runny maple syrup?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Karen AKA Kajikit, Mar 1, 2005.

  1. I bought a bottle of 'real' maple syrup in the supermarket. It wasn't
    the cheapest and it wasn't the most expensive... but it was very runny
    and thin tasting, and very disappointing. The bottle's almost gone, so
    I want something nicer for the next one... any suggestions for maple
    syrup brands in Florida?

    On another note - last year I was struggling to make pancakes and
    failing dismally. Since I moved to Florida it's easy! I make them
    every sunday morning for our breakfast, because it's far cheaper than
    going out and buying them... so what's the secret? In Australia I was
    using a gas stove and I couldn't get the temperature right. The stove
    in the apartment here is electric! I never realised there could be so
    much difference between them...
    ~Karen aka Kajikit
    Lover of fine chocolate, fun crafts, and furry felines
    http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    *remove 'nospam' to reply
     
    Tags:


  2. aem

    aem Guest

    Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:
    > I bought a bottle of 'real' maple syrup in the supermarket. It wasn't
    > the cheapest and it wasn't the most expensive... but it was very
    > runny and thin tasting, and very disappointing. [snip]


    Don't know about brands, but I recommend you look for two things when
    shopping for maple syrup. It should say "100% Pure," and it should say
    "U.S. Grade B." The grading system has to do with color, and "A" is
    lighter than "B." It's a matter of personal taste, of course, but we
    think Grade B has a richer taste.

    > On another note - last year I was struggling to make pancakes [snip]
    > In Australia I was using a gas stove and I couldn't get the
    > temperature right. The stove in the apartment here is electric!

    [snip]

    We have a gas stove, and I use the electric skillet for pancakes.
    350°F works best on this particular one.

    -aem
     
  3. On 1 Mar 2005 10:52:41 -0800, "aem" <aem_again@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:
    >> I bought a bottle of 'real' maple syrup in the supermarket. It wasn't
    >> the cheapest and it wasn't the most expensive... but it was very
    >> runny and thin tasting, and very disappointing. [snip]

    >
    >Don't know about brands, but I recommend you look for two things when
    >shopping for maple syrup. It should say "100% Pure," and it should say
    >"U.S. Grade B." The grading system has to do with color, and "A" is
    >lighter than "B." It's a matter of personal taste, of course, but we
    >think Grade B has a richer taste.


    Ah... I thought 'a grade' meant it must be the best... this bottle was
    from 'Maple Farms' and it says it's 100% pure A grade dark amber
    syrup. Like I said, it doesn't taste very maply to me...
    ~Karen aka Kajikit
    Crafts, cats, and chocolate - the three essentials of life
    http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    *remove 'nospam' to reply
     
  4. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 14:02:09 -0500, Karen AKA Kajikit
    <kanospamjikit@gmail.com> wrote:

    >On 1 Mar 2005 10:52:41 -0800, "aem" <aem_again@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:
    >>> I bought a bottle of 'real' maple syrup in the supermarket. It wasn't
    >>> the cheapest and it wasn't the most expensive... but it was very
    >>> runny and thin tasting, and very disappointing. [snip]

    >>
    >>Don't know about brands, but I recommend you look for two things when
    >>shopping for maple syrup. It should say "100% Pure," and it should say
    >>"U.S. Grade B." The grading system has to do with color, and "A" is
    >>lighter than "B." It's a matter of personal taste, of course, but we
    >>think Grade B has a richer taste.

    >
    >Ah... I thought 'a grade' meant it must be the best... this bottle was
    >from 'Maple Farms' and it says it's 100% pure A grade dark amber
    >syrup. Like I said, it doesn't taste very maply to me...


    Think of Grade A as bleached, white flour and Grade B as whole wheat
    (without the health aspect). Some people enjoy the lighter, refined
    taste of A for pancakes, others prefer the robust B. Usually B is
    used for flavoring in cooking.

    Real maple syrup is thinner than the corn syrup based mapleoids.

    I likes my 10W grade A on my pancakes. I can't stand thick gooey 40W
    syrups.

