RR: Overanalyzing

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bb, May 22, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Bb

    Bb Guest

    It all started on the first downhill. "What am I forgetting?" I just *knew* I was forgetting
    something. Maybe it was because it happens so frequently this early in the season. I blazed down the
    entry road, thinking about how I could go faster on a bike than in a vehicle since I can just
    bunny-hop over the ruts.

    Then I reached the trailhead - big puddle at pass-thru. Sloshed thick mud all over my left leg. Hit
    some more mudholes - more mud splattered on the left leg, but somehow the right leg remained clean
    and lilly-white (as is typical of Western Oregon). It was beginning to get comical - should I get a
    picture of this? Do I *really* want to post a picture of my legs?

    Hit some long dry runs - fantastic. Maybe the big climb will be dry. Its such a pain trying to get
    up steep sections when they're covered with wet mossy gravel. It'll be nice to get up that part
    without having to stop (its only about a 300' climb, over 1/2 mile or so).

    Then it hit me - I was analyzing this way too much. Travis quickly came to mind, and how he tends to
    over-think ever aspect of riding. One of the joys of mountain biking is how you can let your
    instincts take over, and at the very least take it one section at a time.

    I hit the climb with a new attitude. I ground my way up familiar turns, and held back as needed to
    power up the steeps. OK, I did stop once - I have nothing to prove to anyone (its not like there's
    anyone ELSE out climbing this)! The hill seemed to go by very quickly this time.

    Then it was a breezy fireroad cruise. This affords a lot of opportunities to just look around and
    enjoy the lush greenery. Soon was at the bottom of the next climb. This tends to be the "tough
    climb" for most riders, as they avoid the part of the park with the really steep stuff.

    The local MTB group (Portland United Mountain Peddlers - PUMP) arrived en masse at the same time, so
    I stopped waited for them to start their chug up the long hill. It was quite a gaggle, but not MY
    gaggle. Guess I'm more of an independent - a Portland Independent Mountain Peddler. After a quick
    giggle about that acronym, I was off.

    Vowing to just maintain a good spin and not try to analyze ever section, I caught up to and passed
    about 1/4 of the group. At least let me know I'm not totally out of shape. I breezed past the rest
    of the group catching their breath at the top. Its hard to resist the temptation to hammer around
    other riders. Just competitive spirit, I guess. I really just prefer to ride for fun.

    And as it turned out, I hadn't forgetten anything.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
    Tags:


  2. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On 22 May 2003 18:42:09 GMT, BB <[email protected]> wrote:
    >One of the joys of mountain biking is how you can let your instincts take over, and at the very
    >least take it one section at a time.

    so true

    >And as it turned out, I hadn't forgetten anything.

    Nice! Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind
    should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...