RR ... didn't even read this CRAP!]

    Yeah, right.......

    > You don't even ride a bike who are you trying to fool!?

    Heh - true, I think it was riding me.....

    > Nice RR.

    Make your bloody mind up Wheeler ',;~}~

    > Peace, Bill ( I really did read it) Wheeler

    I know - my writing makes for irresistable reading ',;~}~

    Cheers!

    Shaun aRe
     
  9. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Pete Jones <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 13:32:13 -0400, "jimbo(san)" <jknobbi[email protected]> blathered:
    >
    > >> 21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each off
    road
    > >> mile, was packed with juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my
    wheels
    > >> in quite a while. I'll be there again soon, over and over - it's a safe
    bet
    >
    > Sounds good - got a grid ref for that? I bought the Trough of Bowland
    > 1:25000 map a fortnight ago, with a view to revisiting an area I last rode in over 10 years ago -
    > can't find Longridge Fell on it.

    Nope - no grid ref I'm afraid. You want to look for the Forest of Bowland, nearer Clitheroe/Whalley.

    > I'm planning on riding the Whin Fell bridleway followed by the Croasdale Roman Road to High
    > Salter. I'd originally planned to tie it into a 3-day one-way trip including the Howgills & High
    > Cup Nick, with a return by train. However, I couldn't wait in case I missed the dry conditions on
    > the North Pennines, and did the Nick as a day trip a week ago Saturday -
    > http://www.btinternet.com/~peteajones/temp/inbred-nickpan.jpg I'm hoping this rain will clear away
    > the haze we've had with all the dry weather.

    Another big ride - nice work. Good luck with the routing.

    Shaun aRe
     
  10. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Sorni <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Pete Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]...
    >
    > > On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 13:32:13 -0400, "jimbo(san)" <[email protected]> blathered:
    > >
    > > >> 21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each
    off
    > road
    > > >> mile, was packed with juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my
    > wheels
    > > >> in quite a while. I'll be there again soon, over and over - it's a
    safe
    > bet
    >
    > Funny, that sure doesn't SOUND like Jim's style(san)!
    >
    > Bill "but then again, 'packed with juicy goodness' could apply to ALL our rides, eh?" S.

    Heh - you know it was me and what happened - just another bad attribution snippage ',;~}~

    Shaun aRe
     
  11. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Slacker <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Only discovered this place a week or so ago, and had a couple of walks
    there
    > > already - gorgeous (privately) managed forest in a fantastic landscape, excellent views, and
    > > some very nice looking singletrack!
    > >
    > > I figures 'gotta ride and explore there soon!' So, had a semi-plan for Monday, but weather is
    > > looking iffy - been raining all night and most of
    the
    > > morning. Called my mate up anyway, he's got other plans, so if I do go,
    it's
    > > a solo affair....hhmmmm.......
    > >
    > <snip most excellent RR>

    You're too kind Slacker ',;~}~

    > > 21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each off
    road
    > > mile, was packed with juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my
    wheels
    > > in quite a while. I'll be there again soon, over and over - it's a safe
    bet
    > > ',;~}~
    > >
    > >
    > > Shaun aRe
    >
    >
    > You know Shaun, you really should do more RR's!

    You know Slacker, I should really do more rides!

    Shaun aRe - it's the ride that makes the RR.
     
  12. Taywood

    Taywood Guest

    >> Sounds good - got a grid ref for that? I bought the Trough of Bowland
    >> 1:25000 map a fortnight ago, with a view to revisiting an area I last rode in over 10 years ago -
    >> can't find Longridge Fell on it.

    Its there. Bottom righthand corner on the West page. You need the road map for M6 Jct 31A. Great RR
    Shaun, you rode NW from the college but I cant see on the map the car park you rested in, except one
    at the far westend at Jeffrey Hill.

