S&S Couplers

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Ken Huizenga, Mar 9, 2003.

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  1. Ken Huizenga

    Ken Huizenga Guest

    I am considering purchasing my first recumbent. I currently have two upright bike and I rode 2600
    miles on them last year, including my first two centuries. The primary thing I want in my next bike
    is that it be very comfortable for long distance, loaded touring. Portability is also a
    consideration.

    So far I have only identified the Lighting P-38 Voyager as a high quality recumbent which has the
    S&S coupling option. But does it really cost about $1200 for this option...or is that just
    "suggested retail."?

    My other questions are:

    1. Are there some other models I should consider which have good portability for traveling on
    airplanes either with the S&S coupler system or otherwise?

    2. I have some arthritis in my hip which doesn't normally bother me when riding an upright bike
    unless I get too low and far forward to reduce wind resistence. Then the angle of my back to my
    upper leg gets too acute and it bothers my hip. I would guess that riding a recumbent would be a
    non-issue hip-pain wise, but I'm not that familiar with the typical recumbent stroke. If it was
    necessary for my upper leg to come fairly close to my chest at the top of the stroke I might
    have some problems. I know that I should do some test rides to see what is the most comfortable
    for me, and I will when the weather improves around here, but I was just wondering whether
    anyone was familiar with hip joint related issues and particular types of recumbents to avoid.
    (e.g. it may be better for me to have more of a reclining position than to be very upright...or
    perhaps I should avoid the models which have the pedals higher than the seat.)

    3. For loaded touring, what do various member of the group think about racks & panniers vs. using a
    B.O.B. trailer with a recumbent?

    4. What do people think about the Lightning P38 Voyager as a candidate for my first recumbent, given
    what I have said above?

    By the way, I am 50 years old, 6'3" and 245 pounds and other than the hip issue I am in pretty good
    shape with very strong legs.

    Ken Appleton, Wisconsin [email protected]
     
    Tags:


  2. Shortboat

    Shortboat Guest

    Ken: You are so close to one of the best recombent shops around I would suggest you go to Stevens
    Point and try some differant bikes and talk to the experts at the Hostel Shopppe. They wre very
    helpful to me and my wife and if I were to buy another bike you can bet I would drive the 200 miles
    I need to get there for their advise. I am 6 foot and 220 and the Tour Easy was a no brainer for me.
    Especially for touring. Don't know about the traveling by plane thing but I am sure Rolf or Barb
    could help you with that. By the way I hope you plan to attend their rally in August. Check it out
    at their web site. www.hostelshoppe.com Jim Nordly Tour Easy, Screamer TR with S&S couplers.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I am considering purchasing my first recumbent. I currently have two upright bike and I rode 2600
    > miles on them last year, including my first two centuries. The primary thing I want in my next
    > bike is that it be very comfortable for long distance, loaded touring. Portability is also a
    > consideration.
    >
    > So far I have only identified the Lighting P-38 Voyager as a high quality recumbent which has the
    > S&S coupling option. But does it really cost about $1200 for this option...or is that just
    > "suggested retail."?

    This is very close to actual. I spec'd my Voyager through LCD and ordered through my LBS. My LBS
    gave me some overall discount, but You can best figure the $1200 is close to what LCD probably pays
    for S&S to fit the coupling on the bike and the cost of the Suitcase to fit the bike.
    >
    > My other questions are:
    >
    > 1. Are there some other models I should consider which have good portability for traveling on
    > airplanes either with the S&S coupler system or otherwise?

    Other than Going to a Bike Saturday, this is about the best (only) 'bent choice. And not a bad
    one either.
    >
    > 2. I have some arthritis in my hip which doesn't normally bother me when riding an upright bike
    > unless I get too low and far forward to reduce wind resistence. Then the angle of my back to
    > my upper leg gets too acute and it bothers my hip. I would guess that riding a recumbent would
    > be a non-issue hip-pain wise, but I'm not that familiar with the typical recumbent stroke. If
    > it was necessary for my upper leg to come fairly close to my chest at the top of the stroke I
    > might have some problems. I know that I should do some test rides to see what is the most
    > comfortable for me, and I will when the weather improves around here, but I was just wondering
    > whether anyone was familiar with hip joint related issues and particular types of recumbents
    > to avoid. (e.g. it may be better for me to have more of a reclining position than to be very
    > upright...or perhaps I should avoid the models which have the pedals higher than the seat.)

