RR: More Single Speeding

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bill Wheeler, Feb 22, 2004.

  1. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    After a much heated debate about Single Speeding, I feel there is need to clear the air a bit. I
    promise not to preach.

    Myth number 1: SS bikes(ers) are slower than multi-geared bikes.

    Anybody who has half a brain will be able to tell you it's the rider that makes the bike go faster
    or slower...'nuff said.

    Myth number 2: SS bikes take no more skill to ride than multi-geared bikes rigid or not rigid. Fully
    rigid meaning no mechanical suspension.

    It takes improved skills when riding a fully rigid SS on technical terrain. You need to be much more
    precise about picking your line. For example on a geared suspension bike you would be more likely to
    rely on a lower gear and the front suspension to simply roll over obstacles that may be in your way,
    knowing full well that the front sus. will cushion any shock that my throw the bike off line
    otherwise.

    A rigid SS on the other hand doesn't afford you that same luxury. If you do need to go over the
    obstacle you need to use your body parts like your arms and legs to act as your suspension. If
    you don't improve those skills not only will you go off-line but you will wear out your body
    very quickly.

    I'm not saying that people who ride suspension bikes don't have this skill but I am saying
    that people who ride rigid bikes will most likely <== "most likely" have improved skills in
    this category.

    Now for the gears, going up a steep technical area with gears you have the option of gearing down
    ... mechanically. A lot of time this will help save your energy, eliminate wheel spin, and generally
    make life easier. A SS on the other hand doesn't afford you that same luxury. In this example lets
    say momentum is not a factor. You still must gear down....But how? Physically, that's how. Without
    the option of gears you'll need to use your balance (fore and aft) and lighten up your pedal stroke.
    You need to be able to go from hammering to feathering like you're riding on rice paper, it's all
    within you no mechanical help. For me this is one of the hardest things to do without gears.

    I'm not saying that people who ride geared bikes don't have this skill but I am saying that people
    who ride SS bikes will most likely <== "most likely" have improved skills in this category.

    This is getting long but now let's throw momentum into the mix.

    To get up hills quickly on a geared bike, again you can rely on mechanically going into a lower gear
    to keep up an efficient cadence to get to the top of the hill asap.

    A SS on the other hand may take a bit more planning (planning is a skill) You will need to carry
    your momentum into the hill to minimize the burn you'll be feeling at when you crest. Also,
    depending on the size of the hill momentum may mean absolutely nothing, so you'll be depending on
    your leg strength and aerobic capacity to get you through.

    I'm not saying that people who ride geared bikes don't have this skill but I am saying that people
    who ride SS bikes will most likely <== "most likely" have improved skills in this category.

    Leg strength and aerobic capacity can be categorized as a skill.

    I had a great ride today, conditions where terrible...go figure, but I still learned something,...it
    was a good day.

    Peace, Bill

    The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind should give
    an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
    Tags:


  2. Mojo Deluxe

    Mojo Deluxe Guest

  3. "Bill Wheeler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > After a much heated debate about Single Speeding, I feel there is need to clear the air a bit. I
    > promise not to preach.
    >
    > Myth number 1: SS bikes(ers) are slower than multi-geared bikes.
    >
    > Anybody who has half a brain will be able to tell you it's the rider that makes the bike go faster
    > or slower...'nuff said.

    For the most part.

    However, there are plenty of trails/trail sections where an SS rider doesn't have a choice between
    going faster or slower, since they have to walk. Not because of their skills or fitness, but due to
    the terrain.
     
  4. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    mojo deluxe wrote:

    > <SNIP>
    >
    > My first mountain bike was like my ex, fully rigid.

    I realise you have different customs in the Deep South, but most people bury their partners
    after death.

    My first bike was red, fast and wore rubber...
     
  5. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Bill Wheeler wrote:

    > I'm not saying that people who ride geared bikes don't have this skill but I am saying that people
    > who ride SS bikes will most likely <== "most likely" have improved skills in this category.

    Fair points.

