rusty wheels

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by PhilD, Jan 12, 2006.

  1. PhilD

    PhilD Guest

    I ride a Raleigh Sports (amongst other things). Well, strictly it is a
    reproduction Sports, a little over 2 years old. I usually ride this
    bike 2 or 3 times a week, all weathers.

    I noticed today that the rear rim is very rusty in sort of spots all
    round. It looks a bit like it's got chicken pox. The front rim is
    barely grubby, let alone rusty.

    Why the difference? As far as I can tell, the wheels are the same age,
    where the one goes so the other follows, they receive identical care
    and attention, and so on.

    Also, any good suggestions for removing rust and re-chroming (short of
    dismantling the bike and sending parts to a company allied to the
    chemical industry in some way)?

    Thanks,

    PhilD

    --
    <><
     
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  2. Richard

    Richard Guest

    PhilD wrote:

    > I noticed today that the rear rim is very rusty in sort of spots all
    > round.


    On the sidewall of the wheel where the brakes press, or on the middle
    bit where the spokes are, or both?

    > Also, any good suggestions for removing rust and re-chroming (short of
    > dismantling the bike and sending parts to a company allied to the
    > chemical industry in some way)?


    Personally, I wouldn't; I'd buy an aluminium wheel instead which doesn't
    rust (yes, I know it does, but...). It will be lighter (and the
    braking will be improved, although on a rear wheel that doesn't make
    very much difference; if, however, you say the front wheel is also
    steel-rimmed, I'd run (do not cycle ;-) to the nearest decent bike shop
    and buy an ally one. Your braking, particularly in the wet, will
    improve by a zillion times.

    If you're really, really keen to keep the steel wheels for whatever
    reason, it's possible to get them rechromed properly at your local
    chromery; see the yellow pages, probably under motorbike garages.
    You'd need to strip them down, however, to the bare rims and then
    rebuild them afterwords.

    R.
     
  3. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    PhilD wrote:
    > I ride a Raleigh Sports (amongst other things). Well, strictly it is a
    > reproduction Sports, a little over 2 years old. I usually ride this
    > bike 2 or 3 times a week, all weathers.
    >
    > I noticed today that the rear rim is very rusty in sort of spots all
    > round. It looks a bit like it's got chicken pox. The front rim is
    > barely grubby, let alone rusty.


    You ride a bike with steel rims in all weathers? Do you not find the
    power of the brakes a little on the low side when it rains?

    > Why the difference? As far as I can tell, the wheels are the same age,
    > where the one goes so the other follows, they receive identical care
    > and attention, and so on.


    If you always brake with the rear brake, that could cause a difference.

    > Also, any good suggestions for removing rust and re-chroming (short of
    > dismantling the bike and sending parts to a company allied to the
    > chemical industry in some way)?


    Possibly not the answer you're looking for, but a replacement wheel with
    an alloy rim would certainly rust less, with the added benefit of being
    able to stop in the wet.

    --
    JimP
    --
    "We don't have a plan, so nothing can go wrong" - Spike Milligan
     
  4. PhilD

    PhilD Guest

    Richard wrote:
    > On the sidewall of the wheel where the brakes press, or on the middle
    > bit where the spokes are, or both?


    The middle bit. The "middle bit" is quite large, as the rims are
    shaped to take rod brakes. The bike actually has conventional caliper
    brakes: I did not see any rust where the blocks rub.

    By the way, yes steel rims are heavy, but so is the whole bike. It's
    solid steel and feels like it's made of lead! I use it for fun,
    shopping and a challenge (it's particularly fun zooming past "yoof" on
    multi-geared bikes who try and race but can't keep up).

    Nevertheless, thank you for your comments.

    PhilD

    --
    <><
     
  5. Ian Blake

    Ian Blake Guest

    On 12 Jan 2006 07:29:28 -0800, "PhilD" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I noticed today that the rear rim is very rusty in sort of spots all
    >round. It looks a bit like it's got chicken pox. The front rim is
    >barely grubby, let alone rusty.
    >
    >Why the difference? As far as I can tell, the wheels are the same age,
    >where the one goes so the other follows, they receive identical care
    >and attention, and so on.
    >


    The back wheel is sprayed by some of the muck thrown up by the front
    wheel. The front wheel usually rides in clear air unless there is a
    vehicle in front. More muck usually leads to more corrosion.
     
