Runner dies in 1/2 marathon

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by TenKMan, Mar 16, 2005.

  1. TenKMan

    TenKMan Guest

    My family and I ran this race Saturday in Moab, UT. What a gorgeous race
    along the Colorado river with finishing temperatures around 70 degrees. I
    did see the ambulance leave twice at the finish line and apparently this was
    the first death in the 30 year history of the race. A 41 year-old mother of
    three who had run a lot of races before. Bummer.


    http://www.sltrib.com/search/ci_2608353
     
    Tags:


  2. Old peeps deserve to die. Life is for the living.
     
  3. Tim & Tina

    Tim & Tina Guest

    Usually runners that die in races, which are mainly due to heart attacks,
    are found to have had some history of problems. If not, than they either
    over-exerted themselves, or in other words didn't listen to their body's
    warning signs, and also may not have adequately trained for the race.
    Knowing your limits, listening to your body, and preparation are key
    elements to running.


    "TenKMan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > My family and I ran this race Saturday in Moab, UT. What a gorgeous race
    > along the Colorado river with finishing temperatures around 70 degrees. I
    > did see the ambulance leave twice at the finish line and apparently this
    > was
    > the first death in the 30 year history of the race. A 41 year-old mother
    > of
    > three who had run a lot of races before. Bummer.
    >
    >
    > http://www.sltrib.com/search/ci_2608353
    >
    >
     
  4. "Old peeps
    Deserve to die.
    Life is for the living."
    ~ The

    "But, O, the dead keep giving,
    Don't you know? My eye's
    Crying ~ Those DeadE Boyz still haunt my sleep,
    My waking,
    My Ilk of Too, too."
    ~ Twittering
     
  5. Tim Downie

    Tim Downie Guest

    Tim & Tina wrote:
    > Usually runners that die in races, which are mainly due to heart
    > attacks, are found to have had some history of problems. If not,
    > than they either over-exerted themselves, or in other words didn't
    > listen to their body's warning signs, and also may not have
    > adequately trained for the race. Knowing your limits, listening to
    > your body, and preparation are key elements to running.


    It's a comforting thought but not always true alas. HOCM (hypertrophic
    obstructive cardiomyopathy) may be silent until the day it kills you.
    Likewise with some cardiac conduction defects.

    Tim
     
  6. Tim Downie wrote:
    > Tim & Tina wrote:
    >
    >>Usually runners that die in races, which are mainly due to heart
    >>attacks, are found to have had some history of problems. If not,
    >>than they either over-exerted themselves, or in other words didn't
    >>listen to their body's warning signs, and also may not have
    >>adequately trained for the race. Knowing your limits, listening to
    >>your body, and preparation are key elements to running.

    >
    >
    > It's a comforting thought but not always true alas. HOCM (hypertrophic
    > obstructive cardiomyopathy) may be silent until the day it kills you.
    > Likewise with some cardiac conduction defects.


    of course we could get hit by a bus next time out.

    >
    > Tim
    >
    >
     
  7. On 2005-03-16, Tim & Tina <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Usually runners that die in races, which are mainly due to heart attacks,
    > are found to have had some history of problems. If not, than they either
    > over-exerted themselves, or in other words didn't listen to their body's
    > warning signs, and also may not have adequately trained for the race.
    > Knowing your limits, listening to your body, and preparation are key
    > elements to running.
    >
    >
    > "TenKMan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> My family and I ran this race Saturday in Moab, UT. What a gorgeous race
    >> along the Colorado river with finishing temperatures around 70 degrees. I
    >> did see the ambulance leave twice at the finish line and apparently this
    >> was
    >> the first death in the 30 year history of the race. A 41 year-old mother
    >> of
    >> three who had run a lot of races before. Bummer.
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www.sltrib.com/search/ci_2608353
    >>
    >>

    >
    >



    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  8. On 2005-03-16, Tim Downie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Tim & Tina wrote:
    >> Usually runners that die in races, which are mainly due to heart
    >> attacks, are found to have had some history of problems. If not,
    >> than they either over-exerted themselves, or in other words didn't
    >> listen to their body's warning signs, and also may not have
    >> adequately trained for the race. Knowing your limits, listening to
    >> your body, and preparation are key elements to running.