    BTW, your success in pancakes now is not due to gas vs. electric.
    There might be something else about the stoves but I daresay one could
    make good pancakes on a wood-fired stove. A good griddle helps. I
    do mine just fine on a gas stove.

    There might have been something amiss about your old stove in
    Australia. Being upside down couldn't have helped ;>

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  5. Jim Lahue

    Jim Lahue Guest

    Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:
    > On 1 Mar 2005 10:52:41 -0800, "aem" <aem_again@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:
    >>
    >>>I bought a bottle of 'real' maple syrup in the supermarket. It wasn't
    >>>the cheapest and it wasn't the most expensive... but it was very
    >>>runny and thin tasting, and very disappointing. [snip]

    >>
    >>Don't know about brands, but I recommend you look for two things when
    >>shopping for maple syrup. It should say "100% Pure," and it should say
    >>"U.S. Grade B." The grading system has to do with color, and "A" is
    >>lighter than "B." It's a matter of personal taste, of course, but we
    >>think Grade B has a richer taste.

    >
    >
    > Ah... I thought 'a grade' meant it must be the best... this bottle was
    > from 'Maple Farms' and it says it's 100% pure A grade dark amber
    > syrup. Like I said, it doesn't taste very maply to me...
    > ~Karen aka Kajikit
    > Crafts, cats, and chocolate - the three essentials of life
    > http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    > *remove 'nospam' to reply


    The grading has no bearing on the best or worst maple syrup. Here's a
    URL that gives some explanation of grading:

    http://www.vermontmaple.org/mgrade.htm

    I, too, prefer grade B (...that's what I grew up with: both my parents
    came from Vermont...). I now live in central Texas and I buy my maple
    syrup by the ounce through stores that sell it in bulk (such as Whole
    Foods or Central Market). Much of the maple syrup in glass containers
    in the stores is watery junk. I don't know how easy it will be for you
    to find grade B syrup in a regular store.

    Jim Lahue
     
  6. Jessica V.

    Jessica V. Guest

    Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:

    > I bought a bottle of 'real' maple syrup in the supermarket. It wasn't
    > the cheapest and it wasn't the most expensive... but it was very runny
    > and thin tasting, and very disappointing. The bottle's almost gone, so
    > I want something nicer for the next one... any suggestions for maple
    > syrup brands in Florida?
    >
    > On another note - last year I was struggling to make pancakes and
    > failing dismally. Since I moved to Florida it's easy! I make them
    > every sunday morning for our breakfast, because it's far cheaper than
    > going out and buying them... so what's the secret? In Australia I was
    > using a gas stove and I couldn't get the temperature right. The stove
    > in the apartment here is electric! I never realised there could be so
    > much difference between them...
    > ~Karen aka Kajikit
    > Lover of fine chocolate, fun crafts, and furry felines
    > http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    > *remove 'nospam' to reply


    I like grade A medium amber for pancakes, grade B dark amber for dessert
    toppings and recipe flavorings. I can't help with a brand, all the
    syrup that I buy is from my great uncle who taps his trees and boils the
    sap down in the maple shack. It's been blue ribbon syrup at the county
    fair for at least 20 years running. Well, except for the year that he
    and his daughter both entered with syrup from the same batch and she
    won. LOL

    I had some Bonney Farms syrup a few years ago, it looked good in the
    bottle but was almost water in consistency. Here there is also store
    brand real maple syrup available, I've had it, it isn't bad at all. I'd
    just try until I found one I liked and hope that the next years run was
    as good.

    Jessica
     
  7. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:

    > I bought a bottle of 'real' maple syrup in the supermarket. It wasn't
    > the cheapest and it wasn't the most expensive... but it was very runny
    > and thin tasting, and very disappointing. The bottle's almost gone, so
    > I want something nicer for the next one... any suggestions for maple
    > syrup brands in Florida?


    Real maple syrup is usually a little runnier than the artificial stuff. It
    is *supposed* to be processed to a certain brix, and that sugar content
    should translate pretty closely to a consistent viscosity. I don't know
    about the brands that you buy there but here in southern Ontario where
    there are lots of maple "farms", there are standards as to brix and
    colour. Early, mid and late season syrup vary in colour, the later sap
    producing a darker syrup with more oomph to it. From my experience, the
    price variation has more to do with marketing. Some suppliers put it in
    fancy bottles, slap a fancy label on it and you can charge a few dollars
    more. Sell it in small quantities and the cost per unit soars. I buy it in
    a plain Jane litre bottle, usually around $15 per litre.