    Just North of there above Dunsop Bridge is a neat bridleway running from the Trough Road to Brennand
    Farm, over to Whitendale and continue east to Slaidburn (or follow the rough footpath N to the
    Salter Fell Road). Mike
     
  13. Pete Jones

    Pete Jones Guest

  14. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Taywood <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > >> Sounds good - got a grid ref for that? I bought the Trough of Bowland
    > >> 1:25000 map a fortnight ago, with a view to revisiting an area I last rode in over 10 years ago
    > >> - can't find Longridge Fell on it.
    >
    > Its there. Bottom righthand corner on the West page. You need the road map for M6 Jct 31A. Great
    > RR Shaun, you rode NW from the college but I cant see on the map the car park you rested in,
    > except one at the far westend at Jeffrey Hill.

    Cheers Westie. The carpark is on the main fireroad, bottom of the hill. If you look on a map of the
    place, it shows two loops. A higher one, and a lower one. Part of the loop shown is actually road,
    the carpark being where it changes from d/t to road.

    > Just North of there above Dunsop Bridge is a neat bridleway running from the Trough Road to
    > Brennand Farm, over to Whitendale and continue east to Slaidburn (or follow the rough footpath N
    > to the Salter Fell Road). Mike

    Cool - might look into that - there's a b/w runs right through the forest, and down over that way -
    might be part of the same one....

    Shaun aRe
     
  15. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Pete Jones <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >>> Sounds good - got a grid ref for that?
    >
    > >Its there. Bottom righthand corner on the West page.
    >
    > Oh aye. Ta.
    >
    > >> http://www.btinternet.com/~peteajones/temp/inbred-nickpan.jpg
    > >Another big ride - nice work.
    >
    > If you're local to the Trough of Bowland, High Cup Nick is within easy driving distance, well
    > worth a quick trip up the M6 while it's dry: http://www.offroadadventures-online.com/rr009.html

    Cheers again Pete - filed it away in case I get a chance to go.

    Shaun aRe
     
  16. Taywood

    Taywood Guest

  17. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

  18. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Shaun Rimmer <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Taywood <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Just found another RR on Rimmers Hill. Dont know the originator or the date.
    > >
    > > http://benhaworth.frankencrank.com/purist_solo_ride.html
    > >
    > > Mike
    >
    > Nice one Mike! His RR's obviously aren't a patch on my eloquent and evocative literary artworks,
    > but thanks anyhow - I e-mailed the guy to see if he can give me some local riding pointers.
    >
    > Super old fruit!

    Further news on the Benjamin Howarth geezer is, seems he may well live/have lived just around the
    corner from Kath's (my fiancée's) mum's house, and was a good friend of her younger bro'
    Si.........soon find out at any rate....

    Shaun aRe
     
  19. Paladin

    Paladin Guest

    "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Only discovered this place a week or so ago, and had a couple of walks there already - gorgeous
    > (privately) managed forest in a fantastic landscape, excellent views, and some very nice looking
    > singletrack!

    Joo take any pictures?? Or do you prefer (like me) a thousand words...?
    >
    > I figures 'gotta ride and explore there soon!' So, had a semi-plan for Monday, but weather is
    > looking iffy - been raining all night and most of the morning. Called my mate up anyway, he's got
    > other plans, so if I do go, it's a solo affair....hhmmmm.......

    Exploring solo can be great fun.
    >
    > .........By 12:00 p.m. rain had stopped (for now) and I was kitted up and ready to go. I knew my
    > way there, but didn't know how far it was, so, I just set off on road and pedalled gently. Some
    > nice roads around us though, passing through quiet and pretty rural areas, so even the road ride
    > didn't suck too much, apart from it being 7 road miles virtually all uphill to the trailhead. Did
    > I drop in the word 'road' enough yet?.............
    >
    We heard ya, already, ya closet gay roadie!

    > I passed the famous Jesuit run Stonyhurst College on the way, biggest old building in Lancashire,
    > and really quite an impressive sight. Tolkien's son was taught there at one time I believe, and so
    > was Sherlock Holmes author, Arthur Conan Doyle, the desk he engraved his initials into (bad boy)
    > at the time is still there, proudly on show. Many of the characters in his books were said to have
    > been taken from his fellow pupils there.
    >
    Pause for some cultural asides...

