rules of running

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Schuburg, Dec 6, 2003.

  1. Schuburg

    Schuburg Guest

    1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule
    2.- the do-not-run-within-2-hours-of-eating rule
    3.- the 1 minute slower than marathon pace rule
    4.- the once a week speedwork rule
    5.- the do-not-run-for-a-month-after-a-marathon rule
    6.- the 90% of miles are easy miles rule

    etcetera... what other rules can you think of?
     
    Tags:


  2. you'll get crabs."
     
  3. Swstudio

    Swstudio Guest

    "schuburg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > 1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule

    This rule makes little sense. If you are currently running say, 50 miles a week, then within six
    months you will be running over 200 miles a week.

    > 2.- the do-not-run-within-2-hours-of-eating rule

    I break this every day, and so does the majority of runners. If it works for you, stick with it, but
    it's not for everyone. I could personally eat a full plate of lasagne and run a 10 miler half an
    hour later.

    > 3.- the 1 minute slower than marathon pace rule

    ... meaning that this pace should be you regular training run pace, I assume? For me, that would be
    about 7:30/mile. This sounds reasonable, although again - running "rules" don't work because
    everyone is different. I personally do NO running slower than about ½ marathon pace, ever. This
    stimulus seems to work for me - although it does not for a training partner of mine.

    > 4.- the once a week speedwork rule

    ... if you are at a certain level. A beginner would get injured with this schedule, and an elite
    runner would get bored.

    > 5.- the do-not-run-for-a-month-after-a-marathon rule

    ... if you broke your leg or something running it, maybe! Who told you to not run for a month after
    a marathon? Is this a troll??

    > 6.- the 90% of miles are easy miles rule

    ... for what goal to be reached? At what point in training?

    > etcetera... what other rules can you think of?

    How about "all runners are different, and there are no hard, fast rules that can be applied to all
    of them." :)

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org
     
  4. schuburg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > 1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule
    > 2.- the do-not-run-within-2-hours-of-eating rule
    > 3.- the 1 minute slower than marathon pace rule
    > 4.- the once a week speedwork rule
    > 5.- the do-not-run-for-a-month-after-a-marathon rule
    > 6.- the 90% of miles are easy miles rule
    >
    > etcetera... what other rules can you think of?

    7) The "There's an exception to every rule" rule.
    8) The "Rules were meant to be broken" rule.

    -dave

    --
    work: dga - at - lcs.mit.edu me: angio - at - pobox.com MIT Laboratory for Computer Science
    http://www.angio.net/ (note that my reply-to address is vaguely despammed...) bulk emailers: I do
    not accept unsolicited email. Do not mail me.
     
  5. Arbor77

    Arbor77 Guest

    get crabs."

    Not really up to your usual standards, is this? Care to try again? After all, if you don't have
    anything to say, why say anything?
     
  6. M1ahearn

    M1ahearn Guest

    >> > 1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule

    This rule makes little sense. If you are currently running say, 50 miles a week, then within six
    months you will be running over 200 miles a week. <<

    Only if they make the increases mandatory.

    Mike
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, SwStudio wrote:
    > "schuburg" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    [snip]

    Good points, but I think for most runners in their first year or two of training, it would pay to
    follow most of the rules, with the exception of the retarded 2 hr rule. The marathon pace rule needs
    to be replaced with something else since most relative beginners don't have a marathon time or even
    a race time, and the "10% rule" is just crap and needs to be replaced with something a little less
    permissive (e.g. 10% every 3 weeks)

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  8. Tenkman

    Tenkman Guest

    "Dave Andersen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > schuburg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > 1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule
    > > 2.- the do-not-run-within-2-hours-of-eating rule
    > > 3.- the 1 minute slower than marathon pace rule
    > > 4.- the once a week speedwork rule
    > > 5.- the do-not-run-for-a-month-after-a-marathon rule
    > > 6.- the 90% of miles are easy miles rule
    > >
    > > etcetera... what other rules can you think of?
    >
    > 7) The "There's an exception to every rule" rule.
    > 8) The "Rules were meant to be broken" rule.
    >
    > -dave

    Rules 4,5,6 are rather bogus rules.

    >
    > --
    > work: dga - at - lcs.mit.edu me: angio - at -
    pobox.com
    > MIT Laboratory for Computer Science
    http://www.angio.net/
    > (note that my reply-to address is vaguely despammed...) bulk emailers: I do not accept
    > unsolicited email. Do not mail
    me.
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Dave Andersen wrote:
    > schuburg <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> 1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule
    >> 2.- the do-not-run-within-2-hours-of-eating rule
    >> 3.- the 1 minute slower than marathon pace rule
    >> 4.- the once a week speedwork rule
    >> 5.- the do-not-run-for-a-month-after-a-marathon rule
    >> 6.- the 90% of miles are easy miles rule
    >>
    >> etcetera... what other rules can you think of?
    >
    > 7) The "There's an exception to every rule" rule.
    > 8) The "Rules were meant to be broken" rule.