    I can not say what effect the Lightning seat would have on your arthritis. The Lightning seat
    limits the rider to a closed position not too unlike that of an upright in a full tuck position.
    It is a lot more comfortable than riding on a DF with your neck in a crimp. Other SWB 'bent with
    high BB allow for a more reclined seat position So, I would not rule those out if the Lightning
    does not work.

    > 3. For loaded touring, what do various member of the group think about racks & panniers vs. using
    > a B.O.B. trailer with a recumbent?
    >
    My preference is Panniers Under the seat and on a rack in back. I've heard too many negative reports
    on B.O.B. trailers to invest in one. I have a friend that has oe on a P-38 and he will use in to
    haul groceries but not tour. We've toured together in Slovakia and Hungary in 2000.

    > 4. What do people think about the Lightning P38 Voyager as a candidate for my first recumbent,
    > given what I have said above?

    Some people take to them right away, others need to warm up to them. I got mine after a year on a
    LWB RANS Stratus. I took the Stratus to Vienna for the Slovakia trip. I needed to warm up to the
    Lightning. It took me about a year and a half after I got the Voyager before I felt as comfortable
    with it as I did the Stratus. I now have in addition to the Voyager a Bacchetta Giro There was not
    transition form the Voyager to the Giro. I like both bikes equally well. The Voyager will remain my
    travel bike. I'd like the Voyager better if the seat reclined and were as comfortable as the Giro.

    > By the way, I am 50 years old, 6'3" and 245 pounds and other than the hip issue I am in pretty
    > good shape with very strong legs.

    Here are some of my photos that you might find helpful.

    http://www.clee.org/Cycling/voyager_packing/

    http://www.clee.org/Czech_Tour/default.cfm

    I think you need to ride the P-38 and several other bikes before making a $5000 commitment on your
    first recumbent.

    The Voyager is an excellent choice (post 9-11) if flying is in your touring plans.

    I would be happy to answer specific touring/Voyager questions either here or via e-mail.

    --
    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  4. David

    David Guest

    Easy Racers makes a bent with S&S couplers as does Greenspeed. You can get the former from Easy
    Racers ( www.easyracers.com ) while the latter is available from the Hostel Shop (
    www.hostelshoppe.com ).

    Ken Huizenga wrote:
    > I am considering purchasing my first recumbent. I currently have two upright bike and I rode 2600
    > miles on them last year, including my first two centuries. The primary thing I want in my next
    > bike is that it be very comfortable for long distance, loaded touring. Portability is also a
    > consideration.
    >
    > So far I have only identified the Lighting P-38 Voyager as a high quality recumbent which has the
    > S&S coupling option. But does it really cost about $1200 for this option...or is that just
    > "suggested retail."?
    >
    > My other questions are:
    >
    > 1. Are there some other models I should consider which have good portability for traveling on
    > airplanes either with the S&S coupler system or otherwise?
    >
    > 2. I have some arthritis in my hip which doesn't normally bother me when riding an upright bike
    > unless I get too low and far forward to reduce wind resistence. Then the angle of my back to
    > my upper leg gets too acute and it bothers my hip. I would guess that riding a recumbent would
    > be a non-issue hip-pain wise, but I'm not that familiar with the typical recumbent stroke. If
    > it was necessary for my upper leg to come fairly close to my chest at the top of the stroke I
    > might have some problems. I know that I should do some test rides to see what is the most
    > comfortable for me, and I will when the weather improves around here, but I was just wondering
    > whether anyone was familiar with hip joint related issues and particular types of recumbents
    > to avoid. (e.g. it may be better for me to have more of a reclining position than to be very
    > upright...or perhaps I should avoid the models which have the pedals higher than the seat.)
    >
    > 3. For loaded touring, what do various member of the group think about racks & panniers vs. using
    > a B.O.B. trailer with a recumbent?
    >
    > 4. What do people think about the Lightning P38 Voyager as a candidate for my first recumbent,
    > given what I have said above?
    >
    > By the way, I am 50 years old, 6'3" and 245 pounds and other than the hip issue I am in pretty
    > good shape with very strong legs.
    >
    > Ken Appleton, Wisconsin [email protected]
    >
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, cycler68 @nospam.hotmail.com says...
    > Easy Racers makes a bent with S&S couplers as does Greenspeed. You can get the former from
    > Easy Racers ( www.easyracers.com ) while the latter is available from the Hostel Shop (
    > www.hostelshoppe.com ).
    >

    I don't think either are airline legal luggage. Which kinda defeats the purpose of breaking a bike
    into parts. S&S Couplings can be added to any rould tubes triangulated bike. Getting it on an
    airplane without paying an arm and a leg is another matter. It has to fit into a 62" (LWH) limit.

