ruptured lumbar disc and massage

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by John Smith, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    So, in massage therapist training, what do they teach you
    about management and treatment of a ruptured lumbar disc?

    JS
     
    Tags:


  2. Ahh, the ruptured lumbar disc story. I really wish I could
    be impressed with
    it. And tell you how much muscle work is involved. But for
    you, instead, I've copied what I said in 1999 on my
    'home' newsgroup, alt.med.fibromyalgia. You're welcome
    to get it from Google. Copy follows:>>>>>

    The process is really neat, if this describes you. There is
    a muscle, the iliocostalis, that goes all the way down from
    the upper back to the sacrum. It is a frequent spasm area.
    Anyway, where it is connected to the sacrum, it sits over
    the top of the multifidus to the third lumbar vertebra.
    Don't worry about the muscle names, just follow the process.
    This muscle touches the fourth lumbar nerve near where it
    exits the spine. So when the iliocostalis causes the
    multifidus to go into spasm, the lumbar nerve becomes
    trapped, and the process can be quite painful. But even if
    it is numbed by endorphins, the body's reaction to the nerve
    irritation is to try to pull the multifidus to the third
    lumbar away from the nerve. So, on the OPPOSITE SIDE, the
    quadratus lumborum to the third lumbar vertebra becomes
    tensed to draw the vertebra down on that side, and up on the
    other, to take the pressure off the nerve. So this guarding
    reflex becomes a permanent condition, the muscles involved
    are in steady spasm, and it can even cause the appearance of
    a skewed torso. And if the process causes the psoas to
    become involved, the foot on the 'pulling' side will likely
    be rotated outward. But X-ray and MRI of the back will be
    'normal'. Interesting how a muscle that only comes near the
    spine can cause problems to appear on the opposite side of
    the spine. Actually, on both sides, with the trapped nerve
    on one side, the muscle in steady spasm on the other. But of
    course, your mileage may vary.

    End copy>>>>>

    John Smith <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So, in massage therapist training, what do they teach you
    > about management and treatment of a ruptured lumbar disc?
    >
    > JS
     
  3. C'mon, folks. Don't make me be the only one to respond to
    John's question!!! Especially since I didn't actually
    answer it, but rather just mentioned some of the possibly
    involved anatomy.

    Michael Baugh <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > Ahh, the ruptured lumbar disc story. I really wish I could
    > be impressed
    with
    > it. And tell you how much muscle work is involved. But for
    > you, instead, I've copied what I said in 1999 on my
    > 'home' newsgroup, alt.med.fibromyalgia. You're welcome
    > to get it from Google. Copy follows:>>>>>
    >
    > The process is really neat, if this describes you. There
    > is a muscle, the iliocostalis, that goes all the way down
    > from the upper back to the sacrum. It is a frequent spasm
    > area. Anyway, where it is connected to the sacrum, it sits
    > over the top of the multifidus to the third lumbar
    > vertebra. Don't worry about the muscle names, just follow
    > the process. This muscle touches the fourth lumbar nerve
    > near where it exits the spine. So when the iliocostalis
    > causes the multifidus to go into spasm, the lumbar nerve
    > becomes trapped, and the process can be quite painful. But
    > even if it is numbed by endorphins, the body's reaction to
    > the nerve irritation is to try to pull the multifidus to
    > the third lumbar away from the nerve. So, on the OPPOSITE
    > SIDE, the quadratus lumborum to the third lumbar vertebra
    > becomes tensed to draw the vertebra down on that
    side,
    > and up on the other, to take the pressure off the nerve.
    > So this guarding reflex becomes a permanent condition, the
    > muscles involved are in steady spasm, and it can even
    > cause the appearance of a skewed torso. And if the process
    > causes the psoas to become involved, the foot on the
    > 'pulling' side will likely be rotated outward. But X-ray
    > and MRI of the back will be 'normal'. Interesting how a
    > muscle that only comes near the spine can cause problems
    > to appear on the opposite side of the spine. Actually, on
    > both sides, with the trapped nerve on one side, the muscle
    > in steady spasm on the other. But of course, your mileage
    > may vary.
    >
    > End copy>>>>>
    >
    > John Smith <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > So, in massage therapist training, what do they teach
    > > you about management and treatment of a ruptured
    > > lumbar disc?
    > >
    > > JS
    >
     
  4. Tiffany

    Tiffany Guest

    Give folks some time Michael! :)

    Management and treatment of a ruptured lumbar disc...... I
    am not sure what I was taught in school but since being out
    of school I learned about working muscles involved (see
    Michaels awesome post). I also learned to work with ice if
    there is inflammation in the area, some myofascial
    techniques can be helpful as the area may be extremely
    sensitive and deep pressure would not be appreciated.

    Tiffany

    Michael Baugh <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    > C'mon, folks. Don't make me be the only one to respond to
    > John's question!!! Especially since I didn't actually
    > answer it, but rather just mentioned some of the possibly
    > involved anatomy.
     
  5. Joe Guy

    Joe Guy Guest

    Commonly, MTs deal with the symptomology of the
    condition, as described by Michael. (Dealing with pain
    and spasm, and offering reassurance.) Also, Mackenzie
    protocol is often prescribed to minimize discomfort and
    allow the disc to heal.

