Running and pull-ups?



B

Burak Ilter

Guest
Hi,
I recently discovered a distance marked running course close to my
house. There are also some bars to make pull-ups.

I wonder if I can mix pull-ups and running in some form. When I go to
the course for easier runs (certainly not when I do intervals) can I do
pull-ups and would it be useful? Running uses mainly torso and legs, and
pull-ups uses lats and shoulders. So I think they will not effect each
other. Am I correct?
--
Burak
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T

thinnmann

Guest
Burak,
Your workouts should be goal oriented. What is the point of doing the
pull-ups? They shouldn't affect each other, true, but doing them
probably will not make you a better runner, swimmer, or cyclist....
Are there any bike-run-pull-up tris out there that I haven't heard
about?
 
B

Burak Ilter

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] says...
> Burak,
> Your workouts should be goal oriented. What is the point of doing the
> pull-ups? They shouldn't affect each other, true, but doing them
> probably will not make you a better runner, swimmer, or cyclist....
> Are there any bike-run-pull-up tris out there that I haven't heard
> about?
>
>

From what I read, I think that pull-ups are useful for swimming since
lats are heavily used in swimming.

Any comments?
--
Burak
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D

DaveB

Guest
Burak Ilter wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> [email protected] says...
>
>>Burak,
>>Your workouts should be goal oriented. What is the point of doing the
>>pull-ups? They shouldn't affect each other, true, but doing them
>>probably will not make you a better runner, swimmer, or cyclist....
>>Are there any bike-run-pull-up tris out there that I haven't heard
>>about?
>>
>>

>
> From what I read, I think that pull-ups are useful for swimming since
> lats are heavily used in swimming.
>
> Any comments?


Yes lats and triceps are heavily used in swimming, but we're talking
endurance activities. How many strokes would you take for 1500m?
Personally I would take around 1500 but I've got a fairly inefficient
stroke. Now how many pull-ups can you do - 10, 20? It would be like
training for a 10km run by doing 10 or 20 squats with a decent weight.
Same muscles but totally different aim.

DaveB
 
B

Burak Ilter

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] says...
> Yes lats and triceps are heavily used in swimming, but we're talking
> endurance activities. How many strokes would you take for 1500m?
> Personally I would take around 1500 but I've got a fairly inefficient
> stroke. Now how many pull-ups can you do - 10, 20? It would be like
> training for a 10km run by doing 10 or 20 squats with a decent weight.
> Same muscles but totally different aim.
>
> DaveB
>
>

Yes, of course I can do far few pull-ups than my 1500m stroke count. But
isn't the concept same with other strength trainings? As far as you can
do 20-30 times per set (or more), you are training the muscles for
endurance work, right?. I certainly cannot do 20 pull-ups, but I have no
other way to strength train the same muscle group (meaning I am not
going to any gyms). Do you do any strength training? Do you have any
suggestions?

If anyone can offer an easier method that I can apply at home, I
certainly will prefer that.
--
Burak
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T

thinnmann

Guest
Ah Burak, now I can infer from your post that there is, in fact, a goal
in doing the pull-ups; that was not evident previously.
If your goal is strength training, the pull-ups will help, but they
will detract from your running workout.
As for muscles used in swimming, Dave B had a great points. And
consider that pull-ups mostly use your bicep. Your bicep does not do
much for your swimming stroke during front crawl. (Nor does it do much
for any sport except a few like wrestling where you have to use
powerful movements into your body, because most power movements in
sports move away from the body.) In swimming, the most powerful part
of the front crawl is the push "down" from the hip to full extension,
clearly from triceps contraction. The bicep is operating from the
catch at full arm extension "above" your head to about when your hand
is even with the shoulder, and is doing relatively little work against
the water at that point in time.