    >
    > It's a comforting thought but not always true alas. HOCM (hypertrophic
    > obstructive cardiomyopathy) may be silent until the day it kills you.
    > Likewise with some cardiac conduction defects.


    More comforting is the fact that these deaths are actually quite rare.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  9. On 2005-03-16, Tim & Tina <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Usually runners that die in races, which are mainly due to heart attacks,
    > are found to have had some history of problems. If not, than they either
    > over-exerted themselves, or in other words didn't listen to their body's
    > warning signs, and also may not have adequately trained for the race.
    > Knowing your limits, listening to your body, and preparation are key
    > elements to running.


    Bullshit. "Over-exerting" yourself -- overriding shutdown mechanisms is
    critical to good performance. All good athlets "over-exert" themselves.

    As for listening to "listening to your body" .... well, most of these people
    who have heart attacks collapse *after* they cross the line.

    While it might be comforting to tell yourself that you'll be OK "as long as
    you listen to your body", it's not really true. Training properly might help,
    but if you're one of those 1 in 40,000-100,000 runners who has an undiagnosed
    heart problem (and not necessarily a documented "history"), it's not going
    to help you a whole lot.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  10. Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
    > On 2005-03-16, Tim & Tina <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Usually runners that die in races, which are mainly due to heart attacks,
    >>are found to have had some history of problems. If not, than they either
    >>over-exerted themselves, or in other words didn't listen to their body's
    >>warning signs, and also may not have adequately trained for the race.
    >>Knowing your limits, listening to your body, and preparation are key
    >>elements to running.

    >
    >
    > Bullshit. "Over-exerting" yourself -- overriding shutdown mechanisms is
    > critical to good performance. All good athlets "over-exert" themselves.


    to this point there's a great quote in "Advanced Marathoning",

    "We get sick of reading in U.S. publications about the importance of
    rest and never about hard you have to train to be successful!"

    >
    > As for listening to "listening to your body" .... well, most of these people
    > who have heart attacks collapse *after* they cross the line.
    >
    > While it might be comforting to tell yourself that you'll be OK "as long as
    > you listen to your body", it's not really true. Training properly might help,
    > but if you're one of those 1 in 40,000-100,000 runners who has an undiagnosed
    > heart problem (and not necessarily a documented "history"), it's not going
    > to help you a whole lot.
    >
    > Cheers,
     
  11. Bumper

    Bumper Guest

    Having participated in well over 2,000 resuscitations I can offer these
    two points to ponder:

    1. The Lord gets ya when the Lord wants ya, not a minute sooner or
    later. I participated in many where there was no plausible reason for
    the heart to have stopped, and others where there was no plausible
    reason for it to have restarted.

    2. How many non-runners died in the surrounding area within 24 hours of
    this incident. Me I rather go doing something I enjoy rather than
    watching the world go by.


    Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2005-03-16, Tim Downie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Tim & Tina wrote:
    > >> Usually runners that die in races, which are mainly due to heart
    > >> attacks, are found to have had some history of problems. If not,
    > >> than they either over-exerted themselves, or in other words didn't
    > >> listen to their body's warning signs, and also may not have
    > >> adequately trained for the race. Knowing your limits, listening to
    > >> your body, and preparation are key elements to running.

    > >
    > > It's a comforting thought but not always true alas. HOCM (hypertrophic
    > > obstructive cardiomyopathy) may be silent until the day it kills you.
    > > Likewise with some cardiac conduction defects.

    >
    > More comforting is the fact that these deaths are actually quite rare.
    >
    > Cheers,
     
  12. Bumper wrote:
    > Having participated in well over 2,000 resuscitations I can offer these
    > two points to ponder:


    Who are you? Death?