    > Took me about 44.35 minutes to get there (heh), and I stopped at the carpark at the base of the
    > forest hill for a drink, a piss, and a few minutes chilling. Guy on a Specialised approached, said
    > 'hi', checked I didn't have a mechanical (nice bloke), and headed off up the steep-ish
    > switchbacked fireroad. 5 minutes later, I headed up the same way.

    The polite Brits. Gotta love em. What really happened, you chilled your piss? your drink? whaat??
    >
    > Weather was getting humid now, and by the time I got to the top of the fireroad, it was time to
    > take off my fleece. Then it hailed on me, then it rained, then it stopped, then it got windy.
    > Before setting off, I wound all the pre-load off the Bombers that I'd put on recently to aid me in
    > my commutes. Much better!

    I love the Brit Mtbike magazines. Riders always wearing rain gear! heh.
    >
    > I headed off a little further to a piece of s/track Kath and myself had spotted previously, and
    > hit that. Passed a couple of walkers with dogs, exchanged pleasantries (all the walkers were
    > friendly, and I encountered many), then continued. Track was slow going, with little ledged
    > sections and a few small boulders to negotiate, a nice semi-technical warm up for me, with me
    > being out of things a little lately.
    >
    Now you're starting to cook with gas...

    > All too soon, I was back on fireroad, and wondering which way to go. I looked right, and saw that
    > the fireroad narrowed to singleterack, and my sense of direction and position told me it would
    > likely join up to the steep singletrack climb Kath and I first took into the woods. I mentally
    > marked it for later as my DH exit route.
    >
    > I turned left, and after a short while, saw some narrow s/t through the woods, heading down and
    > left again. I took it, and it was whoopy-swoopy and fun! Ended in a minute back on f/r though, so,
    > I took the road right, followed it back up the hill to where I joined that s/t in the first place.
    > I saw about 10 walkers emerging from the trees in front of me, and noted a trail there. I took it,
    > and was soon buzzin through the woods and having fun. This track started to climb some, and was
    > 'paved' with loose rocks of various sizes. I found this difficult in a few spots, and had to walk
    > one section when the bike failed to drop into granny gear, and I couldn't re-start on the slippy
    > rocky ground after I'd sorted it (adjustment, remove gritty mud), but I was soon back in the flow.

    Mom, I don't know what happened, I was climbing this hill, and my bike stopped! Bad bike!
    >
    > The s/t opened out, the trees were now to the left and behind me, and I was on the side of the
    > hill overlooking the valley to the right. I pedalled a bit further, and stopped at a trig point
    > for the view. Pity it was misty, as it looked out over a beautiful (I was told) valley. While
    > there, I let some pressure out of my tyres - they'd been up at near 60 psi for road riding,
    > dropped them to 18 rear 16 front) - got back on the bike, and continued. Wow! 'That's what this
    > bike is all about' I remembered; nice, smooth flowing along the rough narrow trails at speed, just
    > soaking it all up and railing along, flowing over sudden boulders rather than bouncing around.
    > Heheheheh, I was having fun as the s/t snaked slightly downwards in front of me, weaving and
    > rollercoasting, loving it, every second.
    >
    Awe inspiring, to tell the truth...

    > I soon got to a junction, took the left downhill; more s/t, muddy in places, but rideable and fun.
    > The trail veered right after a short way, and I was riding back in the opposite direction to the
    > s/t from the trig point, but further down the hill. This bit was multi-singletrack, narrow buff
    > ribbons woven and interwoven, many lines to pick, if you picked quick, and it ended in another
    > junction. I could either go back uphill along a very narrow trail through the heather, between the
    > trees and re-join the s/t that lead to the trig point (squared loop), or down through the woods
    > and into the unknown.

    Multi or Single? Make up yer mind, will ya?

    > I decided to go back up the hill for now, and take the s/t I'd already been on, but in the reverse
    > direction - I wanted a shot at the narrow rock section again, but downhill this time.
    >
    > Again I enjoyed the s/t up to the trig point, and saw two grouse nearby,

    > time, but they kept up with the foreplay, so I quit the voyeurism, and left them too it. I was
    > soon back at the rocky section and bouncing down it merrily. I was taking it easy a little, 'cos
    > it'd been a while, and I wanted to check I still functioned on this stuff. Well, I did, and gained
    > some speed, made some big grins and a few 'whoo-hoo!'s.