    > On another note - last year I was struggling to make pancakes and
    > failing dismally. Since I moved to Florida it's easy! I make them
    > every sunday morning for our breakfast, because it's far cheaper than
    > going out and buying them... so what's the secret? In Australia I was
    > using a gas stove and I couldn't get the temperature right. The stove
    > in the apartment here is electric! I never realised there could be so
    > much difference between them...


    There are very few rules to pancakes. The ingredients can vary a lot, but
    you can beat the batter too much and the temperature has to be right.
     
  8. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    aem wrote:r two things when

    > shopping for maple syrup. It should say "100% Pure," and it should say
    > "U.S. Grade B." The grading system has to do with color, and "A" is
    > lighter than "B." It's a matter of personal taste, of course, but we
    > think Grade B has a richer taste.
    >


    The stuff I buy must be C. It is the late harvest, much darker and deeper
    taste.
     
  9. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Dave Smith" <adavid.smith@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    news:4224DD28.168CB8DB@sympatico.ca...
    > aem wrote:r two things when
    >
    >> shopping for maple syrup. It should say "100% Pure," and it should say
    >> "U.S. Grade B." The grading system has to do with color, and "A" is
    >> lighter than "B." It's a matter of personal taste, of course, but we
    >> think Grade B has a richer taste.
    >>

    >
    > The stuff I buy must be C. It is the late harvest, much darker and deeper
    > taste.


    I tried to buy the grade B once, online ... holy crap, was it expensive. I
    can live with the usual grade A for that amount of money. I *think* I'm
    going to New Hampshire this May, maybe I can find some B for a
    reasonable price.

    nancy
     
  10. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest


    >
    > I, too, prefer grade B (...that's what I grew up with: both my parents
    > came from Vermont...). I now live in central Texas and I buy my maple
    > syrup by the ounce through stores that sell it in bulk (such as Whole
    > Foods or Central Market). Much of the maple syrup in glass containers
    > in the stores is watery junk. I don't know how easy it will be for you
    > to find grade B syrup in a regular store.
    >
    > Jim Lahue


    Actually, I found some grade B at Fred Meyers here locally & it was nice
    thick stuff. It was in a plastic "jug" style container. Can't remember
    the brand. The A grade tuff I bought at costco was watery. I didn't
    like it as much.
     
  11. "Karen AKA Kajikit" <kanospamjikit@gmail.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:qve921hkqpu4javqbbc2osqm3cjf7gk3rc@4ax.com...
    > On 1 Mar 2005 10:52:41 -0800, "aem" <aem_again@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:
    > >> I bought a bottle of 'real' maple syrup in the supermarket. It wasn't
    > >> the cheapest and it wasn't the most expensive... but it was very
    > >> runny and thin tasting, and very disappointing. [snip]

    > >
    > >Don't know about brands, but I recommend you look for two things when
    > >shopping for maple syrup. It should say "100% Pure," and it should say
    > >"U.S. Grade B." The grading system has to do with color, and "A" is
    > >lighter than "B." It's a matter of personal taste, of course, but we
    > >think Grade B has a richer taste.

    >
    > Ah... I thought 'a grade' meant it must be the best... this bottle was
    > from 'Maple Farms' and it says it's 100% pure A grade dark amber
    > syrup. Like I said, it doesn't taste very maply to me...
    > ~Karen aka Kajikit
    > Crafts, cats, and chocolate - the three essentials of life
    > http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    > *remove 'nospam' to reply


    The grade has a lot to do with how strong the flavor is. A is more delicate
    than B, and if you're in mapleareas you can find C too. I prefer B, whereas
    my wife prefers A. It's a matter of taste.