    Each "rule" is based on a principle. You can break the "rule" if you understand the principle,
    otherwise (7) and (8) don't really apply.

    Actually, all of the 6 rules are somewhat problematic.

    (1) is too permissive -- it allows very rapid milage increases.
    (2) is just plain wrong, and most people could safely ignore it.
    (3) is meaningless unless you know what your marathon pace is, and meaningless for someone whose
    marathon times are slow compared to their times for short distances.
    (4) doesn't make much sense at all -- beginners could do fine without speed work, and more
    experienced runners could do 2 speed sessions each week, or even 3, especially if the program is
    periodised
    (5) ... ? overly restrictive. Even the more conservative runners I know don't follow this "rule".
    (6) as stated, this means that you'd need 50mpw to support a 5k tempo run + 6x400m in a week. 15% is
    a more realistic guideline, but it's more of a guideline than a "rule".

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  10. Drlith

    Drlith Guest

    "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > 3.- the 1 minute slower than marathon pace rule
    >
    > ... meaning that this pace should be you regular training run pace, I assume? For me, that would
    > be about 7:30/mile. This sounds reasonable, although again - running "rules" don't work because
    > everyone is different. I personally do NO running slower than about ½ marathon pace, ever. This
    > stimulus seems to work for me - although it does not for a training partner of mine.

    Not that it really matters, but this just doesn't compute for me...

    You are saying your MP is around 6:30/mile. Presumably, your 1/2 MP is a smidgen faster (let's say,
    6:25/mile?). And you do NO training runs slower than that pace? I guess if your training runs are
    all 1/2 marathon distance or less, that might be possible. Or maybe it's the currency devaluation of
    the Canajun minute...
     
  11. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    SwStudio wrote:

    >>2.- the do-not-run-within-2-hours-of-eating rule

    This is a playful takeoff on swimming.

    > I break this every day, and so does the majority of runners. If it works for you, stick with it,
    > but it's not for everyone. I could personally eat a full plate of lasagne and run a 10 miler half
    > an hour later.

    I eat immediately before, during and after. I do pass on the beer until after the race. I can only
    hope a race would offer lasagna. I had pizza this year and it tasted fantastic.

    --
    Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]
     
  12. TomyTroll

    TomyTroll Guest

    On 06 Dec 2003 00:05:11 GMT, [email protected] (Arbor77) wrote:

    >get crabs."
    >
    >Not really up to your usual standards, is this? Care to try again? After all, if you don't have
    >anything to say, why say anything?

    It's that troll award, it went right to her head.
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>, M1ahearn wrote:
    >>> > 1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule
    >
    > This rule makes little sense. If you are currently running say, 50 miles a week, then within six
    > months you will be running over 200 miles a week. <<
    >
    > Only if they make the increases mandatory.

    It makes little sense either way, because it permits doubling milage over a 2 month period. It's too
    permissive to be a reasonable restriction, and as stated, it doesn't allow more than 10%
    week-to-week variation (so 42-38-42 is not allowed because there is a >10% increase in there)

    Some improvements/refinements to this rule include 10% increase every 3 weeks, or a 15% increase
    per month.

    But that's somewhat beside the point -- a "rule" should make sense without a lot of
    justification/reinterpretation.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>, SwStudio wrote:
    > "schuburg" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    [snip]

    Good points, but I think for most runners in their first year or two of training, it would pay to
    follow most of the rules, with the exception of the retarded 2 hr rule. The marathon pace rule needs
    to be replaced with something else since most relative beginners don't have a marathon time or even
    a race time, and the "10% rule" is just crap and needs to be replaced with something a little less
    permissive (e.g. 10% every 3 weeks)

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  15. Tenkman

    Tenkman Guest

    "Dave Andersen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > schuburg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > 1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule
    > > 2.- the do-not-run-within-2-hours-of-eating rule
    > > 3.- the 1 minute slower than marathon pace rule
    > > 4.- the once a week speedwork rule
    > > 5.- the do-not-run-for-a-month-after-a-marathon rule
    > > 6.- the 90% of miles are easy miles rule
    > >
    > > etcetera... what other rules can you think of?
    >
    > 7) The "There's an exception to every rule" rule.
    > 8) The "Rules were meant to be broken" rule.
    >
    > -dave

    Rules 4,5,6 are rather bogus rules.

