RR: Losing her cherry (Klondike Bluffs)



R

Raptor

Guest
I'm a modestly expert mountain biker, having ridden almost since there
were mountain bikes. Now I'm not going to plunge down a cliff and my
ballsyness diminishes with age, but if "lots" of others can ride
something, I can too. Despite this experience, and despite living just
200 miles north, I have only done a smattering of Moab's trails. I stick
to my favorites because they're so fun.

I took the new girlfriend down over the holiday and hoped to do some
riding of my own while breaking her in. She's one of my spinning
"students," not terribly strong but a consistent indoor rider,
determined to get in great shape. Also quite the trooper!

This was her first ride on an outdoor bike in decades.

I was looking at Sovereign, because I haven't yet done it myself and it
sounded pretty easy. But the dude at Slickrock Cycles said hmm, maybe
Klondike would be better. Okay, I'd never done that one either. The bike
he rented us was serviceable, but skipped despite her staying in the
middle ring per the shop's suggestion. The front brake also rubbed a
tiny bit.

After she almost blew her breakfast (McDonald's is good enough for an
old non-competitive hand like me, but she needed purer fare), I had her
move the chain to the granny range. She managed nicely, although once
you push against the puke threshold like she did your strength is
brittle. She got a great workout, I just enjoyed riding hard every now
and then, turning around several times to rejoin, encourage, advise,
buss, etc.

The trail is indeed a breeze, great for one's first mountain bike ride.
It has enough deep sandy sections at the bottom to give you a taste of
the "sand boat" technique: get on plane, stay on plane and you'll ride
through it. The climb is long by newbie standards but gradual, mostly on
slickrock. A couple mildly technical situations kept me interested. It's
the kind of climb that one can "spin" up, or hammer and feel like Lance
Armstrong. In the future, I'll use it as a warm-up or cool-down,
something to kill an hour or two with.

I suggest that 20 minutes is a theoretical best time to climb that
trail, but just in theory. It took us three hours out-and-back.

We reached the top, I rode up most of the short singletrack to the fence
on the border of Arches National Park, she pushed much of it. Because
I'm a nice guy, I agreed to walk into the park despite not having
comfortable shoes. It was worth it: nice view, pretty slot canyon.

Descending the singletrack, I was determined to ride the one real
technical (steep, narrow, off-camber) section. I plunged into it, parked
my front wheel on the only significant rock I could find, and endo'd.
Picked up a little trail rash from something on the rear of my bike as I
stumbled over the bars. I'm proud of myself for riding "hard" enough to
actually fall. :) I don't often do that.

She LOVED the downhill, following my line most of the way. She said it
was just like skiing, flowing with gravity. I reminded her to maintain
concentration since a broken collarbone is always one mind wander away.
She handled the bouncy suspension just fine, followed my advice to NEVER
lock the front wheel, and emerged from her first mountain bike ride - in
Moab! - tired & sweaty but unscathed, and psyched.

Next time, we do Top of the World. :)

--
Lynn Wallace

If FDR fought fascism the way Bush fights terrorism, we'd all be
speaking German now.
 
Show some pictures you ****.