  6. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    PhilD wrote:
    > I ride a Raleigh Sports (amongst other things). Well, strictly it is
    > a reproduction Sports, a little over 2 years old. I usually ride this
    > bike 2 or 3 times a week, all weathers.
    >
    > I noticed today that the rear rim is very rusty in sort of spots all
    > round. It looks a bit like it's got chicken pox. The front rim is
    > barely grubby, let alone rusty.
    >
    > Why the difference? As far as I can tell, the wheels are the same
    > age, where the one goes so the other follows, they receive identical
    > care and attention, and so on.


    More rubbish lands on the rear wheel and damages the surface. Chrome
    itself doesn't rust but damage the chrome and the steel underneath rusts
    and comes out to the surface.

    > Also, any good suggestions for removing rust and re-chroming (short of
    > dismantling the bike and sending parts to a company allied to the
    > chemical industry in some way)?


    I would have though re-chroming must be done professionally. Is it worth
    it anyway considering alloy rims can't rust, provide far better braking
    and are lighter and stronger? (Stronger due to the way they're made and
    amount of metal).

    Meantime, metal polish does wonders (eg. Autosol). Very lightly sand if
    necessary, but too much abrasion will eventually make the rust come back
    worse than ever (although might make it look better at first).

    ~PB, sold lots of second-hand "racers" with steel rims in a previous life
     
  7. "PhilD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I ride a Raleigh Sports (amongst other things). Well, strictly it is a
    > reproduction Sports, a little over 2 years old. I usually ride this
    > bike 2 or 3 times a week, all weathers.
    >
    > I noticed today that the rear rim is very rusty in sort of spots all
    > round. It looks a bit like it's got chicken pox. The front rim is
    > barely grubby, let alone rusty.
    >
    > Why the difference? As far as I can tell, the wheels are the same age,
    > where the one goes so the other follows, they receive identical care
    > and attention, and so on.
    >
    > Also, any good suggestions for removing rust and re-chroming (short of
    > dismantling the bike and sending parts to a company allied to the
    > chemical industry in some way)?
    >


    A lot of people don't bother cleaning the rear wheel so much
    becuase it gets dirtier.
     
  8. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, PhilD
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > I ride a Raleigh Sports (amongst other things). Well, strictly it is a
    > reproduction Sports, a little over 2 years old. I usually ride this
    > bike 2 or 3 times a week, all weathers.


    Something wrong here. Aluminium rims don't rust (obviously), and steel
    rims have not been used on bikes of any quality for many years (15? 20?)
    for the very good reason that they're positively lethal in the wet.

    Is this a reproduction antique with antique parts, or what?

    > Also, any good suggestions for removing rust and re-chroming (short of
    > dismantling the bike and sending parts to a company allied to the
    > chemical industry in some way)?


    Unless this is reproduction-for-the-sake-of (in which case, yes you're
    going to have to get it rechromed), replacing the rims with aluminium
    ones would be a much, much better idea.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    ;; Our modern industrial economy takes a mountain covered with trees,
    ;; lakes, running streams and transforms it into a mountain of junk,
    ;; garbage, slime pits, and debris. -- Edward Abbey
     
  9. PhilD wrote:

    > Richard wrote:
    >
    >>On the sidewall of the wheel where the brakes press, or on the middle
    >>bit where the spokes are, or both?

    >
    >
    > The middle bit. The "middle bit" is quite large, as the rims are
    > shaped to take rod brakes. The bike actually has conventional caliper
    > brakes: I did not see any rust where the blocks rub.
    >
    > By the way, yes steel rims are heavy, but so is the whole bike. It's
    > solid steel and feels like it's made of lead! I use it for fun,
    > shopping and a challenge (it's particularly fun zooming past "yoof" on
    > multi-geared bikes who try and race but can't keep up).
    >
    > Nevertheless, thank you for your comments.


    As well as being lighter and rust-free, alloy rims are normally stronger
    than steel. The material is weaker, but alu can be extruded into a
    strong box section, whereas steel is just a flat plate bent into shape.
    And then there's wet weather braking, which is an order of magnitude
    better.
     
  10. Paulmouk

    Paulmouk Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > PhilD wrote:
    >> I ride a Raleigh Sports (amongst other things). Well, strictly it is
    >> a reproduction Sports, a little over 2 years old. I usually ride this
    >> bike 2 or 3 times a week, all weathers.
    >>
    >> I noticed today that the rear rim is very rusty in sort of spots all
    >> round. It looks a bit like it's got chicken pox. The front rim is
    >> barely grubby, let alone rusty.
    >>
    >> Why the difference? As far as I can tell, the wheels are the same
    >> age, where the one goes so the other follows, they receive identical
    >> care and attention, and so on.