    --
    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  6. On Sun, 09 Mar 2003 21:14:42 -0600, David <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Easy Racers makes a bent with S&S couplers as does Greenspeed. You can get the former from
    > Easy Racers ( www.easyracers.com ) while the latter is available from the Hostel Shop (
    > www.hostelshoppe.com ).

    I don't see an S&S coupled bike on the Easy Racers homepage. Is it an option for the GRR and/or TE?
    Do you know the price?

    LoGo ( http://www.logotrikes.com/ ) also makes S&S coupled trikes. I think the LoGo VFT packs
    smaller than the Greenspeed GTO - it's a smaller trike to begin with, and it has more couplers.
    Trisled ( http://www.trisled.com.au/ ) also makes coupled trikes using a different coupler, but with
    only one coupler it's not small enough for airline travel.

    Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
     
  7. Paul Worden

    Paul Worden Guest

    S&S couplers are expensive and the frame makers that I know, only charge their costs for
    fitting them.

    Paul W. - MR Swift Trike
     
  8. Rorschandt

    Rorschandt Guest

    Ken Kobayashi <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]t:

    > On Sun, 09 Mar 2003 21:14:42 -0600, David <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Easy Racers makes a bent with S&S couplers as does Greenspeed. You can get the former from
    >> Easy Racers ( www.easyracers.com ) while the latter is available from the Hostel Shop (
    >> www.hostelshoppe.com ).
    >
    > I don't see an S&S coupled bike on the Easy Racers homepage. Is it an option for the GRR and/or
    > TE? Do you know the price?
    >
    > LoGo ( http://www.logotrikes.com/ ) also makes S&S coupled trikes. I think the LoGo VFT packs
    > smaller than the Greenspeed GTO - it's a smaller trike to begin with, and it has more couplers.
    > Trisled ( http://www.trisled.com.au/ ) also makes coupled trikes using a different coupler, but
    > with only one coupler it's not small enough for airline travel.
    >
    > Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
    >

    Aiolos makes a folding tadpole http://www.aiolos.de/trilite/trilite.html that might fit to packable
    size. It is quite small when folded.

    rorschandt
     
  9. Rorschandt

    Rorschandt Guest

  10. My $0.02 worth I cannot see the value in spending over $1000. usd on S&S Couplers (unless) you
    have a Tandem and deep pockets. This much $ just to break down a bent occasionally would be a
    waste of money.
    ---------------------------------------------------
    "rorschandt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Ken Kobayashi <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]t:
    >
    > > On Sun, 09 Mar 2003 21:14:42 -0600, David <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Easy Racers makes a bent with S&S couplers as does Greenspeed. You can get the former from
    > >> Easy Racers ( www.easyracers.com ) while the latter is available from the Hostel Shop (
    > >> www.hostelshoppe.com ).
    > >
    > > I don't see an S&S coupled bike on the Easy Racers homepage. Is it an option for the GRR and/or
    > > TE? Do you know the price?
    > >
    > > LoGo ( http://www.logotrikes.com/ ) also makes S&S coupled trikes. I think the LoGo VFT packs
    > > smaller than the Greenspeed GTO - it's a smaller trike to begin with, and it has more couplers.
    > > Trisled ( http://www.trisled.com.au/ ) also makes coupled trikes using a different coupler, but
    > > with only one coupler it's not small enough for airline travel.
    > >
    > > Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
    > >
    >
    > Aiolos makes a folding tadpole http://www.aiolos.de/trilite/trilite.html that might fit to
    > packable size. It is quite small when folded.
    >
    > rorschandt
     
  11. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > My $0.02 worth I cannot see the value in spending over $1000. usd on S&S Couplers (unless) you
    > have a Tandem and deep pockets. This much $ just to break down a bent occasionally would be a
    > waste of money.