Raptor wrote:
> I'm a modestly expert mountain biker, having ridden almost since there
> were mountain bikes. Now I'm not going to plunge down a cliff and my
> ballsyness diminishes with age, but if "lots" of others can ride
> something, I can too. Despite this experience, and despite living just
> 200 miles north, I have only done a smattering of Moab's trails. I stick
> to my favorites because they're so fun.
>
> I took the new girlfriend down over the holiday and hoped to do some
> riding of my own while breaking her in. She's one of my spinning
> "students," not terribly strong but a consistent indoor rider,
> determined to get in great shape. Also quite the trooper!
>
> This was her first ride on an outdoor bike in decades.
>
> I was looking at Sovereign, because I haven't yet done it myself and it
> sounded pretty easy. But the dude at Slickrock Cycles said hmm, maybe
> Klondike would be better. Okay, I'd never done that one either. The bike
> he rented us was serviceable, but skipped despite her staying in the
> middle ring per the shop's suggestion. The front brake also rubbed a
> tiny bit.
>
> After she almost blew her breakfast (McDonald's is good enough for an
> old non-competitive hand like me, but she needed purer fare), I had her
> move the chain to the granny range. She managed nicely, although once
> you push against the puke threshold like she did your strength is
> brittle. She got a great workout, I just enjoyed riding hard every now
> and then, turning around several times to rejoin, encourage, advise,
> buss, etc.
>
> The trail is indeed a breeze, great for one's first mountain bike ride.
> It has enough deep sandy sections at the bottom to give you a taste of
> the "sand boat" technique: get on plane, stay on plane and you'll ride
> through it. The climb is long by newbie standards but gradual, mostly on
> slickrock. A couple mildly technical situations kept me interested. It's
> the kind of climb that one can "spin" up, or hammer and feel like Lance
> Armstrong. In the future, I'll use it as a warm-up or cool-down,
> something to kill an hour or two with.
>
> I suggest that 20 minutes is a theoretical best time to climb that
> trail, but just in theory. It took us three hours out-and-back.
>
> We reached the top, I rode up most of the short singletrack to the fence
> on the border of Arches National Park, she pushed much of it. Because
> I'm a nice guy, I agreed to walk into the park despite not having
> comfortable shoes. It was worth it: nice view, pretty slot canyon.
>
> Descending the singletrack, I was determined to ride the one real
> technical (steep, narrow, off-camber) section. I plunged into it, parked
> my front wheel on the only significant rock I could find, and endo'd.
> Picked up a little trail rash from something on the rear of my bike as I
> stumbled over the bars. I'm proud of myself for riding "hard" enough to
> actually fall. :) I don't often do that.
>
> She LOVED the downhill, following my line most of the way. She said it
> was just like skiing, flowing with gravity. I reminded her to maintain
> concentration since a broken collarbone is always one mind wander away.
> She handled the bouncy suspension just fine, followed my advice to NEVER
> lock the front wheel, and emerged from her first mountain bike ride - in
> Moab! - tired & sweaty but unscathed, and psyched.
>
> Next time, we do Top of the World. :)
>
> --
> Lynn Wallace
>
> If FDR fought fascism the way Bush fights terrorism, we'd all be
> speaking German now.
 
Raptor wrote:
> I'm a modestly expert mountain biker, having ridden almost since there
> were mountain bikes. Now I'm not going to plunge down a cliff and my
> ballsyness diminishes with age, but if "lots" of others can ride
> something, I can too. Despite this experience, and despite living just
> 200 miles north, I have only done a smattering of Moab's trails. I stick
> to my favorites because they're so fun.
>
> I took the new girlfriend down over the holiday and hoped to do some
> riding of my own while breaking her in. She's one of my spinning
> "students," not terribly strong but a consistent indoor rider,
> determined to get in great shape. Also quite the trooper!
>
>
> She LOVED the downhill, following my line most of the way. She said it
> was just like skiing, flowing with gravity. I reminded her to maintain
> concentration since a broken collarbone is always one mind wander away.
> She handled the bouncy suspension just fine, followed my advice to NEVER
> lock the front wheel, and emerged from her first mountain bike ride - in
> Moab! - tired & sweaty but unscathed, and psyched.
>
> Next time, we do Top of the World. :)
>
> --
> Lynn Wallace



Cool. I've found beginners on Amasaback, and they *were not* having
fun... glad you found something she could ride and enjoy.

CDB
 
Raptor wrote:
> I'm a modestly expert mountain biker



I'd like to put that notion to the test some day, spinnerboy.

> I was looking at Sovereign, because I haven't yet done it myself and it
> sounded pretty easy. But the dude at Slickrock Cycles said hmm, maybe
> Klondike would be better.



