Rules on the track



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Keven Ruf

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What are the rules governing equipment eligible for use on the track? I looked at the usacycling.org
site under track rules, but the only reference to equipment was something about green disks and
sponges. I am intereted in learning what kind of bikes are legal and what are not-- for example, are
there rules governing fork ends versus horizontal drop outs?

--keven.
 
C

Casey Kerrigan

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Keven Ruf <[email protected]> wrote:

> What are the rules governing equipment eligible for use on the track? I looked at the
> usacycling.org site under track rules, but the only reference to equipment was something about
> green disks and sponges. I am intereted in learning what kind of bikes are legal and what are
> not-- for example, are there rules governing fork ends versus horizontal drop outs?
>
> --keven.
Go to the USAC Web site. In the right column you will find the 2002 USCF rulebook link. Follow the
link You want Section 1 General racing rules. Down load that link and fnd rule 1J Bicycles. Read
over the general rules and also the track specific rules for bicycles and you will know all the
restrictions on bicycles for track as well as road.

Casey
 
M

Mike Murray

Guest
There are also separate rules for other organizations. They are similar but distinct.

UCI: http://www.uci.ch./english/about/rules.htm OBRA: http://www.obra.org/pdfs/obra%20rules.pdf ACA:
http://www.americancycling.org/info/documents/rulebook.pdf ABR:
http://www.ambikerace.com/ftp/rulebook-2003.pdf

FIAC is in the process of adopting a unified set of rules which will soon be posted at:
http://www.fiac.us

This should cover track racing in the US. I am sure that there are other rules covering track racing
in other countries.

I don't believe that any of the rules covering events in the US make any stipulation regarding the
configuration of fork ends beyond basic safety statements. Both rear facing track fork ends and
forward facing drop outs should be allowed.

--
Mike Murray

"Casey Kerrigan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:190220031637513566%[email protected]...
> In article <[email protected]>, Keven Ruf <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > What are the rules governing equipment eligible for use on the track? I looked at the
> > usacycling.org site under track rules, but the only reference to equipment was something about
> > green disks and sponges. I am intereted in learning what kind of bikes are legal and what are
> > not-- for example, are there rules governing fork ends versus horizontal drop outs?
> >
> > --keven.
> Go to the USAC Web site. In the right column you will find the 2002 USCF rulebook link. Follow the
> link You want Section 1 General racing rules. Down load that link and fnd rule 1J Bicycles. Read
> over the general rules and also the track specific rules for bicycles and you will know all the
> restrictions on bicycles for track as well as road.
>
> Casey
 
K

Keven Ruf

Guest
Thanks both Mike and Casey.

In my quick review it seems only the USAC rules disallow the use of quick release wheels in some
track events, while the other ruling bodies do not specifically mention how the wheel is fastened to
the frame. None even mention track fork ends and the only thing preventing someone from racing on
the track with horizontal dropouts is fear of being laughed out of the infield.

--keven.
 
M

Mike S.

Guest
"Keven Ruf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Thanks both Mike and Casey.
>
> In my quick review it seems only the USAC rules disallow the use of quick release wheels in some
> track events, while the other ruling bodies do not specifically mention how the wheel is fastened
> to the frame. None even mention track fork ends and the only thing preventing someone from racing
> on the track with horizontal dropouts is fear of being laughed out of the infield.
>
> --keven.

If you're talking rear horizontal dropouts, everyone has them. I didn't think that there was such a
thing as a front horizontal dropout. You can't adjust chain tension for different gear ratios
without some way to move the rear wheel around front to back.

I've noticed that as long as you're taping the QR to the fork blades with some kind of tape, the
officials will let you race. Best bet for using road wheels on the track is a set of steel bolt-on
skewers. These are cheap, effective, and you won't run afoul of the refs. I have several road front
wheels that I use on the track, I just switch the skewer around and away I go.

As a note: some officials/tracks insist that you run a lockring. I don't normally, but I always have
one around. Just in case.

Mike
 
K

Keven Ruf

Guest
"Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> If you're talking rear horizontal dropouts, everyone has them. I didn't think that there was such
> a thing as a front horizontal dropout. You can't adjust chain tension for different gear ratios
> without some way to move the rear wheel around front to back.
>
> I've noticed that as long as you're taping the QR to the fork blades with some kind of tape, the
> officials will let you race. Best bet for using road wheels on the track is a set of steel bolt-on
> skewers. These are cheap, effective, and you won't run afoul of the refs. I have several road
> front wheels that I use on the track, I just switch the skewer around and away I go.
>
> As a note: some officials/tracks insist that you run a lockring. I don't normally, but I always
> have one around. Just in case.
>
> Mike

That's a great idea, using knutted quick releases. Thanks. And by the way, I mean horizontal rear
dropouts, versus rear-facing track fork ends. Fork ends aren't (technically) "drop-outs." I finally
put a lock ring on my fixed gear, mainly because it was sitting there on the work bench and I still
had half a beer worth of bike work left to be done in the garage.

--Keven.
 
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