    > Leg strength and aerobic capacity can be categorized as a skill.

    Disagree.

    > I had a great ride today, conditions where terrible...go figure, but I still learned
    > something,...it was a good day.

    I had a good ride yesterday on La Conasse with new, spiffy Middleburn Uno's.
     
  6. Mojo Deluxe

    Mojo Deluxe Guest

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > mojo deluxe wrote:
    >
    > > <SNIP>
    > >
    > > My first mountain bike was like my ex, fully rigid.
    >
    > I realise you have different customs in the Deep South, but most people bury their partners
    > after death.
    >
    lol

    > My first bike was red, fast and wore rubber...
    >
    Mine was blue.
     
  7. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 16:57:08 -0600, mojo deluxe wrote:
    >
    > "Bill Wheeler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    ><SNIP>
    >
    > My first mountain bike was like my ex, fully rigid.

    So was mine, but I found a way to put a little bounce in her front end. She's still around; kinda
    grey, but then she always was.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  8. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 22:57:47 GMT, "p e t e f a g e r l i n"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Bill Wheeler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> After a much heated debate about Single Speeding, I feel there is need to clear the air a bit. I
    >> promise not to preach.
    >>
    >> Myth number 1: SS bikes(ers) are slower than multi-geared bikes.
    >>
    >> Anybody who has half a brain will be able to tell you it's the rider that makes the bike go
    >> faster or slower...'nuff said.
    >
    >For the most part.
    >
    >However, there are plenty of trails/trail sections where an SS rider doesn't have a choice between
    >going faster or slower, since they have to walk. Not because of their skills or fitness, but due to
    >the terrain.
    >

    true, bill

    The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind should give
    an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
  9. Mojo Deluxe

    Mojo Deluxe Guest

    "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 16:57:08 -0600, mojo deluxe wrote:
    > >
    > > "Bill Wheeler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > ><SNIP>
    > >
    > > My first mountain bike was like my ex, fully rigid.
    >
    > So was mine, but I found a way to put a little bounce in her front end. She's still around; kinda
    > grey, but then she always was.
    >
    Mine was not worth investing anything into. It was way too big for me.
     
  10. Ride-A-Lot

    Ride-A-Lot Guest

    Bill Wheeler wrote:
    > After a much heated debate about Single Speeding, I feel there is need to clear the air a bit. I
    > promise not to preach.
    >
    > Myth number 1: SS bikes(ers) are slower than multi-geared bikes.
    >
    > Anybody who has half a brain will be able to tell you it's the rider that makes the bike go faster
    > or slower...'nuff said.
    >
    > Myth number 2: SS bikes take no more skill to ride than multi-geared bikes rigid or not rigid.
    > Fully rigid meaning no mechanical suspension.
    >
    > It takes improved skills when riding a fully rigid SS on technical terrain. You need to be much
    > more precise about picking your line. For example on a geared suspension bike you would be more
    > likely to rely on a lower gear and the front suspension to simply roll over obstacles that may be
    > in your way, knowing full well that the front sus. will cushion any shock that my throw the bike
    > off line otherwise.
    <SNIP>

    Uh... Was there a ride report in there somewhere? Is this a new scam? Put RR and then minister us on
    the joys of SSing? I don't mind reading your rants, but at least give me warning of what to expect.

    --
    o-o-o-o Ride-A-Lot o-o-o-o
    www.schnauzers.ws
     
  11. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    "p e t e f a g e r l i n" <[email protected]> had
    this to say news:[email protected]

    >
    > "Bill Wheeler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> After a much heated debate about Single Speeding, I feel there is need to clear the air a bit. I
    >> promise not to preach.
    >>
    >> Myth number 1: SS bikes(ers) are slower than multi-geared bikes.
    >>
    >> Anybody who has half a brain will be able to tell you it's the rider that makes the bike go
    >> faster or slower...'nuff said.
    >
    > For the most part.
    >
    > However, there are plenty of trails/trail sections where an SS rider doesn't have a choice between
    > going faster or slower, since they have to walk. Not because of their skills or fitness, but due
    > to the terrain.
    >
    >