    >
    > More rubbish lands on the rear wheel and damages the surface. Chrome
    > itself doesn't rust but damage the chrome and the steel underneath rusts
    > and comes out to the surface.
    >
    >> Also, any good suggestions for removing rust and re-chroming (short of
    >> dismantling the bike and sending parts to a company allied to the
    >> chemical industry in some way)?

    >
    > I would have though re-chroming must be done professionally. Is it worth
    > it anyway considering alloy rims can't rust, provide far better braking
    > and are lighter and stronger? (Stronger due to the way they're made and
    > amount of metal).
    >
    > Meantime, metal polish does wonders (eg. Autosol). Very lightly sand if
    > necessary, but too much abrasion will eventually make the rust come back
    > worse than ever (although might make it look better at first).
    >
    > ~PB, sold lots of second-hand "racers" with steel rims in a previous life


    I seem to remember from my motorbike years (35 yrs ago!) when I used to take
    stuff to a small rechroming place in Norwich, being told that chrome plating
    is slightly porous and rust will come through. Thicker chrome will resist
    rusting better.
    I think they used to copper plate first and then deposit the chrome on that.
    I think. As I said it was a long time ago.
    Lightly sanding will scratch the high shine so only do it if the surface is
    already on the way out. Good chrome polishes contain rust inhibitor.

    Paul.
     
  11. PhilD

    PhilD Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > in message <[email protected]>, PhilD
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    > > I ride a Raleigh Sports (amongst other things). Well, strictly it is a
    > > reproduction Sports, a little over 2 years old. I usually ride this
    > > bike 2 or 3 times a week, all weathers.

    >
    > Something wrong here. Aluminium rims don't rust (obviously), and steel
    > rims have not been used on bikes of any quality for many years (15? 20?)
    > for the very good reason that they're positively lethal in the wet.


    Yes, I've noticed the poor wet-weather braking, but know to allow for
    it (no accidents yet: I intend to keep it that way!)

    > Is this a reproduction antique with antique parts, or what?


    It is a repro, as close as can be. See
    <http://deaves47.users.btopenworld.com/bikes/Lenton.jpg>; made in India
    c1999. It was so authentic that it said "made in Nottingham", with a
    separate sticker saying no, not really.


    > Unless this is reproduction-for-the-sake-of (in which case, yes you're
    > going to have to get it rechromed), replacing the rims with aluminium
    > ones would be a much, much better idea.


    Thanks,

    PhilD

    --
    <><
     
  12. POHB

    POHB Guest

    In my youth I always used Autosol on the chrome bits and it was almost
    miraculous. What started looking like a mass of rust ended up shiney with
    just a few little pits. Of course it didn't last very long but it was good
    while it did.

    >> Also, any good suggestions for removing rust and re-chroming (short of
    >> dismantling the bike and sending parts to a company allied to the
    >> chemical industry in some way)?
    > >

    > Meantime, metal polish does wonders (eg. Autosol). Very lightly sand if
    > necessary, but too much abrasion will eventually make the rust come back
    > worse than ever (although might make it look better at first).
    >
     
  13. soup

    soup Guest

    Richard wrote:
    >buy an aluminium wheel instead which
    > doesn't rust (yes, I know it does, but...).


    <pedant>
    Oh no it doesn't, it can oxidise (well it very readily gets a coating of
    oxide on the surface which protects the rest of it yada yada yada ...)
    but it cannot rust, only items with iron in them can rust.
    </pedant>
    --
    This post contains no hidden meanings, no implications and certainly no
    hidden agendas so it should be taken at face value. The wrong words
    may be used this is due to my limitations with the English language .
     
  14. Richard

    Richard Guest

    soup wrote:
    > Richard wrote:
    >
    >>buy an aluminium wheel instead which
    >>doesn't rust (yes, I know it does, but...).

    >
    >
    > <pedant>
    > Oh no it doesn't, it can oxidise (well it very readily gets a coating of
    > oxide on the surface which protects the rest of it yada yada yada ...)
    > but it cannot rust, only items with iron in them can rust.
    > </pedant>


    I know, I was being concise at the expense of accuracy. :)

    R.
     
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