    Disco on wheels, way to boogie.
    >
    > Came back out at the fireroad again, took a left, dropped the saddle a little so I could move
    > around more easily, then followed the f/r until it narrowed into s/t. Now this was the goods! It
    > wove along the side of the hill, in and out of the trees a while, mostly downward. I got some
    > speed up, and my body remembered what to do again - I became highly animated, and the bike settled
    > into the flow nicely, easily handling the turns and changing surfaces.
    >
    > Soon I was deep into the woods, and the track again became multiple woven ribbons of singletrack.
    > I was thoroughly enjoying twisting and turning along, avoiding stumps and large rocks at a moments
    > notice, as they suddenly appeared out of the dimness under the canopy of the dark forest, when
    > suddenly, I'm out into the light again, and squinting to see where I was.
    >
    > I'd guessed right, and I was at the top of the steep (hey, it's all relative, right?) s/t between
    > the trees, that Kath and I had climbed on foot previously. Without hesitation, I swung the bike
    > left and onto it, raised my scrawny butt off the lowered saddle, kicked it into the big ring and
    > hammered down. Heheheheh, wow, this was fun, nice and steep, smooth, then rocky, then rooty then
    > smooth again. The loamy ground was wetted from the earlier rains, and a little loose in places,
    > and I felt it, every time I even slightly altered course, I felt the reduced connection to the
    > earth, and was now more floating than railing, left to right, over hump and jump, turning suddenly
    > to avoid the dead tree across the trail that I'd remembered was there, had been waiting for. I got
    > some speed up. I didn't get too much speed up, because I didn't crash, or lock the wheels, or even
    > skid side-swipe fashion in a turn. I just went quickly, as quickly as I could, and grinned all the
    > way, forearms aching familiarly.
    >
    You musta been going too slow, no skid, no crash, no lock up??

    > I laughed and laughed at the fun I was having, at the happiness of the child inside of me as I
    > neared the end of the trail. I came to the gate at the roadside, and headed out onto the road. I
    > climbed off the bike, raised the saddle again, cranked all the pre-load back onto the bombers, and
    > headed off back home. I went home past the front of Stonyhurst College this time, and down into
    > Hurst green as the sun came out. I stopped at the Bayley Arms pub for a cold one in the sun,
    > chatted to some folks, then continued. I was soon home and ready to remove the thick layer of mud
    > that covered me, and eat!

    Life is good...
    >
    > 21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each off road mile, was packed with
    > juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my wheels in quite a while. I'll be there again soon,
    > over and over - it's a safe bet ',;~}~
    >
    >
    > Shaun aRe

    I didn't know you could write so much. Now that sounded like a keeper in the scrapbook of
    life, eh what??

    Paladin
     
  20. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Paladin <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Only discovered this place a week or so ago, and had a couple of walks
    there
    > > already - gorgeous (privately) managed forest in a fantastic landscape, excellent views, and
    > > some very nice looking singletrack!
    >
    > Joo take any pictures?? Or do you prefer (like me) a thousand words...?

    I love to write, that has to be said (well, written actually...). I do like to take photos too, but
    I am currently without a camera, and never have posessed a digi.

    > > I figures 'gotta ride and explore there soon!' So, had a semi-plan for Monday, but weather is
    > > looking iffy - been raining all night and most of
    the
    > > morning. Called my mate up anyway, he's got other plans, so if I do go,
    it's
    > > a solo affair....hhmmmm.......
    >
    > Exploring solo can be great fun.

    Oh aye! Wish I coulda gotten a lift there, and put my time on the bike all into the place itself.

    > > .........By 12:00 p.m. rain had stopped (for now) and I was kitted up
    and
    > > ready to go. I knew my way there, but didn't know how far it was, so, I
    just
    > > set off on road and pedalled gently. Some nice roads around us though, passing through quiet and
    > > pretty rural areas, so even the road ride
    didn't
    > > suck too much, apart from it being 7 road miles virtually all uphill to
    the
    > > trailhead. Did I drop in the word 'road' enough yet?.............
    > >
    > We heard ya, already, ya closet gay roadie!