    Here's some now:

    http://community.webshots.com/photo/120249685/120252158AGlMYf
     
  12. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 01:50:45 -0000, Dave W wrote:

    > http://community.webshots.com/photo/120249685/120252158AGlMYf

    Nope, definitely not that! I've seen more difficult climbs ridden by by an SSer - you'd be shocked
    (I was). The kind of terrain that would be a problem for an SSer is probably more like extended
    steep climbs. One can only stand on the pedals for so long.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  13. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

  14. Per Löwdin

    Per Löwdin Guest

    > Myth number 1: SS bikes(ers) are slower than multi-geared bikes.

    Sure, you just have be stronger (at times a lot stronger) for steep ascents, and conserve your
    momentum better.

    > Myth number 2: SS bikes take no more skill to ride than multi-geared bikes rigid or not rigid.
    > Fully rigid meaning no mechanical suspension.

    Well, a competely rigid bike is the most difficult or technically demanding to ride as you have to
    be able to lighten it and sneak it over a lot of things the suspension would soak up.
    >
    > It takes improved skills when riding a fully rigid SS on technical terrain. You need to be much
    > more precise about picking your line.

    Yes, because if you lose momentum it is hard to get it back again.

    > Now for the gears, going up a steep technical area with gears you have the option of gearing down
    > ... mechanically. A lot of time this will help save your energy, eliminate wheel spin, and
    > generally make life easier.

    On the other hand, riding really technical stuff I rarely use the lowest gears, because a high
    cadence spoils the balance. Of course it varies with what the obstacles are but I typically clear
    difficult bits on the middle ring and the second larges cog in the rear.

    In any case one day I will convert one of my better old MTBs to SS and give it a go.

    Per http://lowdin.nu
     
  15. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    bomba <[email protected]> had this to say
    news:[email protected]

    > Dave W wrote:
    >
    >> Here's some now:
    >>
    >> http://community.webshots.com/photo/120249685/120252158AGlMYf
    >
    > Depends on the preceding terrain. With enough momentum that looks rideable.
    >
    >

    Ah, but there's the rub. The preceding terrain is loose, SANDY, and rutty from the heavy use by
    motos. Here's an example of some of it;

    http://community.webshots.com/photo/120249685/120252987zuCQuH

    Also, there are several "chute" runs where you are literally 2-3 feet below the surface, riding in
    ravines. (for lack of a better term.)

    Dave
     
  16. Per Löwdin

    Per Löwdin Guest

    > Depends on the preceding terrain. With enough momentum that looks
    rideable.

    Very much so, if the roots were wet and slippery it might be a bit challenging.

    Per http://lowdin.nu
     
  17. Paladin

    Paladin Guest

    "p e t e f a g e r l i n" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Bill Wheeler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > After a much heated debate about Single Speeding, I feel there is need to clear the air a bit. I
    > > promise not to preach.
    > >
    > > Myth number 1: SS bikes(ers) are slower than multi-geared bikes.
    > >
    > > Anybody who has half a brain will be able to tell you it's the rider that makes the bike go
    > > faster or slower...'nuff said.
    >
    > For the most part.
    >
    > However, there are plenty of trails/trail sections where an SS rider doesn't have a choice between
    > going faster or slower, since they have to walk. Not because of their skills or fitness, but due
    > to the terrain.

    Your older friend on the SC SS seemed to be an exception to the rule, though. I'm still amazed at
    his riding the waterfall on a fully rigid SS.

    paladin
     
  18. Paladin

    Paladin Guest

    Bill Wheeler <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > After a much heated debate about Single Speeding, I feel there is need to clear the air a bit. I
    > promise not to preach.

    Here are my *opinions* after 4 or 5 yrs SS'ing about 70% of the time, considering a constant factor
    in the test sample (me) and how it plays out:
    >
    > Myth number 1: SS bikes(ers) are slower than multi-geared bikes.