    Kyle
     
  12. Jessica V.

    Jessica V. Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:

    > "Dave Smith" <adavid.smith@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    > news:4224DD28.168CB8DB@sympatico.ca...
    >
    >>aem wrote:r two things when
    >>
    >>
    >>>shopping for maple syrup. It should say "100% Pure," and it should say
    >>>"U.S. Grade B." The grading system has to do with color, and "A" is
    >>>lighter than "B." It's a matter of personal taste, of course, but we
    >>>think Grade B has a richer taste.
    >>>

    >>
    >>The stuff I buy must be C. It is the late harvest, much darker and deeper
    >>taste.

    >
    >
    > I tried to buy the grade B once, online ... holy crap, was it expensive. I
    > can live with the usual grade A for that amount of money. I *think* I'm
    > going to New Hampshire this May, maybe I can find some B for a
    > reasonable price.
    >
    > nancy
    >
    >


    Last year grade B was round about $40 a gallon in northern New England.
    Big plain jug...be careful taking it home if you are going by plane
    box it with pleanty of padding and pray that it doesn't rupture in transit.

    Jessica
     
  13. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    at Tue, 01 Mar 2005 18:29:31 GMT in <asc921hb162loavedimbg5016t9phhs9p3@
    4ax.com>, kanospamjikit@gmail.com (Karen AKA Kajikit) wrote :

    >I bought a bottle of 'real' maple syrup in the supermarket. It wasn't
    >the cheapest and it wasn't the most expensive... but it was very runny
    >and thin tasting, and very disappointing. The bottle's almost gone, so
    >I want something nicer for the next one... any suggestions for maple
    >syrup brands in Florida?


    Shady Maple Farms' Clearly Maple is so thick it's best to *spoon* it out.
    It has the consistency of thick honey or malt syrup. As a side benefit it
    happens to be organic as well. Check your local health food stores. It's
    not packaged in a bottle, btw, it's in a jar. So don't be looking for a
    bottle format. No thin taste here. (oh, and yes, it's pure maple syrup)

    --
    Alex Rast
    ad.rast.7@nwnotlink.NOSPAM.com
    (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
  14. Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    > "Dave Smith" <adavid.smith@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    > news:4224DD28.168CB8DB@sympatico.ca...
    > > aem wrote:r two things when
    > >
    > >> shopping for maple syrup. It should say "100% Pure," and it should say
    > >> "U.S. Grade B." The grading system has to do with color, and "A" is
    > >> lighter than "B." It's a matter of personal taste, of course, but we
    > >> think Grade B has a richer taste.
    > >>

    > >
    > > The stuff I buy must be C. It is the late harvest, much darker and deeper
    > > taste.

    >
    > I tried to buy the grade B once, online ... holy crap, was it expensive. I
    > can live with the usual grade A for that amount of money. I *think* I'm
    > going to New Hampshire this May, maybe I can find some B for a
    > reasonable price.
    >
    > nancy


    Come to PA for the PA Maple Festival in Meyersdale, PA.
    You can get a quart of grade B for about $9 or $9.50.
    That's where I'll be going in April to get my syrup so
    I can finally make those RI johnny cakes from the meal
    I bought there last fall. I was out of syrup so I threw
    the meal in the freezer to keep until I could restock
    at the maple festival. I refuse to pay more than what
    they charge at the festival! In VT they wanted $13-$16
    a qt. No way, Jose!
    Kate
    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:connally@pitt.edu
     
  15. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Kate Connally" <connally@pitt.edu> wrote in message
    news:4225E60A.6983584C@pitt.edu...
    > Nancy Young wrote:


    >> I tried to buy the grade B once, online ... holy crap, was it expensive.
    >> I
    >> can live with the usual grade A for that amount of money. I *think* I'm
    >> going to New Hampshire this May, maybe I can find some B for a
    >> reasonable price.


    > Come to PA for the PA Maple Festival in Meyersdale, PA.


    The problem is, you can't get to PA from here.

    > You can get a quart of grade B for about $9 or $9.50.


    Wow, the quotes I got were 4 times that.

    > That's where I'll be going in April to get my syrup so
    > I can finally make those RI johnny cakes from the meal
    > I bought there last fall. I was out of syrup so I threw
    > the meal in the freezer to keep until I could restock
    > at the maple festival. I refuse to pay more than what
    > they charge at the festival! In VT they wanted $13-$16
    > a qt. No way, Jose!