Klondike is a better newb ride. I've taken quite a few tour clients
out there. I hope you paused to check out the dinosaur tracks.

> Next time, we do Top of the World. :)



You had better make her a climber first, or you'll go away with an
ex-g/f.

I have been riding with my g/f a lot lately and she's quite an
exceptional climber already for her newness to the whole thing. We
even got her first "mountain" ride in last weekend.

http://www.spokejunkies.com/forum/index.php?act=module&module=gallery&cmd=si&img=1652

JD
 
Exhaling Pleasure

In my infancy of becoming a mountain biker, I would go as far to say
that I will mature into a fine beauty (albeit looks) and ride with
modest experts, or so I hope. As I believe one has to learn how to walk
before she/he can run.

Sporting my ever so SWEET embellished hot pink helmet, riding shoes,
and cushy gloves I set out to accomplish a new experience, which I did.
Feeling as if I were a speck of sand compared to the premature Goliath
I was faced with, I am proud to admit that I impressed myself. Sure, I
felt like exchanging a greasy breakfast for an empty stomach. Yet, I
battled through it, never doubting my determination just as I have done
with many challenges I have encountered; mentally, emotionally and
physically.

Ever so grateful for having patience, understanding, and kindness on my
side, I learned that he is truly a gem. Previous experiences taught me
intimidation, as a beginner, by arrogant, pompous, self proclaimed
(quasi) experts. Needless to say, I often found myself retreating to
the scared little girl I once was, trying to do something that was
unfamiliar and foreign to me. Not defeated, rather inspired and ******
off, I pulled up my bootstraps and challenged myself, cause it IS all
about me.

Whether I walked or ran, I got there, and had someone by my side
encouraging me with selflessness, presence and unspoken word.

I have learned to embrace every challenge and envelop myself with the
pleasure of crossing the unseen finish line...whether obtained
seasoned, or as a babe in whatever I do. So, if you end up seeing a
girl walking, running, or simply a flash of pink out of the corner of
your eye engaging in battle with a mound, mountain, or monster, think
back.

Its not about the finish, its all about the journey of getting there!
 
Exhaling Pleasure

In my infancy of becoming a mountain biker, I would go as far to say
that I will mature into a fine beauty (albeit looks) and ride with
modest experts, or so I hope. As I believe one has to learn how to walk
before she/he can run.

Sporting my ever so SWEET embellished hot pink helmet, riding shoes,
and cushy gloves I set out to accomplish a new experience, which I did.
Feeling as if I were a speck of sand compared to the premature Goliath
I was faced with, I am proud to admit that I impressed myself. Sure, I
felt like exchanging a greasy breakfast for an empty stomach. I battled
through it, never doubting my determination just as I have done with
many life challenges I have encountered; mentally, emotionally and
physically.

Ever so grateful for having patience, understanding, and kindness on my
side, I learned that he is truly a gem. Previous experiences taught me
intimidation as a beginner, by arrogant, pompous, self proclaimed
(quasi) experts. Needless to say, I often found myself retreating to
the scared little girl I once was, trying to do something that was
unfamiliar and foreign to me. Not defeated, rather inspired, and ******
off, I pulled up my bootstraps and challenged myself, cause it WAS/IS
all about me.

I have accustomed myself to embrace every challenge and envelop myself
with the pleasure of crossing the unforeseeable finish line...whether
obtained seasoned, or as a babe in whatever I do, while learning the
substance of me. So, if you end up seeing a girl walking, running, or
simply a flash of pink out of the corner of your eye engaging in battle
with a mound, mountain, or monster, think back.

Whether I walked or ran, I got there, and had someone by my side
encouraging me with presence and unspoken word.

Ohhh! How succulent that Cherry was......
 
JD wrote:
> Raptor wrote:
>> I'm a modestly expert mountain biker

>
>
> I'd like to put that notion to the test some day, spinnerboy.