    Airlines are charging around $100 (one-way) to take your bike as Excess Baggage. At $200 a trip, S&S
    Couplings and case will pay for itself in 5 or 6 trips. That was the rational I used to justify
    getting a Voyager. In two more trips by air. the Voyager option will have paid for itself. The next
    trip is MoM this Spring.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  12. this was why I said "occasionally"...for a frequent flyer the S&S Couplers (would) make sense
    -------------------------------------
    "Cletus Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > >
    > > My $0.02 worth I cannot see the value in spending over $1000. usd on S&S Couplers
    (unless)
    > > you have a Tandem and deep pockets. This much $ just to break down a bent occasionally would be
    > > a waste of money.
    >
    > Airlines are charging around $100 (one-way) to take your bike as Excess
    Baggage. At $200 a
    > trip, S&S Couplings and case will pay for itself in 5 or 6 trips. That
    was the rational I used
    > to justify getting a Voyager. In two more trips by air. the Voyager option
    will have paid for
    > itself. The next trip is MoM this Spring.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  13. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > this was why I said "occasionally"...for a frequent flyer the S&S Couplers (would) make sense
    >
    I consider flying a bike once or twice a year to be occasional.
    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  14. I tend to change bents every 2 years and it would seem some here do it more often. To break even
    you'd need to do 6 flights before selling your bent...but then again even a single flight to another
    country with a bent in tow might be well worth it. Plus it would certainly increase the resale value
    of any bent.
    --------------------------------
    "Cletus Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > > this was why I said "occasionally"...for a frequent flyer the S&S
    Couplers
    > > (would) make sense
    > >
    > I consider flying a bike once or twice a year to be occasional.
    > --
    >
    > Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  15. Ken Huizenga

    Ken Huizenga Guest

    Cletus: Thanks for your very comprehensive reply. I checked out your website...some cool stuff
    there. Your packing list list will definitely come in handy.

    Regarding bents with the S&S coupler option I came accross another today...the Lightfoot Ranger.
    Does anyone have any opinion on this bike? It seems to me it would be quite heavy duty, which may be
    important for me at 245 pounds + a load of stuff.

    In fact, I came across something about the Lightning P38 in this regard that makes me think twice
    about whether it will suit me & my load. The website explains that the XL frame, which has a maximum
    carrying capacity of 250 pounds does not fit in the S&S hard shell case. It further explains that in
    such a situation the thing to do is to order the large frame and then use an XL bottom bracket
    extender. However, since the load capacity of the Large frame is only 220 it seems that such a
    solution wouldn't work for me since I'd have up to 300 pound including gear.

    Thoughts?