    Yeah, right - I Fking hate riding on road - I do it every day to get to work an back, and it kills
    me. The worst part though, isn't the road itself, it's the motorists that pass me at 50 - 70 + mph,
    no more than a foot or two from my side. Wankers. I am not a fan of stress or anger.............

    > > I passed the famous Jesuit run Stonyhurst College on the way, biggest
    old
    > > building in Lancashire, and really quite an impressive sight. Tolkien's
    son
    > > was taught there at one time I believe, and so was Sherlock Holmes
    author,
    > > Arthur Conan Doyle, the desk he engraved his initials into (bad boy) at
    the
    > > time is still there, proudly on show. Many of the characters in his
    books
    > > were said to have been taken from his fellow pupils there.
    > >
    > Pause for some cultural asides...

    Gotta be done!

    > > Took me about 44.35 minutes to get there (heh), and I stopped at the
    carpark
    > > at the base of the forest hill for a drink, a piss, and a few minutes chilling. Guy on a
    > > Specialised approached, said 'hi', checked I didn't
    have
    > > a mechanical (nice bloke), and headed off up the steep-ish switchbacked fireroad. 5 minutes
    > > later, I headed up the same way.
    >
    > The polite Brits. Gotta love em. What really happened, you chilled your piss? your drink? whaat??

    Heheheheh, well, actually........nah - just took a leak, sat with a drink, had a >cigarette< (bad
    unhealthy man!), sent a text to Kath (I'm here lover, the bad farmer in the tractor didn't run me
    over, love you, found a good

    > > Weather was getting humid now, and by the time I got to the top of the fireroad, it was time to
    > > take off my fleece. Then it hailed on me, then
    it
    > > rained, then it stopped, then it got windy. Before setting off, I wound
    all
    > > the pre-load off the Bombers that I'd put on recently to aid me in my commutes. Much better!
    >
    > I love the Brit Mtbike magazines. Riders always wearing rain gear! heh.

    It sucks, 'cos even with the really good breathables, you put them on to keep the water out, but end
    up like a boil-in-the-bag chicken instead......

    > > I headed off a little further to a piece of s/track Kath and myself had spotted previously, and
    > > hit that. Passed a couple of walkers with dogs, exchanged pleasantries (all the walkers were
    > > friendly, and I encountered many), then continued. Track was slow going, with little ledged
    > > sections
    and
    > > a few small boulders to negotiate, a nice semi-technical warm up for me, with me being out of
    > > things a little lately.
    > >
    > Now you're starting to cook with gas...

    It musta been the pasta with shredded yellow habs in the sauce the night before.....

    I found this difficult in a few spots, and had to walk one
    > > section when the bike failed to drop into granny gear, and I couldn't re-start on the slippy
    > > rocky ground after I'd sorted it (adjustment,
    remove
    > > gritty mud), but I was soon back in the flow.
    >
    > Mom, I don't know what happened, I was climbing this hill, and my bike stopped! Bad bike!

    Heheheh! I'm just outa shape, outa practice, and my front mech is badly worn (rattles all over on
    the pivots, limited useful movement). So, when it failed to drop to granny gear, I failed to be able
    to pedal through it in the middle ring.

    got back on the bike, and continued.
    > > Wow! 'That's what this bike is all about' I remembered; nice, smooth
    flowing
    > > along the rough narrow trails at speed, just soaking it all up and
    railing
    > > along, flowing over sudden boulders rather than bouncing around.
    Heheheheh,
    > > I was having fun as the s/t snaked slightly downwards in front of me, weaving and
    > > rollercoasting, loving it, every second.
    > >
    > Awe inspiring, to tell the truth...