    Up Hill faster. Down hill, slower.
    >
    > Anybody who has half a brain will be able to tell you it's the rider that makes the bike go faster
    > or slower...'nuff said.
    >
    > Myth number 2: SS bikes take no more skill to ride than multi-geared bikes rigid or not rigid.
    > Fully rigid meaning no mechanical suspension.
    >
    SS takes more skill. Have to work the terrain, choose a line, access more upperbody and other
    muscles, avoid endo's.

    > It takes improved skills when riding a fully rigid SS on technical terrain. You need to be much
    > more precise about picking your line. For example on a geared suspension bike you would be more
    > likely to rely on a lower gear and the front suspension to simply roll over obstacles that may be
    > in your way, knowing full well that the front sus. will cushion any shock that my throw the bike
    > off line otherwise.
    >
    > A rigid SS on the other hand doesn't afford you that same luxury. If you do need to go over the
    > obstacle you need to use your body parts like your arms and legs to act as your suspension. If you
    > don't improve those skills not only will you go off-line but you will wear out your body very
    > quickly.
    >
    > I'm not saying that people who ride suspension bikes don't have this skill but I am saying that
    > people who ride rigid bikes will most likely <== "most likely" have improved skills in this
    > category.
    >
    > Now for the gears, going up a steep technical area with gears you have the option of gearing down
    > ... mechanically. A lot of time this will help save your energy, eliminate wheel spin, and
    > generally make life easier. A SS on the other hand doesn't afford you that same luxury. In this
    > example lets say momentum is not a factor. You still must gear down....But how? Physically, that's
    > how. Without the option of gears you'll need to use your balance (fore and aft) and lighten up
    > your pedal stroke. You need to be able to go from hammering to feathering like you're riding on
    > rice paper, it's all within you no mechanical help. For me this is one of the hardest things to do
    > without gears.
    >
    > I'm not saying that people who ride geared bikes don't have this skill but I am saying that people
    > who ride SS bikes will most likely <== "most likely" have improved skills in this category.
    >
    > This is getting long but now let's throw momentum into the mix.
    >
    > To get up hills quickly on a geared bike, again you can rely on mechanically going into a lower
    > gear to keep up an efficient cadence to get to the top of the hill asap.
    >
    > A SS on the other hand may take a bit more planning (planning is a skill) You will need to carry
    > your momentum into the hill to minimize the burn you'll be feeling at when you crest. Also,
    > depending on the size of the hill momentum may mean absolutely nothing, so you'll be depending on
    > your leg strength and aerobic capacity to get you through.

    Don't discount upper body strength needed for prolonged, steep climbing. I'm sometimes sore in my
    shoulders, traps, lats, etc. after a long SS ride.
    >
    > I'm not saying that people who ride geared bikes don't have this skill but I am saying that people
    > who ride SS bikes will most likely <== "most likely" have improved skills in this category.
    >
    > Leg strength and aerobic capacity can be categorized as a skill.

    I don't class them as a "skill" per se, but to each his own.

    So, there's 2c from an average Joe who likes riding the SS.

    paladin
    >
    > I had a great ride today, conditions where terrible...go figure, but I still learned
    > something,...it was a good day.
    >
    > Peace, Bill
    >
    >
    > The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind should
    > give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    > :-]
     
  19. Miles Todd

    Miles Todd Guest

    Paladin wrote:

    >
    > Up Hill faster. Down hill, slower. paladin
    >

    I haven't really noticed that single speeds are any slower on downhills except for the rare more-flat-than-
    downhill pedaling sections. Those suck on a SS. Completely flat, wide-open sections suck, too,
    because the gearies can simply shift up and motor away. Real downhills, though, are fast on a SS.

    Miles
     
  20. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On 23 Feb 2004 09:49:33 -0800, Paladin wrote:

    > Up Hill faster. Down hill, slower.

    Then why was JD out front when the rest of us were going as fast as we felt was (somewhat) safe?

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
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