    Ken

    "Cletus D. Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > I am considering purchasing my first recumbent. I currently have two upright bike and I rode
    > > 2600 miles on them last year, including my first
    two
    > > centuries. The primary thing I want in my next bike is that it be very comfortable for long
    > > distance, loaded touring. Portability is also a consideration.
    > >
    > > So far I have only identified the Lighting P-38 Voyager as a high
    quality
    > > recumbent which has the S&S coupling option. But does it really cost
    about
    > > $1200 for this option...or is that just "suggested retail."?
    >
    > This is very close to actual. I spec'd my Voyager through LCD and ordered through my LBS. My LBS
    > gave me some overall discount, but You can best figure the $1200 is close to what LCD probably
    > pays for S&S to fit the coupling on the bike and the cost of the Suitcase to fit the bike.
    > >
    > > My other questions are:
    > >
    > > 1. Are there some other models I should consider which have good portability for traveling on
    > > airplanes either with the S&S coupler
    system or
    > > otherwise?
    >
    > Other than Going to a Bike Saturday, this is about the best (only) 'bent choice. And not a bad
    > one either.
    > >
    > > 2. I have some arthritis in my hip which doesn't normally bother me
    when
    > > riding an upright bike unless I get too low and far forward to reduce
    wind
    > > resistence. Then the angle of my back to my upper leg gets too acute
    and it
    > > bothers my hip. I would guess that riding a recumbent would be a
    non-issue
    > > hip-pain wise, but I'm not that familiar with the typical recumbent
    stroke.
    > > If it was necessary for my upper leg to come fairly close to my chest at
    the
    > > top of the stroke I might have some problems. I know that I should do
    some
    > > test rides to see what is the most comfortable for me, and I will when
    the
    > > weather improves around here, but I was just wondering whether anyone
    was
    > > familiar with hip joint related issues and particular types of
    recumbents to
    > > avoid. (e.g. it may be better for me to have more of a reclining
    position
    > > than to be very upright...or perhaps I should avoid the models which
    have
    > > the pedals higher than the seat.)
    >
    > I can not say what effect the Lightning seat would have on your arthritis. The Lightning seat
    > limits the rider to a closed position not too unlike that of an upright in a full tuck position.
    > It is a lot more comfortable than riding on a DF with your neck in a crimp. Other SWB 'bent with
    > high BB allow for a more reclined seat position So, I would not rule those out if the Lightning
    > does not work.
    >
    > > 3. For loaded touring, what do various member of the group think about racks & panniers vs.
    > > using a B.O.B. trailer with a recumbent?
    > >
    > My preference is Panniers Under the seat and on a rack in back. I've heard too many negative
    > reports on B.O.B. trailers to invest in one. I have a friend that has oe on a P-38 and he will use
    > in to haul groceries but not tour. We've toured together in Slovakia and Hungary in 2000.
    >
    > > 4. What do people think about the Lightning P38 Voyager as a candidate
    for
    > > my first recumbent, given what I have said above?
    >
    > Some people take to them right away, others need to warm up to them. I got mine after a year on a
    > LWB RANS Stratus. I took the Stratus to Vienna for the Slovakia trip. I needed to warm up to the
    > Lightning. It took me about a year and a half after I got the Voyager before I felt as
    > comfortable with it as I did the Stratus. I now have in addition to the Voyager a Bacchetta Giro
    > There was not transition form the Voyager to the Giro. I like both bikes equally well. The
    > Voyager will remain my travel bike. I'd like the Voyager better if the seat reclined and were as
    > comfortable as the Giro.
    >
    > > By the way, I am 50 years old, 6'3" and 245 pounds and other than the
    hip
    > > issue I am in pretty good shape with very strong legs.
    >
    > Here are some of my photos that you might find helpful.
    >
    > http://www.clee.org/Cycling/voyager_packing/
    >
    > http://www.clee.org/Czech_Tour/default.cfm
    >
    > I think you need to ride the P-38 and several other bikes before making a $5000 commitment on your
    > first recumbent.
    >
    > The Voyager is an excellent choice (post 9-11) if flying is in your touring plans.
    >
    > I would be happy to answer specific touring/Voyager questions either here or via e-mail.
    >
    > --
    > Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  16. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Cletus: Thanks for your very comprehensive reply. I checked out your website...some cool stuff
    > there. Your packing list list will definitely come in handy.

    Consider it a Public Service ;-)

    > In fact, I came across something about the Lightning P38 in this regard that makes me think twice
    > about whether it will suit me & my load. The website explains that the XL frame, which has a
    > maximum carrying capacity of 250 pounds does not fit in the S&S hard shell case. It further
    > explains that in such a situation the thing to do is to order the large frame and then use an XL
    > bottom bracket extender. However, since the load capacity of the Large frame is only 220 it seems
    > that such a solution wouldn't work for me since I'd have up to 300 pound including gear.

    The 250 lb. limit is rider weight only (rechecked the web site). I have a Medium and the rider
    weighht limit is listed at 200lb. I came close to that when I got the Voyager. I routinely carry 40#
    of touring gear and up to another 12# of water on the Voyager.
    >
    > "Cletus D. Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > > I am considering purchasing my first recumbent. I currently have two upright bike and I rode
    > > > 2600 miles on them last year, including my first
    > two
    > > > centuries. The primary thing I want in my next bike is that it be very comfortable for long
    > > > distance, loaded touring. Portability is also a consideration.
    > > >
    > > > So far I have only identified the Lighting P-38 Voyager as a high
    > quality
    > > > recumbent which has the S&S coupling option. But does it really cost
    > about
    > > > $1200 for this option...or is that just "suggested retail."?
    > >
    > > This is very close to actual. I spec'd my Voyager through LCD and ordered through my LBS. My LBS
    > > gave me some overall discount, but You can best figure the $1200 is close to what LCD probably
    > > pays for S&S to fit the coupling on the bike and the cost of the Suitcase to fit the bike.
    > > >
    > > > My other questions are:
    > > >

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  17. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    How often will you fly? I don't see the point of a BOB trailer if you trying to avoid airline
    charges. To get a BOB and a bike on as regular baggage would be very difficult, if not impossible.