    "Tiffany" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Give folks some time Michael! :)
    >
    > Management and treatment of a ruptured lumbar disc...... I
    > am not sure
    what
    > I was taught in school but since being out of school I
    > learned about
    working
    > muscles involved (see Michaels awesome post). I also
    > learned to work with ice if there is inflammation in the
    > area, some myofascial techniques can
    be
    > helpful as the area may be extremely sensitive and deep
    > pressure would not be appreciated.
    >
    >
    > Tiffany
    >
    >
    > Michael Baugh <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:eek:[email protected]...
    > > C'mon, folks. Don't make me be the only one to respond
    > > to John's question!!! Especially since I didn't actually
    > > answer it, but rather
    just
    > > mentioned some of the possibly involved anatomy.
    > >
     
  6. Jb

    Jb Guest

    It sounds like John Smith wants management and treatment of
    a ruptured lumbar disc, not management and treatment of
    hyprtonic or contracture of soft tissue.

    Thanks

    "John Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > So, in massage therapist training, what do they teach you
    > about management and treatment of a ruptured lumbar disc?
    >
    > JS
     
  7. Jb

    Jb Guest

    It sounds like John Smith wants management and treatment of
    a ruptured lumbar disc, not management and treatment of
    hyprtonic or contracture of soft tissue.

    Thanks

    "Joe Guy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Commonly, MTs deal with the symptomology of the condition,
    > as described by Michael. (Dealing with pain and spasm, and
    > offering reassurance.) Also, Mackenzie protocol is often
    > prescribed to minimize discomfort and allow
    the
    > disc to heal.
    >
    >
    > "Tiffany" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Give folks some time Michael! :)
    > >
    > > Management and treatment of a ruptured lumbar disc......
    > > I am not sure
    > what
    > > I was taught in school but since being out of school I
    > > learned about
    > working
    > > muscles involved (see Michaels awesome post). I also
    > > learned to work
    with
    > > ice if there is inflammation in the area, some
    > > myofascial techniques can
    > be
    > > helpful as the area may be extremely sensitive and deep
    > > pressure would
    not
    > > be appreciated.
    > >
    > >
    > > Tiffany
    > >
    > >
    > > Michael Baugh <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:eek:[email protected]...
    > > > C'mon, folks. Don't make me be the only one to respond
    > > > to John's question!!! Especially since I didn't
    > > > actually answer it, but rather
    > just
    > > > mentioned some of the possibly involved anatomy.
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
     
  8. Joe Guy

    Joe Guy Guest

    I guess that's why I recommended Mackenzie protocol. Thanks
    for your gifted insight though...

    "JB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It sounds like John Smith wants management and treatment
    > of a ruptured lumbar disc, not management and treatment of
    > hyprtonic or contracture of soft tissue.
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Joe Guy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Commonly, MTs deal with the symptomology of the
    > > condition, as described
    by
    > > Michael. (Dealing with pain and spasm, and offering
    > > reassurance.)
    Also,
    > > Mackenzie protocol is often prescribed to minimize
    > > discomfort and allow
    > the
    > > disc to heal.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Tiffany" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Give folks some time Michael! :)
    > > >
    > > > Management and treatment of a ruptured lumbar
    > > > disc...... I am not sure
    > > what
    > > > I was taught in school but since being out of school I
    > > > learned about
    > > working
    > > > muscles involved (see Michaels awesome post). I also
    > > > learned to work
    > with
    > > > ice if there is inflammation in the area, some
    > > > myofascial techniques
    can
    > > be
    > > > helpful as the area may be extremely sensitive and
    > > > deep pressure would
    > not
    > > > be appreciated.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Tiffany
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Michael Baugh <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > message
    > > > news:eek:[email protected]...
    > > > > C'mon, folks. Don't make me be the only one to
    > > > > respond to John's question!!! Especially since I
    > > > > didn't actually answer it, but rather
    > > just
    > > > > mentioned some of the possibly involved anatomy.
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  9. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    I'm still listening. Thanks for all the feedback.

    JS

    Joe Guy wrote:
    > I guess that's why I recommended Mackenzie protocol.
    > Thanks for your gifted insight though...
    >
    >
    > "JB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>It sounds like John Smith wants management and treatment
    >>of a ruptured lumbar disc, not management and treatment of
    >>hyprtonic or contracture of soft tissue.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>Thanks
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>"Joe Guy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>>Commonly, MTs deal with the symptomology of the
    >>>condition, as described
    >
    > by
    >
    >>>Michael. (Dealing with pain and spasm, and offering
    >>>reassurance.)
    >
    > Also,
    >
    >>>Mackenzie protocol is often prescribed to minimize
    >>>discomfort and allow
    >>
    >>the
    >>
    >>>disc to heal.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>"Tiffany" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]...
    >>>
    >>>>Give folks some time Michael! :)
    >>>>
    >>>>Management and treatment of a ruptured lumbar disc......
    >>>>I am not sure
    >>>
    >>>what
    >>>
    >>>>I was taught in school but since being out of school I
    >>>>learned about
    >>>
    >>>working
    >>>
    >>>>muscles involved (see Michaels awesome post). I also
    >>>>learned to work
    >>
    >>with
    >>
    >>>>ice if there is inflammation in the area, some
    >>>>myofascial techniques
    >
    > can
    >
    >>>be
    >>>
    >>>>helpful as the area may be extremely sensitive and deep
    >>>>pressure would
    >>
    >>not
    >>
    >>>>be appreciated.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Tiffany
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Michael Baugh <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>news:eek:[email protected]...
    >>>>
    >>>>>C'mon, folks. Don't make me be the only one to respond
    >>>>>to John's question!!! Especially since I didn't
    >>>>>actually answer it, but rather
    >>>
    >>>just
    >>>
    >>>>>mentioned some of the possibly involved anatomy.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>
     
Loading...