So would I. Hey, I did say "modest." It takes me more than two hours to
do Slickrock, after all.

>> I was looking at Sovereign, because I haven't yet done it myself and it
>> sounded pretty easy. But the dude at Slickrock Cycles said hmm, maybe
>> Klondike would be better.

>
>
> Klondike is a better newb ride. I've taken quite a few tour clients
> out there. I hope you paused to check out the dinosaur tracks.


Yes, it was perfect, but we didn't know about the dinosaur tracks. Next
time, if there is one.

>> Next time, we do Top of the World. :)

>
>
> You had better make her a climber first, or you'll go away with an
> ex-g/f.
>
> I have been riding with my g/f a lot lately and she's quite an
> exceptional climber already for her newness to the whole thing. We
> even got her first "mountain" ride in last weekend.
>
> http://www.spokejunkies.com/forum/index.php?act=module&module=gallery&cmd=si&img=1652


Cool. Mine will be a climber someday. Gotta get the power:weight ratio
fixed on both sides first, but she's got the balls for it.

--
Lynn Wallace

If FDR fought fascism the way Bush fights terrorism, we'd all be
speaking German now.
 
In my infancy of becoming a mountain biker, I would go as far to say
that I will mature into a fine beauty (albeit looks) and ride with
modest experts, or so I hope. As I believe one has to learn how to walk
before she/he can run.

Sporting my ever so SWEET embellished hot pink helmet, riding shoes,
and cushy gloves I set out to accomplish a new experience, which I did.
Feeling as if I were a speck of sand compared to the premature Goliath
I was faced with, I am proud to admit that I impressed myself. Sure, I
felt like exchanging a greasy breakfast for an empty stomach, or a
delictable bowl of fruit and oatmeal. Yet, I battled through it, never
doubting my determination just as I have done with many challenges I
have encountered; mentally, emotionally and physically.

Ever so grateful for having patience, understanding, and kindness on my
side, I learned that he is truly a gem. Previous experiences taught me
intimidation--as a beginner--by arrogant, pompous, self proclaimed
(quasi) experts. Needless to say, I often found myself retreating to
the scared little girl I once was, trying to do something that was
unfamiliar and foreign to me. Not defeated, rather inspired and ******
off, I pulled up my bootstraps and challenged myself, cause it WAS/IS
all about me.

Whether I walked or rode, I got there, and had someone by my side
encouraging me with selflessness, presence and unspoken word.

I have learned to embrace every challenge and envelop myself with the
pleasure of crossing the unseen finish lines...whether obtained
seasoned, or as a babe in whatever I do. So, if you end up seeing a
girl walking, riding, or simply a flash of pink out of the corner of
your eye engaging in battle with a mound, mountain, or monster, think
back.

Its not about the finish, its all about the journey of getting there!

Ohhh! And, how succulent that Cherry was!
 
On 28 Nov 2006 20:29:01 -0800, "black" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>In my infancy of becoming a mountain biker, I would go as far to say
>that I will mature into a fine beauty (albeit looks) and ride with
>modest experts, or so I hope. As I believe one has to learn how to walk
>before she/he can run.
>
>Sporting my ever so SWEET embellished hot pink helmet, riding shoes,
>and cushy gloves I set out to accomplish a new experience, which I did.
>Feeling as if I were a speck of sand compared to the premature Goliath
>I was faced with, I am proud to admit that I impressed myself. Sure, I
>felt like exchanging a greasy breakfast for an empty stomach, or a
>delictable bowl of fruit and oatmeal. Yet, I battled through it, never
>doubting my determination just as I have done with many challenges I
>have encountered; mentally, emotionally and physically.
>
>Ever so grateful for having patience, understanding, and kindness on my
>side, I learned that he is truly a gem. Previous experiences taught me
>intimidation--as a beginner--by arrogant, pompous, self proclaimed
>(quasi) experts. Needless to say, I often found myself retreating to
>the scared little girl I once was, trying to do something that was
>unfamiliar and foreign to me. Not defeated, rather inspired and ******
>off, I pulled up my bootstraps and challenged myself, cause it WAS/IS
>all about me.
>
>Whether I walked or rode, I got there, and had someone by my side
>encouraging me with selflessness, presence and unspoken word.
>
>I have learned to embrace every challenge and envelop myself with the
>pleasure of crossing the unseen finish lines...whether obtained
>seasoned, or as a babe in whatever I do. So, if you end up seeing a
>girl walking, riding, or simply a flash of pink out of the corner of
>your eye engaging in battle with a mound, mountain, or monster, think
>back.
>
>Its not about the finish, its all about the journey of getting there!
>
>Ohhh! And, how succulent that Cherry was!


