Rust in seatstay?



S

Simon Bennett

Guest
I notice that when I turn my frame upside down I can hear particles tinkling
down the insides of the seatstays, could it be rust or might there be
another explanation? Some by product of the manufacturing process?

The frame is steel (Columbus 'Max'), I've had it for 2 years, I believe it's
about 12 years old. The tinkling sound has always been there, it's not
getting any worse, and there are no outward signs of rust.
 
Simon Bennett <[email protected]> wrote:

> I notice that when I turn my frame upside down I can hear particles tinkling
> down the insides of the seatstays, could it be rust or might there be
> another explanation? Some by product of the manufacturing process?
>
> The frame is steel (Columbus 'Max'), I've had it for 2 years, I believe it's
> about 12 years old. The tinkling sound has always been there, it's not
> getting any worse, and there are no outward signs of rust.


Quite probably muck and rust.They do rust first on the inside, as the
insides are largely not painted/coated at the factory, so once it has
been out in wet weather, there will be water inside the frame, then
condensation will spread it throughout the inside of the tubes.
Alan.
--
To reply by e-mail, change the ' + ' to 'plus'.
 
A.Lee wrote:

> Quite probably muck and rust.They do rust first on the inside, as the
> insides are largely not painted/coated at the factory, so once it has
> been out in wet weather, there will be water inside the frame, then
> condensation will spread it throughout the inside of the tubes.


I'm almost convinced; what I don't understand is how moisture got into the
seatstays as they are separate from the rest of the frame (no internal
passageways for moisture).

Do you think I should be concerned?

The main tubes show no signs of rust.
 
Simon Bennett wrote:

> I'm almost convinced; what I don't understand is how moisture got
> into the seatstays as they are separate from the rest of the frame
> (no internal passageways for moisture).


There may well be a small hole in each of the stays to allow hot air to
escape during the brazing/welding together of the frame. IIRC my Revell has
them just above the join with the drop-outs. If there is one, you can spray
some variety of rust inhibitor therein and shake vigorously.

--
Dave Larrington
<http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk>
I thought I saw his name on a jar of marmalade the other day,
but when I looked more closely, I saw it read 'thick cut'.
 
Simon Bennett <[email protected]> wrote:
> A.Lee wrote:
> > Quite probably muck and rust.They do rust first on the inside, as the
> > insides are largely not painted/coated at the factory, so once it has
> > been out in wet weather, there will be water inside the frame, then
> > condensation will spread it throughout the inside of the tubes.

>
> I'm almost convinced; what I don't understand is how moisture got into the
> seatstays as they are separate from the rest of the frame (no internal
> passageways for moisture).
> Do you think I should be concerned?
> The main tubes show no signs of rust.


There is always a hole in them somwhere.It only takes a pinhole to let
moisture in, and once it is in, it is difficult to get out.
The frames I have seen 'rotten away' have always been where the chain
stays meet the BB, probably the point that gets flexed the most, as well
as being at the botton, where any moisture can collect, and corrode the
metal.
I wouldnt worry, use it until it breaks, or, if needed, justify it to
the other half as a reason to buy a new frame - perhaps that is a better
option, you dont want to crash, and all the other bits are outdated, so
you NEED a new bike, because this one is rotting away.
Well, thats the reason I'd use!
Alan.
--
To reply by e-mail, change the ' + ' to 'plus'.
 
Dave Larrington wrote:

> There may well be a small hole in each of the stays


Oh yes.

> You can spray some variety of rust inhibitor therein and shake
> vigorously.


Any recommendations?
 
A.Lee wrote:

> I wouldnt worry, use it until it breaks, or, if needed, justify it to
> the other half as a reason to buy a new frame


I would, but this is such a lovely frame it might justify repair.
 
Simon Bennett wrote on 27/10/2006 11:30 +0100:
>
> Any recommendations?
>


The readily available Waxoyl or its much rarer and lighter cousin
Framesaver. Some people use diluted linseed oil.
http://aebike.com/page.cfm?action=details&Affiliate=1&PageID=30&SKU=LU7500

Before you worry too much the noise is much more likely to be small
beads of metal left over from the frame joining. They tend to make more
of a tinkly sound than rust which sounds more like sand on a shovel.

--
Tony

"Anyone who conducts an argument by appealing to authority is not using
his intelligence; he is just using his memory."
- Leonardo da Vinci
 
In article <[email protected]>
Simon Bennett <[email protected]> wrote:
> I notice that when I turn my frame upside down I can hear particles tinkling
> down the insides of the seatstays, could it be rust or might there be
> another explanation? Some by product of the manufacturing process?
>
> The frame is steel (Columbus 'Max'), I've had it for 2 years, I believe it's
> about 12 years old. The tinkling sound has always been there, it's not
> getting any worse, and there are no outward signs of rust.
>

If it's tinkling it's more likely bits of brazing metal or flux than
rust - rust makes more of a shooshing sound.
 
My new frame had something tinkling in it. A vigarous shaking fixed that.

Same with my Tortec rack except the stuff was too large to come out. So I
dropped in some epoxy resin through each hole, shook and tilted again and
the particles must have stuck to the glue, where hopefully they will stay
forever.

Incidentally, I think it's a good idea to block any air holes in the stays
to stop water getting in and running down to the bottom bracket. Leave the
one under the BB though - that is meant to be a drainage hole (water could
still arrive from elsewhere). Consider drilling one if you don't have one.

~PB