    I wouldn't rule out something custom. I am surprised there aren't more custom solutions to this
    problem. I think an easily removable fork would make a some SWB bikes easy to ship. Consider a Rans
    Rocket, for example. If you could pull the fork, I think the frame would fit in golf bag case. You
    could pack other stuff around the frame. Wheels and seat could go into a duffle, along with other
    stuff; pannier racks and such. PITA, but not necessarily more than what it would take to break down
    the Lightning.

    I could imagine a kind of double crown fork. One crown is attached to the steerer and stays with the
    bike. The other crown holds the fork blades together. The blades extend above this crown enough to
    slide into openings on the upper crown so they can be clamped in.

    There used to be forks that had the blades clamped into the crown. This is a modification of
    that idea.

    For all I know, it might not be that hard to just pull the standard fork.

    I _think_ a Rocket would work for you, but you would need to check. You would definitely need
    underseat panniers. Ths smaller wheels are easier to pack, and in an emergency, this size is
    available pretty much around the world. Same size wheels means only one tube size to worry about.
    Fully assembled, a Rocket is pretty compact, so ti is not that difficult to trasport by car. Here is
    some info about an unmodified touring Rocket:

    http://www.phred.org/~alex/bikes/rocket.html

    If you needed something XL, like an XL V-Rex, this scenario _might_ still work. The bigger back
    wheel might be a bit of a problem. The thing is, I have never seen a gate agent use a tape measure.
    If something looks like a suitcase, golf bag, or other standard luggage, and is _close_ in size, it
    seems to me they mostly are concerned about weight.

    John Riley

    Ken Huizenga wrote:
    >
    > I am considering purchasing my first recumbent. I currently have two upright bike and I rode 2600
    > miles on them last year, including my first two centuries. The primary thing I want in my next
    > bike is that it be very comfortable for long distance, loaded touring. Portability is also a
    > consideration.
    >
    > So far I have only identified the Lighting P-38 Voyager as a high quality recumbent which has the
    > S&S coupling option. But does it really cost about $1200 for this option...or is that just
    > "suggested retail."?
    >
    > My other questions are:
    >
    > 1. Are there some other models I should consider which have good portability for traveling on
    > airplanes either with the S&S coupler system or otherwise?
    [...]
    > 3. For loaded touring, what do various member of the group think about racks & panniers vs. using
    > a B.O.B. trailer with a recumbent?
    >
    > 4. What do people think about the Lightning P38 Voyager as a candidate for my first recumbent,
    > given what I have said above?
    >
    > By the way, I am 50 years old, 6'3" and 245 pounds and other than the hip issue I am in pretty
    > good shape with very strong legs.
    >
    > Ken Appleton, Wisconsin [email protected]
     
  18. On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 11:11:30 GMT, John Riley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >How often will you fly? I don't see the point of a BOB trailer if you trying to avoid airline
    >charges. To get a BOB and a bike on as regular baggage would be very difficult, if not impossible.

    A Bike Friday travel trailer would be ideal for this application. The trailer frame is designed to
    be portable. (The SatRDay recumbent and trailer both fit into a single airline-legal case.)

    Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
     
  19. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >I tend to change bents every 2 years and it would seem some here do it more often. To break even
    >you'd need to do 6 flights before selling your bent...but then again even a single flight to
    >another country with a bent in tow might be well worth it. Plus it would certainly increase the
    >resale value of any bent.

    Another factor might be transportability once you're there.

    Once I flew into Frankfurt with my diamond-frame MTB in a box. No problem with Lufthansa, but the
    relative that met me there had misunderstood about the size of the box and brought a car in which
    there was no hope of fitting it.... Net result: my wife continued on and I paced the halls of the
    airport for nine hours waiting for somebody to come back with a larger car.

    I got S&S couplings on the frame I'm building up for road/utility/multi-purpose use with that in
    mind. After hearing about the inspection situation, I think I'd probably just reverse the pedals and
    ship it fully-assembled unless the cost was really out of sight...but I'll be glad to have the
    couplings for times when the bike needs to be stuffed into the trunk of a car - or even split
    between several cars...
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  20. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Ken Kobayashi wrote:
    >
    > I don't see an S&S coupled bike on the Easy Racers homepage. Is it an option for the GRR and/or
    > TE? Do you know the price?...

    Easy Racers does build a folding version of the GRR. < http://www.easyracers.com/fold_rush.htm >

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
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