    Thanks for the heads up, I would really like to try it. I have
    a real hankering for waffles.

    nancy
     
  16. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "pennyaline" <nsmitchell@spamspamspamspamspamspamspameggandspam.com> wrote

    > I think most of the contributors to this group are label readers and
    > savvy-enough consumers to distinguish real maple syrup from "real maple
    > flavor."


    That made me laugh. What ding dong thinks Log Cabin is the real thing?
    Don't get me wrong, I grew up on that, but once I was buying my own
    food, I knew to look for the real deal. Of course, I didn't have to feed
    four kids. It's not cheap.

    Oh, I just remembered ... the inlaws of the infamous turkey sandwich fame,
    we went over for breakfast one day, they made pancakes. I can't think
    how they made it (the syrup) except maybe they melted sugar and added
    maple flavoring? Geez, why bother? They live in Michigan, can't they
    get maple syrup there? I mean, it's not like they can't afford it or
    anything.

    nancy
     
  17. Hal

    Hal Guest

    Jim Lahue wrote:
    >I, too, prefer grade B (...that's what I
    > grew up with: both my parents came
    > from Vermont...). I now live in central
    > Texas and I buy my maple syrup by the
    > ounce through stores that sell it in bulk
    > (such as Whole Foods or Central
    > Market). Much of the maple syrup in
    > glass containers in the stores is watery
    > junk. I don't know how easy it will be for
    > you to find grade B syrup in a regular
    > store.


    >Jim Lahue


    I have seen grade B in Trader Joe's but I have not tried it. I do not
    remember the price but as I recall it was typical TJ's priceing, not
    wallet busting.

    DOGS RULE
     
  18. Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    > "Kate Connally" <connally@pitt.edu> wrote in message
    > news:4225E60A.6983584C@pitt.edu...
    > > Nancy Young wrote:

    >
    > >> I tried to buy the grade B once, online ... holy crap, was it expensive.
    > >> I
    > >> can live with the usual grade A for that amount of money. I *think* I'm
    > >> going to New Hampshire this May, maybe I can find some B for a
    > >> reasonable price.

    >
    > > Come to PA for the PA Maple Festival in Meyersdale, PA.

    >
    > The problem is, you can't get to PA from here.


    :p Can, too! Actually "here" is *in* PA. What you
    meant to say was that you can't get to PA from "there".
    But if you can get from "there" to "here" you can get
    to PA from "here".

    > > You can get a quart of grade B for about $9 or $9.50.

    >
    > Wow, the quotes I got were 4 times that.
    >
    > > That's where I'll be going in April to get my syrup so
    > > I can finally make those RI johnny cakes from the meal
    > > I bought there last fall. I was out of syrup so I threw
    > > the meal in the freezer to keep until I could restock
    > > at the maple festival. I refuse to pay more than what
    > > they charge at the festival! In VT they wanted $13-$16
    > > a qt. No way, Jose!

    >
    > Thanks for the heads up, I would really like to try it. I have
    > a real hankering for waffles.


    If you want to read about the maple festival and get the
    dates just google "PA Maple Festival".

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:connally@pitt.edu
     
  19. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Kate Connally" <connally@pitt.edu> wrote

    >> > Come to PA for the PA Maple Festival in Meyersdale, PA.

    >>
    >> The problem is, you can't get to PA from here.

    >
    > :p Can, too! Actually "here" is *in* PA. What you
    > meant to say was that you can't get to PA from "there".


    But I'm here!

    > But if you can get from "there" to "here" you can get
    > to PA from "here".


    Yeah, but it's a huge hassle. I mean, it's not as if I have to
    walk or anything, but it's a process.

    Thanks for the info.

    nancy (from here)
     
  20. Scott

    Scott Guest

    Anyone try birch syrup? I saw it mentioned somewhere... perhaps NPR...
    and every now and then it occurs to me to try and buy some. This means
    mail order, and the stuff isn't cheap.

    Is it worth it?

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
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