And your selfish pleasures are all that matters, right? You are sick.
===
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
black wrote:
> Ohhh! And, how succulent that Cherry was!


Nice story, free association, daydream, inspirational rant, whatever...
:)

CDB
 
Mike Vandeman wrote:
> On 28 Nov 2006 20:29:01 -0800, "black" <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
>> In my infancy of becoming a mountain biker, I would go as far to say
>> that I will mature into a fine beauty (albeit looks) and ride with
>> modest experts, or so I hope. As I believe one has to learn how to
>> walk before she/he can run.
>>
>> Sporting my ever so SWEET embellished hot pink helmet, riding shoes,
>> and cushy gloves I set out to accomplish a new experience, which I
>> did. Feeling as if I were a speck of sand compared to the premature
>> Goliath I was faced with, I am proud to admit that I impressed
>> myself. Sure, I felt like exchanging a greasy breakfast for an empty
>> stomach, or a delictable bowl of fruit and oatmeal. Yet, I battled
>> through it, never doubting my determination just as I have done with
>> many challenges I have encountered; mentally, emotionally and
>> physically.
>>
>> Ever so grateful for having patience, understanding, and kindness on
>> my side, I learned that he is truly a gem. Previous experiences
>> taught me intimidation--as a beginner--by arrogant, pompous, self
>> proclaimed (quasi) experts. Needless to say, I often found myself
>> retreating to the scared little girl I once was, trying to do
>> something that was unfamiliar and foreign to me. Not defeated,
>> rather inspired and ****** off, I pulled up my bootstraps and
>> challenged myself, cause it WAS/IS all about me.
>>
>> Whether I walked or rode, I got there, and had someone by my side
>> encouraging me with selflessness, presence and unspoken word.
>>
>> I have learned to embrace every challenge and envelop myself with the
>> pleasure of crossing the unseen finish lines...whether obtained
>> seasoned, or as a babe in whatever I do. So, if you end up seeing a
>> girl walking, riding, or simply a flash of pink out of the corner of
>> your eye engaging in battle with a mound, mountain, or monster, think
>> back.
>>
>> Its not about the finish, its all about the journey of getting there!
>>
>> Ohhh! And, how succulent that Cherry was!

>
> And your selfish pleasures are all that matters, right? You are sick.


You forgot to ask what she's wearing.

HTH, BS (just sayin'...)
 