    >
    > 1. The Lord gets ya when the Lord wants ya, not a minute sooner or
    > later. I participated in many where there was no plausible reason for
    > the heart to have stopped, and others where there was no plausible
    > reason for it to have restarted.


    i'm sure the lord is too busy talking to Babe Ruth and Thurman Munson to
    know what we're up to.

    >
    > 2. How many non-runners died in the surrounding area within 24 hours of
    > this incident. Me I rather go doing something I enjoy rather than
    > watching the world go by.


    I'm dropping dead on my honeymoon with my 23 year old wife when i'm 100.


    >
    >
    > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>On 2005-03-16, Tim Downie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Tim & Tina wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Usually runners that die in races, which are mainly due to heart
    >>>>attacks, are found to have had some history of problems. If not,
    >>>>than they either over-exerted themselves, or in other words didn't
    >>>>listen to their body's warning signs, and also may not have
    >>>>adequately trained for the race. Knowing your limits, listening to
    >>>>your body, and preparation are key elements to running.
    >>>
    >>>It's a comforting thought but not always true alas. HOCM (hypertrophic
    >>>obstructive cardiomyopathy) may be silent until the day it kills you.
    >>>Likewise with some cardiac conduction defects.

    >>
    >>More comforting is the fact that these deaths are actually quite rare.
    >>
    >>Cheers,
     
  13. rick++

    rick++ Guest

    Thats probably the way I'd like to die,
    but not until age 90 or so (too bad TBR-clones!).
    Its a quick death with little pain.
    I was an outdoors in a beautiful area.
    And I'd like to be healthy enough to run
    until my last moments.
     
  14. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Leafing through rec.running, I read a message from
    [email protected] of 16 Mar 2005:

    > Having participated in well over 2,000 resuscitations I can offer
    > these two points to ponder:
    >
    > 1. The Lord gets ya when the Lord wants ya, not a minute sooner or
    > later. I participated in many where there was no plausible reason for
    > the heart to have stopped, and others where there was no plausible
    > reason for it to have restarted.


    Exactly! Although, since I'm not what you would call religous, I would say
    "when your number's up, your number's up." And whenever I get on a flight I
    always hope that the pilot's number isn't up anytime soon. ;-)

    Phil M.

    --
    "What counts in battle is what you do once the pain sets in." -John Short,
    South African coach.
     
  15. Tony

    Tony Guest

    rick++ wrote in message
    <[email protected]>...
    >Thats probably the way I'd like to die,
    >but not until age 90 or so (too bad TBR-clones!).
    >Its a quick death with little pain.
    >I was an outdoors in a beautiful area.
    >And I'd like to be healthy enough to run
    >until my last moments.


    Accomplished, lived already, witnessing the slow inexorable slippage of
    society into a chaos that dependence on global trade once interrupted can't
    cope with. Then finding yourself over-exerted in the throws of a blizzard
    at -40f doing the iditerod on snowshoes, drink your last beer and settle
    into a snowbank. As your heat goes faster, feeling a warm flush come over
    you so much so that you feel like removing your clothes. No pain. The heat
    slips away from your body.

    The old ones used to slip away in a similar way, knowing when it's time. The
    indignity of a sterile death, held on to too long, sealing up the body with
    chemicals, dumping it into a sealed container and then polluting the earth
    with such, not even allowing it to recycle; it's so wrong.

    -Tony
     
  16. >Accomplished, lived already, witnessing the slow inexorable slippage
    of
    society into a chaos that dependence on global trade once interrupted
    can't
    cope with. Then finding yourself over-exerted in the throws of a
    blizzard
    at -40f doing the iditerod on snowshoes, drink your last beer and
    settle
    into a snowbank. As your heat goes faster, feeling a warm flush come
    over
    you so much so that you feel like removing your clothes. No pain. The
    heat
    slips away from your body. >

    Fukin' hey! That sounds so good, I'm going outside, strip naked, and
    smoke a fatty while I'm in a snowbank.
     