    >
    > --
    > work: dga - at - lcs.mit.edu me: angio - at -
    pobox.com
    > MIT Laboratory for Computer Science
    http://www.angio.net/
    > (note that my reply-to address is vaguely despammed...) bulk emailers: I do not accept
    > unsolicited email. Do not mail
    me.
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>, Dave Andersen wrote:
    > schuburg <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> 1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule
    >> 2.- the do-not-run-within-2-hours-of-eating rule
    >> 3.- the 1 minute slower than marathon pace rule
    >> 4.- the once a week speedwork rule
    >> 5.- the do-not-run-for-a-month-after-a-marathon rule
    >> 6.- the 90% of miles are easy miles rule
    >>
    >> etcetera... what other rules can you think of?
    >
    > 7) The "There's an exception to every rule" rule.
    > 8) The "Rules were meant to be broken" rule.

    Each "rule" is based on a principle. You can break the "rule" if you understand the principle,
    otherwise (7) and (8) don't really apply.

    Actually, all of the 6 rules are somewhat problematic.

    (1) is too permissive -- it allows very rapid milage increases.
    (2) is just plain wrong, and most people could safely ignore it.
    (3) is meaningless unless you know what your marathon pace is, and meaningless for someone whose
    marathon times are slow compared to their times for short distances.
    (4) doesn't make much sense at all -- beginners could do fine without speed work, and more
    experienced runners could do 2 speed sessions each week, or even 3, especially if the program is
    periodised
    (5) ... ? overly restrictive. Even the more conservative runners I know don't follow this "rule".
    (6) as stated, this means that you'd need 50mpw to support a 5k tempo run + 6x400m in a week. 15% is
    a more realistic guideline, but it's more of a guideline than a "rule".

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  17. Drlith

    Drlith Guest

    "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > 3.- the 1 minute slower than marathon pace rule
    >
    > ... meaning that this pace should be you regular training run pace, I assume? For me, that would
    > be about 7:30/mile. This sounds reasonable, although again - running "rules" don't work because
    > everyone is different. I personally do NO running slower than about ½ marathon pace, ever. This
    > stimulus seems to work for me - although it does not for a training partner of mine.

    Not that it really matters, but this just doesn't compute for me...

    You are saying your MP is around 6:30/mile. Presumably, your 1/2 MP is a smidgen faster (let's say,
    6:25/mile?). And you do NO training runs slower than that pace? I guess if your training runs are
    all 1/2 marathon distance or less, that might be possible. Or maybe it's the currency devaluation of
    the Canajun minute...
     
  18. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    SwStudio wrote:

    >>2.- the do-not-run-within-2-hours-of-eating rule

    This is a playful takeoff on swimming.

    > I break this every day, and so does the majority of runners. If it works for you, stick with it,
    > but it's not for everyone. I could personally eat a full plate of lasagne and run a 10 miler half
    > an hour later.

    I eat immediately before, during and after. I do pass on the beer until after the race. I can only
    hope a race would offer lasagna. I had pizza this year and it tasted fantastic.

    --
    Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]
     
  19. Topcounsel

    Topcounsel Guest

    >>> > 1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule
    >
    >This rule makes little sense. If you are currently running say, 50 miles a week, then within six
    >months you will be running over 200 miles a week. <<
    >
    > Only if they make the increases mandatory.

    Yeah, this "Rule" is usually stated to the effect that you should not increase your weekly mileage
    by more than 10%. It is not a "rule" that says you should increase your mileage every week by 10%!

    As has been noted by others, a great deal of variability between runners on this is found (I include
    myself, as I have found I can vary my mileage considerably without too much ill effect). This "rule"
    may be meant mostly for those relatively new to the sport...
     
  20. In article <20031205203445.15365.000[email protected]>, TopCounsel wrote:
    >>>> > 1.- the 10% per week mileage increase rule
    >>
    >>This rule makes little sense. If you are currently running say, 50 miles a week, then within six
    >>months you will be running over 200 miles a week. <<
    >>
    >> Only if they make the increases mandatory.
    >
    > Yeah, this "Rule" is usually stated to the effect that you should not increase your weekly mileage
    > by more than 10%. It is not a "rule" that says you should increase your mileage every week by 10%!

    It's a rule that misses the point, because long term trends need to be tempered more than
    week-to-week variation. So a sensible rule should be sufficiently restrictive to constrain growth to
    a sensible level, maybe about 15% per month or 10% per 3 weeks.

    > As has been noted by others, a great deal of variability between runners on this is found (I
    > include myself, as I have found I can vary my mileage considerably without too much ill effect).
    > This "rule" may be meant mostly for those relatively new to the sport...

    I think it actually applies to milage buildups in general, especially when you're hitting milage new
    levels. For example, someone who has been running 40mpw for a year looking to increase to 60mpw
    would still be well-advised to use a careful buildup and not suddenly jump into 60mpw.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
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