On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 06:16:51 GMT, "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Mike Vandeman wrote:
>> On 28 Nov 2006 20:29:01 -0800, "black" <[email protected]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> In my infancy of becoming a mountain biker, I would go as far to say
>>> that I will mature into a fine beauty (albeit looks) and ride with
>>> modest experts, or so I hope. As I believe one has to learn how to
>>> walk before she/he can run.
>>>
>>> Sporting my ever so SWEET embellished hot pink helmet, riding shoes,
>>> and cushy gloves I set out to accomplish a new experience, which I
>>> did. Feeling as if I were a speck of sand compared to the premature
>>> Goliath I was faced with, I am proud to admit that I impressed
>>> myself. Sure, I felt like exchanging a greasy breakfast for an empty
>>> stomach, or a delictable bowl of fruit and oatmeal. Yet, I battled
>>> through it, never doubting my determination just as I have done with
>>> many challenges I have encountered; mentally, emotionally and
>>> physically.
>>>
>>> Ever so grateful for having patience, understanding, and kindness on
>>> my side, I learned that he is truly a gem. Previous experiences
>>> taught me intimidation--as a beginner--by arrogant, pompous, self
>>> proclaimed (quasi) experts. Needless to say, I often found myself
>>> retreating to the scared little girl I once was, trying to do
>>> something that was unfamiliar and foreign to me. Not defeated,
>>> rather inspired and ****** off, I pulled up my bootstraps and
>>> challenged myself, cause it WAS/IS all about me.
>>>
>>> Whether I walked or rode, I got there, and had someone by my side
>>> encouraging me with selflessness, presence and unspoken word.
>>>
>>> I have learned to embrace every challenge and envelop myself with the
>>> pleasure of crossing the unseen finish lines...whether obtained
>>> seasoned, or as a babe in whatever I do. So, if you end up seeing a
>>> girl walking, riding, or simply a flash of pink out of the corner of
>>> your eye engaging in battle with a mound, mountain, or monster, think
>>> back.
>>>
>>> Its not about the finish, its all about the journey of getting there!
>>>
>>> Ohhh! And, how succulent that Cherry was!

>>
>> And your selfish pleasures are all that matters, right? You are sick.

>
>You forgot to ask what she's wearing.


Well, at least we know where YOUR mind is.

>HTH, BS (just sayin'...)
>

===
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
>You are sick.

As a matter of fact, YES. I think I am coming down with a cold.

> And your selfish pleasures are all that matters, right?
> I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to humans ("pure habitat").


Again, YES. Just as your selfish pleasure of working to create a
wildlife habitat that is off limits to humans. If it is off limits to
humans, may I ask why are you there? Moreover, who made you the
ecological/wildlife habitat police, that you feel a need to police the
internet to make snide comments? Interesting that you sit here and read
posts and reply, only to rant as well.

>(I spent the previous 8 years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)


And, as for the auto-dependence, I didn't mountain bike up a hill in my
car...on a two lane highway, right?
 
black wrote:
[...]
> Ohhh! And, how succulent that Cherry was!


Simply wonderful.

CC
 
black wrote:
> >You are sick.

>
> As a matter of fact, YES. I think I am coming down with a cold.
>
> > And your selfish pleasures are all that matters, right?
> > I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to humans ("pure habitat").

>
> Again, YES. Just as your selfish pleasure of working to create a
> wildlife habitat that is off limits to humans. If it is off limits to
> humans, may I ask why are you there? Moreover, who made you the
> ecological/wildlife habitat police, that you feel a need to police the
> internet to make snide comments? Interesting that you sit here and read
> posts and reply, only to rant as well.
>
> >(I spent the previous 8 years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

>
> And, as for the auto-dependence, I didn't mountain bike up a hill in my
> car...on a two lane highway, right?



Ummm, ignore that person. He's been posting more inane pap than the
frightpig for several years now and is almost as psychotic.

JD
 
"JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> black wrote:
> > >You are sick.

> >
> > As a matter of fact, YES. I think I am coming down with a cold.
> >
> > > And your selfish pleasures are all that matters, right?
> > > I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to humans

("pure habitat").
> >
> > Again, YES. Just as your selfish pleasure of working to create a
> > wildlife habitat that is off limits to humans. If it is off limits to
> > humans, may I ask why are you there? Moreover, who made you the
> > ecological/wildlife habitat police, that you feel a need to police the
> > internet to make snide comments? Interesting that you sit here and read
> > posts and reply, only to rant as well.
> >
> > >(I spent the previous 8 years fighting auto dependence and road

construction.)
> >
> > And, as for the auto-dependence, I didn't mountain bike up a hill in my
> > car...on a two lane highway, right?