  17. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

    "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-03-16, Tim & Tina <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Usually runners that die in races, which are mainly due to heart attacks,
    >> are found to have had some history of problems. If not, than they either
    >> over-exerted themselves, or in other words didn't listen to their body's
    >> warning signs, and also may not have adequately trained for the race.
    >> Knowing your limits, listening to your body, and preparation are key
    >> elements to running.

    >
    > Bullshit. "Over-exerting" yourself -- overriding shutdown mechanisms is
    > critical to good performance. All good athlets "over-exert" themselves.
    >
    > As for listening to "listening to your body" .... well, most of these
    > people
    > who have heart attacks collapse *after* they cross the line.
    >
    > While it might be comforting to tell yourself that you'll be OK "as long
    > as
    > you listen to your body", it's not really true. Training properly might
    > help,
    > but if you're one of those 1 in 40,000-100,000 runners who has an
    > undiagnosed
    > heart problem (and not necessarily a documented "history"), it's not going
    > to help you a whole lot.


    Our running club mandates yearly ergometric stress tests including
    examination by a doctor.
    One of our club members discovered a heart-valve problem.
    Having the test could well have saved his life.

    Anthony.
     
  18. Tim Downie

    Tim Downie Guest

    rick++ wrote:
    > Thats probably the way I'd like to die,
    > but not until age 90 or so (too bad TBR-clones!).
    > Its a quick death with little pain.
    > I was an outdoors in a beautiful area.
    > And I'd like to be healthy enough to run
    > until my last moments.


    As my father is currently fading away with an enormous amount of indignity
    (senile dementia), I couldn't agree more at this moment.

    Tim

    ps. Rick, you couldn't learn to reply with attributions and quotes too
    could you? It's a courtesy to other usenet users who may not see the origin
    of a thread. Instead of hitting "reply" in the new groups google interface,
    hit "show options" then "reply". That way you get the correct attributions
    *and* quoted text that you can edit.
     
  19. anders

    anders Guest

    Donovan Rebbechi wrote:

    > Bullshit. "Over-exerting" yourself -- overriding shutdown mechanisms

    is
    > critical to good performance. All good athlets "over-exert"

    themselves.

    Perhaps the advice should be limited to "Don´t over-exert yourself
    when you aren´t over-extending yourself", i.e. if your shutdown
    mechanisms begin to work at a lower intensity or sooner than they
    should, you should think twice before overriding them - especially if
    you´ve been down with a flu, if you´re a beginner or if you´re a
    veteran.

    Unless you are a good athlete (with all that it entails), you
    shouldn´t overestimate your ability to judge when shutdown mechanisms
    can be safely overriden.


    > As for listening to "listening to your body" .... well, most of these

    people
    > who have heart attacks collapse *after* they cross the line.


    This is interesting, because the deaths in XC skiing marathons in
    Scandinavia have occurred mid-race (often, but far from always after an
    uphill - and AFAIK never after the finish). The fatal incidents are so
    rare that this could be a completely random occurrence.

    BTW the deaths *seem* to have a funny habit of bunching up or coming in
    pairs between several years of no deaths: Birkebeinerrennet had two in
    1997 (IIRC), Finlandiahiihto two in 2003, and Vasaloppet two this year.


    > While it might be comforting to tell yourself that you'll be OK "as

    long as
    > you listen to your body", it's not really true. Training properly

    might help,
    > but if you're one of those 1 in 40,000-100,000 runners who has an

    undiagnosed
    > heart problem (and not necessarily a documented "history"), it's not

    going
    > to help you a whole lot.


    Yes, it helps to know not to train hard or race when you haven´t
    properly recovered from a flu, it helps to pay attention to any
    unexplained nauseous feeling or any remotely painlike sensation in your
    chest, stomach or arms during exercise, but, as you said, there are
    heart conditions whose first symptom may appear in a race.


    Anders
     
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