    Oh aye! I was 'fly catchin' alright ',;~}~

    > > This bit was multi-singletrack, narrow buff ribbons woven and interwoven, many lines to pick, if
    > > you picked quick, and it
    ended
    > > in another junction. I could either go back uphill along a very narrow
    trail
    > > through the heather, between the trees and re-join the s/t that lead to
    the
    > > trig point (squared loop), or down through the woods and into the
    unknown.
    >
    > Multi or Single? Make up yer mind, will ya?

    Whatchoo mean?

    Me? Well, I mean, lots of singletracks (note the plural) running next to each other, sometimes....
    Sometimes joining, crossing, like a group of ribbons tied to a pole and blowing in the wind,
    constantly weaving and unweaving, intertwining and seperating, sublimely animated in their life's
    rythm. Me, the onlooker, my eyes riding their rythm, mind and soul follow, watching first one
    ribbon, then another, then several at once, guessing, wondering in my child-like excitment, 'which
    way will which ribbon-rythm take me next?'.

    _That_, dear Chris, is what _I_ am meaning.

    > > Again I enjoyed the s/t up to the trig point, and saw two grouse nearby,

    any
    > > time, but they kept up with the foreplay, so I quit the voyeurism, and
    left
    > > them too it. I was soon back at the rocky section and bouncing down it merrily. I was taking it
    > > easy a little, 'cos it'd been a while, and I
    wanted
    > > to check I still functioned on this stuff. Well, I did, and gained some speed, made some big
    > > grins and a few 'whoo-hoo!'s.
    >
    > Disco on wheels, way to boogie.

    > > I'd guessed right, and I was at the top of the steep (hey, it's all relative, right?) s/t
    > > between the trees, that Kath and I had climbed on
    foot
    > > previously. Without hesitation, I swung the bike left and onto it,
    raised my
    > > scrawny butt off the lowered saddle, kicked it into the big ring and hammered down. Heheheheh,
    > > wow, this was fun, nice and steep, smooth,
    then
    > > rocky, then rooty then smooth again. The loamy ground was wetted from
    the
    > > earlier rains, and a little loose in places, and I felt it, every time I even slightly altered
    > > course, I felt the reduced connection to the
    earth,
    > > and was now more floating than railing, left to right, over hump and
    jump,
    > > turning suddenly to avoid the dead tree across the trail that I'd
    remembered
    > > was there, had been waiting for. I got some speed up. I didn't get too
    much
    > > speed up, because I didn't crash, or lock the wheels, or even skid side-swipe fashion in a turn.
    > > I just went quickly, as quickly as I
    could,
    > > and grinned all the way, forearms aching familiarly.
    > >
    > You musta been going too slow, no skid, no crash, no lock up??

    Didn't wanna rip the place up now did I, huh? Have JD stick a boot to my head eh? Sheesh......

    > > I laughed and laughed at the fun I was having, at the happiness of the
    child
    > > inside of me as I neared the end of the trail. I came to the gate at the roadside, and headed
    > > out onto the road. I climbed off the bike, raised
    the
    > > saddle again, cranked all the pre-load back onto the bombers, and headed
    off
    > > back home. I went home past the front of Stonyhurst College this time,
    and
    > > down into Hurst green as the sun came out. I stopped at the Bayley Arms
    pub
    > > for a cold one in the sun, chatted to some folks, then continued. I was
    soon
    > > home and ready to remove the thick layer of mud that covered me, and
    eat!
    >
    > Life is good...

    Especially when you consider the alternative........

    > > 21 miles total, is all, and only 6 1/2 of it on the fell, but each off
    road
    > > mile, was packed with juicy goodness, and the most fun I've had on my
    wheels
    > > in quite a while. I'll be there again soon, over and over - it's a safe
    bet
    > > ',;~}~
    > >
    > >
    > > Shaun aRe
    >
    > I didn't know you could write so much.

    I love to write. I write for fun sometimes, and actually hang on a sorta writers NG from time to
    time, although it gets quiet there, and it's mostly used for idle chit-chat and banter. Tell you
    what, gonna E-mail you something(s).

    > Now that sounded like a keeper
    > in the scrapbook of life, eh what??

    Heheheh, oh yeah!

    Cheers CB, catcha soon.

    Shaun aRe

    > Paladin
     
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