Rusty hardware. How to prevent?



M

Mike Elliott

Guest
I don't buy bikes at the upper, or even the middle, echelon of prices.
Maybe high-end bikes have ti or platinum hardware, but the hardware on
the bikes in my price range tend to be shiny steel. At first. Then over
the a period of a year or so, the nuts and bolts start to rust. I know
it's mainly a cosmetic issue, but I'm riding along and the bolt in the
top center of the headset is looking at me like some dull rusty eyeball
.. . . when it used to be a cheery bright shiny one . . . and I wonder,
"Is there anything I could have done when the bike was new to prevent
this rusting?"

Well, now I have a new bike, and I'd like to know: is there anything I
can do to protect the hardware before it's Too Late?

- mike elliott
 
Boeshield. Developed by Boeing Corp. to shield airplanes from
corrosion. I am slowly stripping and rechroming a bicycle frame;
whenever i finish a session i spray it with Boeshield, and it does not
rust, the metal just sits there without rusting, it's been 6 weeks so
far, and I live fairly close to the ocean.

Another choice is to wax the part with a good butcher's paste wax, and
repeat every 6 months (or more often if the part is frequently rubbed
by hands, feet, or drenched in sweat, etc.)

- Don Gillies
San Diego, CA
 
Mike Elliott wrote:
> I don't buy bikes at the upper, or even the middle, echelon of prices.
> .....
> "Is there anything I could have done when the bike was new to prevent
> this rusting?"
>
> Well, now I have a new bike, and I'd like to know: is there anything I
> can do to protect the hardware before it's Too Late?
>

Aluminum instead of steel headsets and stems helps a lot. But that is
appropriate for someone building a new bike. Not much help to you.

I just built up a bike with a steel quill stem. I painted it with some
black engine paint that I had in the garage. It came out surprisingly
nice looking but it hasn't been long enough to tell how well it will
prevent rust.

Tom
 
Donald Gillies wrote:
> Boeshield. Developed by Boeing Corp. to shield airplanes from
> corrosion. I am slowly stripping and rechroming a bicycle frame;
> whenever i finish a session i spray it with Boeshield, and it does not
> rust, the metal just sits there without rusting, it's been 6 weeks so
> far, and I live fairly close to the ocean.
>
> Another choice is to wax the part with a good butcher's paste wax, and
> repeat every 6 months (or more often if the part is frequently rubbed
> by hands, feet, or drenched in sweat, etc.)
>
> - Don Gillies
> San Diego, CA
>


Boeshield -- got some. Thanks. Given this nasty, muggy weather we've
been having in coastal San Diego county, if your steel parts haven't
been rusting, then I reckon that Boeshield is as good as it gets for
this. Thanks, Don!

-- mike elliott
 
On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 15:02:41 -0700, Mike Elliott
<[email protected]> wrote:

>I don't buy bikes at the upper, or even the middle, echelon of prices.
>Maybe high-end bikes have ti or platinum hardware, but the hardware on
>the bikes in my price range tend to be shiny steel. At first. Then over
>the a period of a year or so, the nuts and bolts start to rust. I know
>it's mainly a cosmetic issue, but I'm riding along and the bolt in the
>top center of the headset is looking at me like some dull rusty eyeball
>. . . when it used to be a cheery bright shiny one . . . and I wonder,
>"Is there anything I could have done when the bike was new to prevent
>this rusting?"
>
>Well, now I have a new bike, and I'd like to know: is there anything I
>can do to protect the hardware before it's Too Late?
>
>- mike elliott



I have to wash(atleast rinse) my bike weekly. I have found, the
longer I allow mud(even dry) stay on my bike, it causes rust. I have
a few spots of rust now that weren't there when I bought it a few
months ago. The majority of spots I see now, are out of the way
inaccessible areas, and inside hex heads. After washing the bike, I
dry it off, and then add a tiny drop of oil to inside hex heads, and
spots I see rust. The oil is spreads out and protects the metal from
even caked on mud.

So cleaning bike, and apply rust protective coating can help.

Just my experiences.

imho,

tom @ www.NoCostAds.com
 
Mike Elliott <[email protected]> wrote in news:McqdneQbUr-
[email protected]:

snip

>
> Well, now I have a new bike, and I'd like to know: is there anything I
> can do to protect the hardware before it's Too Late?
>
> - mike elliott


Clear nail polish.
Clear Krylon spray lacquer.
Replace bolts with stainless steel bolts.

Rich
 
Richard B wrote:
> Mike Elliott <[email protected]> wrote in news:McqdneQbUr-
> [email protected]:
>
> snip
>
>> Well, now I have a new bike, and I'd like to know: is there anything I
>> can do to protect the hardware before it's Too Late?
>>
>> - mike elliott

>
> Clear nail polish.
> Clear Krylon spray lacquer.
> Replace bolts with stainless steel bolts.
>


In that order? ;-)

- mike elliott
 
Mike Rocket J Squirrel <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> Richard B wrote:
>> Mike Elliott <[email protected]> wrote in news:McqdneQbUr-
>> [email protected]:
>>
>> snip
>>
>>> Well, now I have a new bike, and I'd like to know: is there anything
>>> I can do to protect the hardware before it's Too Late?
>>>
>>> - mike elliott

>>
>> Clear nail polish.
>> Clear Krylon spray lacquer.
>> Replace bolts with stainless steel bolts.
>>

>
> In that order? ;-)
>
> - mike elliott
>


No, just some suggestions.

Clear nail polish is cheap and covers and seals small areas nicely.
Clear Krylon spray is a little more expensive and covers large areas
well.
And stainless steel bolts may be a little more expensive and will entail
some expenditure of labor but they will never rust.

Rich
 
Mike Elliott wrote:
> Well, now I have a new bike, and I'd like to know: is there anything I
> can do to protect the hardware before it's Too Late?


I live in the corrosion capital (or so I hear) and I keep my bike from
rusting by drying it with a fan whenever it gets wet... then spray with
silicone. I suspect that higher-end components are much less
susceptible to corrosion, though.