>
>
> Ummm, ignore that person. He's been posting more inane pap than the
> frightpig for several years now and is almost as psychotic.
>


Yeah, it's fun to play with the trolls every once in awhile but it's boring
as hell when people make habits out of it.

Greg
 
"JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> black wrote:
>> >You are sick.

>>
>> As a matter of fact, YES. I think I am coming down with a cold.
>>
>> > And your selfish pleasures are all that matters, right?
>> > I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to humans
>> > ("pure habitat").

>>
>> Again, YES. Just as your selfish pleasure of working to create a
>> wildlife habitat that is off limits to humans. If it is off limits to
>> humans, may I ask why are you there? Moreover, who made you the
>> ecological/wildlife habitat police, that you feel a need to police the
>> internet to make snide comments? Interesting that you sit here and read
>> posts and reply, only to rant as well.
>>
>> >(I spent the previous 8 years fighting auto dependence and road
>> >construction.)

>>
>> And, as for the auto-dependence, I didn't mountain bike up a hill in my
>> car...on a two lane highway, right?

>
>
> Ummm, ignore that person. He's been posting more inane pap than the
> frightpig for several years now and is almost as psychotic.
>
> JD
>


coming from you that is indde high praise.....too bad no one really cares
about your opinion
 
"G.T." <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>>
>> black wrote:
>> > >You are sick.
>> >
>> > As a matter of fact, YES. I think I am coming down with a cold.
>> >
>> > > And your selfish pleasures are all that matters, right?
>> > > I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
>> > > humans

> ("pure habitat").
>> >
>> > Again, YES. Just as your selfish pleasure of working to create a
>> > wildlife habitat that is off limits to humans. If it is off limits to
>> > humans, may I ask why are you there? Moreover, who made you the
>> > ecological/wildlife habitat police, that you feel a need to police the
>> > internet to make snide comments? Interesting that you sit here and read
>> > posts and reply, only to rant as well.
>> >
>> > >(I spent the previous 8 years fighting auto dependence and road

> construction.)
>> >
>> > And, as for the auto-dependence, I didn't mountain bike up a hill in my
>> > car...on a two lane highway, right?

>>
>>
>> Ummm, ignore that person. He's been posting more inane pap than the
>> frightpig for several years now and is almost as psychotic.
>>

>
> Yeah, it's fun to play with the trolls every once in awhile but it's
> boring
> as hell when people make habits out of it.
>
> Greg


yep, that's whay I like pulling his chain...cuz it seems to me he's the
biggest troll in the batch....


now kindly remove your nose from his anus would you...it doesnt become you!
 
Dave W wrote:
> "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> >
> >
> > Ummm, ignore that person. He's been posting more inane pap than the
> > frightpig for several years now and is almost as psychotic.
> >
> > JD
> >

>
> coming from you that is indde high praise.....too bad no one really cares
> about your opinion


And here we have, folks, a textbook example of "projection."

TYVM.

E.P.
 
On 29 Nov 2006 13:30:39 -0800, "black" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>>You are sick.

>
>As a matter of fact, YES. I think I am coming down with a cold.
>
>> And your selfish pleasures are all that matters, right?
>> I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to humans ("pure habitat").

>
>Again, YES. Just as your selfish pleasure of working to create a
>wildlife habitat that is off limits to humans.


Protecting wildlife is the OPPOSITE of selfishness. Another name for
it is "compassion".

If it is off limits to
>humans, may I ask why are you there?


I'm not.

Moreover, who made you the
>ecological/wildlife habitat police,


SOMEBODY needs to do it, since mountain bikers won't. All they care
about is their own selfish pleasures.

that you feel a need to police the
>internet to make snide comments? Interesting that you sit here and read
>posts and reply, only to rant as well.
>
>>(I spent the previous 8 years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

>
>And, as for the auto-dependence, I didn't mountain bike up a hill in my
>car...on a two lane highway, right?

===
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande