Rugging up for winter

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Euan B Uk, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. Euan B Uk

    Euan B Uk Guest

    The colder months will soon be upon us and it'll be my first
    winter cycling.

    I'm pretty much sorted clothing wise for everything except
    my feet, you don't get much wind chill running or hiking so
    it's never been an issue before. One thing I learned early
    on in life though is that cold feet equals misery.

    So what's the best way of keeping the tootsies frost free?
    Do I need winter shoes, over shoes or something completely
    different?
    --
    Cheers
    Euan
     
    Tags:


  2. Joel Mayes

    Joel Mayes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
    > The colder months will soon be upon us and it'll be my
    > first winter cycling.
    >
    > I'm pretty much sorted clothing wise for everything except
    > my feet, you don't get much wind chill running or hiking
    > so it's never been an issue before. One thing I learned
    > early on in life though is that cold feet equals misery.
    >
    > So what's the best way of keeping the tootsies frost free?
    > Do I need winter shoes, over shoes or something completely
    > different?

    I just wear big thick wooly socks with plain Shimano SPD-R
    MTB shoes and that works for me.

    --
    | Joel Mayes | /~\ ASCII Ribbon campaign Accordionist | \_/
    | stop HTML mail and news Musician | / \ Music Teacher |
     
  3. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "Joel Mayes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > I'm pretty much sorted clothing wise for everything
    > > except my feet, you don't get much wind chill running or
    > > hiking so it's never been an issue before. One thing I
    > > learned early on in life though is that cold feet equals
    > > misery.
    > >
    > > So what's the best way of keeping the tootsies frost
    > > free? Do I need winter shoes, over shoes or something
    > > completely different?
    >
    > I just wear big thick wooly socks with plain Shimano SPD-R
    > MTB shoes and that works for me.

    This can apparently cause reduced circulation which leads
    to chilled/numb feet. Typically I suffer, but when I have
    my wits about me, I try to put on my toe warmers. These
    are little adidas? neoprene covers for the front part of
    your shoe - reduces the wind and water getting in.. I've
    never tried full "booties" though. They seem a bit too..
    um... wanky ;-)

    hippy I'm sure I'll learn...
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:

    > The colder months will soon be upon us and it'll be my
    > first winter cycling.
    >
    > I'm pretty much sorted clothing wise for everything except
    > my feet, you don't get much wind chill running or hiking
    > so it's never been an issue before. One thing I learned
    > early on in life though is that cold feet equals misery.
    >
    > So what's the best way of keeping the tootsies frost free?
    > Do I need winter shoes, over shoes or something completely
    > different?

    Depends on how long your ride is. I used to ride the 8kms
    home and it didn't matter how cold it was, because I was
    only a short time away. Still, the rain can make your feet
    very wet, and that can result in very cold toes. I'ld
    suggest something waterproof for feet (I've read of people
    using milk bottle halves over their feet - I just use them
    as splash guards on my mudguards, and under the bottom
    bracket to protect the axle and shifter cables).

    dale

    --
    [email protected]
     
  5. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "Dale Stanbrough" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:MrNoSpam-
    > Depends on how long your ride is. I used to ride the 8kms
    > home and it didn't matter how cold it was, because I was
    > only a short time away. Still, the rain can make your feet
    > very wet, and that can result in very cold toes. I'ld
    > suggest something waterproof for feet (I've read of people
    > using milk bottle halves over their feet - I just use them
    > as splash guards on my mudguards, and under the bottom
    > bracket to protect the axle and shifter cables).

    I saw a guy riding with plastic bags taped over his feet...
    come on, neoprene ain't that expensive :p

    My actual point... Even if it is a short ride, shoe covers
    of some sort could be useful in keeping your cycling shoes
    dry. Nothing so bad as putting on wet gear the next day!

    hippy
     
  6. Ray

    Ray Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > "Dale Stanbrough" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:MrNoSpam-
    > > Depends on how long your ride is. I used to ride the
    > > 8kms home and it didn't matter how cold it was, because
    > > I was only a short time away. Still, the rain can make
    > > your feet very wet, and that can result in very cold
    > > toes. I'ld suggest something waterproof for feet (I've
    > > read of people using milk bottle halves over their feet
    > > - I just use them as splash guards on my mudguards, and
    > > under the bottom bracket to protect the axle and shifter
    > > cables).
    >
    > I saw a guy riding with plastic bags taped over his
    > feet... come on, neoprene ain't that expensive :p
    >
    > My actual point... Even if it is a short ride, shoe covers
    > of some sort could be useful in keeping your cycling shoes
    > dry. Nothing so bad as putting on wet gear the next day!
    >

    Nothing worse than wet gear at the end of the day!

    Next day is usually no problem as I invested in a clothes
    dryer with a shoe rack and auto-sensing. Works great.

    My order of extremity protection priority:
    1/ Gloves - feels like chinese bamboo torture under the
    finger nails
    2/ Ears - headache city
    3/ Shoes - just because they get cold eventually
     
  7. Jess

    Jess Guest

    I got two ways...

    My Louie Garneau? shoes come with 2 footbeds - a summer one
    which has lots of ventilation holes...but also comes with a
    winter one which is a bit thicker and has not as much
    ventilation....

    If that doesnt work well - ill just get cover thingos for
    my shoes....

    I wont be riding outdoors too much during winter anyway -
    will be back in spinning for 3 months (no weekend riding -
    too busy skiing!)
     
  8. Ritch

    Ritch Guest

    "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Dale Stanbrough" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:MrNoSpam-
    > > Depends on how long your ride is. I used to ride the
    > > 8kms home and it didn't matter how cold it was, because
    > > I was only a short time away. Still, the rain can make
    > > your feet very wet, and that can result in very cold
    > > toes. I'ld suggest something waterproof for feet (I've
    > > read of people using milk bottle halves over their feet
    > > - I just use them as splash guards on my mudguards, and
    > > under the bottom bracket to protect the axle and shifter
    > > cables).
    >
    > I saw a guy riding with plastic bags taped over his
    > feet... come on, neoprene ain't that expensive :p
    >
    > My actual point... Even if it is a short ride, shoe covers
    > of some sort could be useful in keeping your cycling shoes
    > dry. Nothing so bad as putting on wet gear the next day!
    >
    > hippy

    Waterproof booties are good against spray from a wet road
    and they help keep your feet warm. My pair are useless
    against a tropical downpour because water runs down the leg
    and into the shoes...

    The best thing for warmth is to keep your torso warm. As you
    get colder, the body spends more effort in keeping your head
    and chest warm and lets your extremities get cold. Keep your
    head and chest warm and you'll find that your extremities
    don't need so much rugging up.

    Free advice - proof that you get what you pay for... Ritch
     
  9. Hitchy

    Hitchy New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,876
    Likes Received:
    0

    G'day,

    'Cold' & 'wet' need to be treated differently. 'Cold' you can dress for. invest in a good quality 'wind vest'. The type that zip up at the front & are quite thick on the front. The back is often 'netting' type material to let heat escape. Naturally arm & leg warmers are a must. Over shoes will keep the feet warm. Mine cover the shoe & velcro around the heel......Wet is another matter, there is no such thing as waterproof shoes or covers, they all leak, all will allow some moisture in, be it from the top or the bottom.....get used to wet feet if you're riding in winter,

    cheers,

    Hitchy (only 265 days till Summer)
     
  10. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Joel Mayes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I'm pretty much sorted clothing wise for everything
    > > > except my feet,
    you
    > > > don't get much wind chill running or hiking so it's
    > > > never been an
    issue
    > > > before. One thing I learned early on in life though is
    > > > that cold feet equals misery.
    > > >
    > > > So what's the best way of keeping the tootsies frost
    > > > free? Do I need winter shoes, over shoes or something
    > > > completely different?
    > >
    > > I just wear big thick wooly socks with plain Shimano SPD-
    > > R MTB shoes and that works for me.
    >
    > This can apparently cause reduced circulation which leads
    > to chilled/numb feet. Typically I suffer, but when I have
    > my wits about me, I try to put on my toe warmers. These
    > are little adidas? neoprene covers for the front part of
    > your shoe - reduces the wind and water getting in.. I've
    > never tried full "booties" though. They seem a bit too..
    > um... wanky ;-)
    >
    > hippy I'm sure I'll learn...
    >
    >

    hey... who you calling wanky. I wear full overshoes that
    have rubber soles from Dean Woods. They keep my shoes dry
    for that hour long train commute I do after my 21k ride to
    the station. I had some really expensive ones but they were
    crap for keeping me dry but did still keep them warm.
     
  11. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "Ritch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Dale Stanbrough" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > message
    news:MrNoSpam-
    > > > Depends on how long your ride is. I used to ride the
    > > > 8kms home and it didn't matter how cold it was,
    > > > because I was only a short time away. Still, the rain
    > > > can make your feet very wet, and that can result in
    > > > very cold toes. I'ld suggest something waterproof for
    > > > feet (I've read of people using milk bottle halves
    > > > over their feet - I just use them as splash guards on
    > > > my mudguards, and under the bottom bracket to protect
    > > > the axle and shifter cables).
    > >
    > > I saw a guy riding with plastic bags taped over his
    > > feet... come on, neoprene ain't that expensive :p
    > >
    > > My actual point... Even if it is a short ride, shoe
    > > covers of some sort could be useful in keeping your
    > > cycling shoes dry. Nothing so bad as putting on wet gear
    > > the next day!
    > >
    > > hippy
    >
    > Waterproof booties are good against spray from a wet road
    > and they help keep your feet warm. My pair are useless
    > against a tropical downpour because water runs down the
    > leg and into the shoes...
    >
    > The best thing for warmth is to keep your torso warm. As
    > you get colder, the body spends more effort in keeping
    > your head and chest warm and lets your extremities get
    > cold. Keep your head and chest warm and you'll find that
    > your extremities don't need so much rugging up.
    >
    > Free advice - proof that you get what you pay for... Ritch

    I stop the run into the shoes with the down pour with the
    rain pants. They go right down over the booty cuff and then
    I strap them to it using elastic. The rain pants are bright
    yellow. Hey I am not one to care about looking cool. They
    have reflective strips and look postively wanky but I am
    dry and seen.
     
  12. Bjay

    Bjay Guest

    > I stop the run into the shoes with the down pour with the
    > rain pants.
    They
    > go right down over the booty cuff and then I strap them to
    > it using
    elastic.
    > The rain pants are bright yellow. Hey I am not one to care
    > about looking cool. They have reflective strips and look
    > postively wanky but I am dry
    and
    > seen.
    >

    I agree, after experiencing hypothermia from riding for
    a couple hours in cold, windy constantly raining
    weather because I wasn't wearing waterproof clothing,
    only water resistant, I would rather be waterproof and
    look wanky any day!

    In my humble experience, most bike wet weather gear does not
    keep you dry in seriously wet and cold conditions and you
    are out for a long while. In these situations you gotta have
    something like a Gortex jacket with hood (under the helmet)
    wich seals around the wrist and neck and plenty of warm
    stuff around your torso, waterproof pants which seal firmly
    at the ankle, rubber gloves under your full finger riding
    gloves (like surgery or catering gloves), warm socks and
    plastic bags over your socks, inside the shoes, (if only
    they made rubber surgery socks!) overshoes if you got them.
    You sweat like a pig, but you stay pretty warm!
     
  13. Peter Vesel

    Peter Vesel Guest

    "John Doe" <[email protected]> wrote in message >

    hey... who you calling wanky. I wear full overshoes that
    have rubber soles
    > from Dean Woods. They keep my shoes dry for that hour long
    > train commute
    I
    > do after my 21k ride to the station. I had some really
    > expensive ones but they were crap for keeping me dry but
    > did still keep them warm.
    >

    I've got the same ones and I reckon they're not bad either.
    It's not till you take them off that you realise how warm
    you feet were

    Peter
     
  14. Balthasar

    Balthasar Guest

    "John Doe" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    This is exactly what I do as well...better dry and warm feet
    than looking cool ;)

    > I stop the run into the shoes with the down pour with the
    > rain pants. They go right down over the booty cuff and
    > then I strap them to it using elastic. The rain pants are
    > bright yellow. Hey I am not one to care about looking
    > cool. They have reflective strips and look postively wanky
    > but I am dry and seen.
     
  15. hippy

    hippy New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2003
    Messages:
    1,806
    Likes Received:
    0
    So you rode in Around the Bay in a Day last year as well? :)

    hippy
     
  16. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "John Doe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > I've never tried full "booties" though. They seem a bit
    > > too.. um... wanky ;-)
    > >
    > > hippy
    >
    > hey... who you calling wanky. I wear full overshoes that
    > have rubber
    soles
    > from Dean Woods. They keep my shoes dry for that hour long
    > train commute
    I
    > do after my 21k ride to the station. I had some really
    > expensive ones but they were crap for keeping me dry but
    > did still keep them warm.

    I'm thinking about those lycra TT-style booties that "fast"
    people wear... :)

    hippy
     
  17. Joel Mayes

    Joel Mayes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, hippy wrote:
    > "Joel Mayes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> > I'm pretty much sorted clothing wise for everything
    >> > except my feet, you don't get much wind chill running
    >> > or hiking so it's never been an issue before. One thing
    >> > I learned early on in life though is that cold feet
    >> > equals misery.
    >> >
    >> > So what's the best way of keeping the tootsies frost
    >> > free? Do I need winter shoes, over shoes or something
    >> > completely different?
    >>
    >> I just wear big thick wooly socks with plain Shimano SPD-
    >> R MTB shoes and that works for me.
    >
    > This can apparently cause reduced circulation which leads
    > to chilled/numb feet. Typically I suffer, but when I have
    > my wits about me, I try to put on my toe warmers. These
    > are little adidas? neoprene covers for the front part of
    > your shoe - reduces the wind and water getting in.. I've
    > never tried full "booties" though. They seem a bit too..
    > um... wanky ;-)
    >
    > hippy I'm sure I'll learn...

    I've never had a problem with numb toes, even on long rides,
    which I guess is pretty lucky. My bigest problem is with my
    hand if I don't ride without good gloves I my pinky fingers
    are numb for a while at the end of even a short ride.

    --
    | Joel Mayes | /~\ ASCII Ribbon campaign Accordionist | \_/
    | stop HTML mail and news Musician | / \ Music Teacher |
     
  18. Jeff Jones

    Jeff Jones Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > The colder months will soon be upon us and it'll be my
    > first winter cycling.
    >
    > I'm pretty much sorted clothing wise for everything except
    > my feet, you don't get much wind chill running or hiking
    > so it's never been an issue before. One thing I learned
    > early on in life though is that cold feet equals misery.
    >
    > So what's the best way of keeping the tootsies frost free?
    > Do I need winter shoes, over shoes or something completely
    > different?
    >
    As everyone else has said, neoprene booties are the go. I've
    got a pair of thin, but warmish ones, for when it's cold (-5
    - 10 deg.) and some more waterproof ones for when it's
    raining/snowing. Sometimes I even rub thick warmup oil on my
    feet which tends to help stave off the biting cold.

    Hands are very important too: I've got some thick neoprene
    gloves that I wear in the mornings, and usually it takes
    about 5 km for my hands to warm up after the first shock of
    getting outside. If I go out later, then I normally wear a
    pair of normal lycra gloves with some Danish bricklayers
    gloves over the top, so you can take them off if it gets too
    warm. They're a bit like cricket inner gloves. I used to
    wear woollen mittens, which were ok until you inevitably put
    a hole in them.

    I normally wear three layers on top (undershirt/short
    sleeved jersey/thermal long sleeve jacket) and that's
    generally good enough for me. If it's wet then I make sure I
    wear something woollen, as it seems to keep the warmth in
    even when I'm soaking wet. For legs, I just use leg warmers
    + bib shorts, no matter how cold it is. Your legs still have
    to move a lot.

    Also this year I've started wearing a headband underneath my
    helmet that covers the ears, which is fantastic because I
    hate frozen ears.

    cheers, Jeff
    p.s. I live in Belgium for most of the year
     
  19. Daveb

    Daveb Guest

    > hey... who you calling wanky. I wear full overshoes that
    > have rubber soles from Dean Woods. They keep my shoes dry
    > for that hour long train commute I do after my 21k ride to
    > the station. I had some really expensive ones but they
    > were crap for keeping me dry but did still keep them warm.
    >
    >
    >

    Are those shoes from Dean Woods any good for going over
    runners or are they only suitabel for bike shoes?

    DaveB.
     
  20. Rickster

    Rickster Guest

    "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Joel Mayes" <[email protected]lid.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I'm pretty much sorted clothing wise for everything
    > > > except my feet, you don't get much wind chill running
    > > > or hiking so it's never been an issue before. One
    > > > thing I learned early on in life though is that cold
    > > > feet equals misery.
    > > >
    > > > So what's the best way of keeping the tootsies frost
    > > > free? Do I need winter shoes, over shoes or something
    > > > completely different?
    > >
    > > I just wear big thick wooly socks with plain Shimano SPD-
    > > R MTB shoes and that works for me.
    >
    > This can apparently cause reduced circulation which leads
    > to chilled/numb feet. Typically I suffer, but when I have
    > my wits about me, I try to put on my toe warmers. These
    > are little adidas? neoprene covers for the front part of
    > your shoe - reduces the wind and water getting in.. I've
    > never tried full "booties" though. They seem a bit too..
    > um... wanky ;-)
    >

    When you get up at 5:00 am to train at the thermometer says
    O degrees, then I am happy to be a wanka !!
     
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