Sacked For Being A Christian

Discussion in 'Your Bloody Soap Box' started by Carrera, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. davidmc

    davidmc New Member

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    Two questions for U:
    Are U.N. Security Resolutions binding and therefore enforceable :confused:
    and if not:
    Why does the U.N. exist :confused:
    Feel free to reminisce/defend SH if you feel so inclined :rolleyes:
     


  2. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    Responses:
    1) Binding = "Yes". Enforceable = "By whose standards?" The same coalition that saw invasion as the only solution to enforcing UN Security Council Resolutions in the case of Iraq, apparently did not feel the same solution was applicable with Israel's long=term refusal to comply with UN Security Council Resolutions regarding its behaviour. Diff'ent strokes for diff'ent folks? Are you so sure that the continuing occupation is really about transgressions of UN Security Council Resolutions?
    2) The UN exists so that there is an acceptable means for the Nations of the World to place these issues on the table. It is not a policeman. What it doesn't do (eg engage in warfare) is just as important as what it does do (engage in peacekeeping / observation programmes, and a very large number of operations to improve the lot of the unspoken masses (eg Decade of Water programme which, through recognising how debilitating the task of carrying water supplies is for those who do not have ready access to such, is funding a large effort to make local supplies available to the masses, or the WHO's vaccination campaigns here in Africa, or UNHCR efforts to provide basic supplies and administrative assistance to refugees, or...). Unfortunately, these issues are not very newsworthy, so many people only get to see what they may describe as the toothless monster that is the UN. The UN was never meant to have teeth. It is (in my opinion) misguided to berate it for not doing a task for which it was never intended.
    I do not, and never have, defended Saddam Hussein. He is, in my eyes, a piece of shite. I have refugee friends who suffered under him in the 1980's, one of whom had his leg shattered during a frontline confrontation with the Iranians, where he, as an Assyrian, was served up as canon-fodder. At that time, the very same Nations that form the current coalition, held Saddam up to be wonderful voice of reason (property) in a troubled Middle-East. He was a piece of shite then, and he's a piece of shite now.
    Some questions for you, David:
    1)Was a full scale (2nd) invasion of Iraq the only way that he could be dealt with? Many Nations did not appear to feel that it was warranted, despite the lobbying that was done to raise support.
    2)With the collective intelligence available to the mightiest miltary forces of the World, could no-one see the power vacuum they were going to create by using full-scale invasion as the means of removing one (1) man? I'm just an ordinary World citizen, and I predicted it. Couldn't they see :rolleyes: , or didn't they care ;) ?

    Forgive me if I am (again) sceptical of the ethical basis of this invasion and occupation. I am not sceptical of the troops on the ground - I am sceptical of the political forces that put them there, and continue to keep them there. It's a little bit like a fireman finding business is slow, so engaging in a bit of fire-lighting - "Sure, charge me with arson, but you'll have to wait until I put out all these bloody fires..."

    Apologies to Carrera for hijacking his thread...
     
  3. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    "If it doesn't work then I say-let them stay in the 6th cen. a.d.& the rest of the civilized world will move onward's."

    Bear in mind, Iraq was possibly the cream of the Arab World a few short decades ago, David. I don't see Saddam as being any worse than Pinochet who has never even been tried for the disappearances and torture of countless Chileans some years ago.
    The thing is, Saddam's Iraq was, without doubt, far more stable than Iraq today. Women in Iraq could go to university. Christians were tolerated. The education of the people in Iraq was also pretty high and the economy not so far off standards in modern Greece.
    "Need I bring up the oil-for-food scandal and the complicity of certain elements within ALL countries concerned not to mention Kofi Annon's son war-profiteering in this regard :mad: War-profiteering is bad, right."
    Not many people like Kofi but I saw him on T.V. lately discussing Iraq. he pointed out Saddam did leave a lot to be desired but at least Iraqis had security to get education, work and earn money and not to fear Shia Death Squads.
    I think this proves you can't really interfere in these situations unless you know exactly what you're doing and Bush has goofed big time.



     
  4. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    I sometimes recall the film by H.G. Wells - The Time Machine. As I recall, a Victorian scientists travels into the future to find a totally passive, non aggressive population who have no will to act as normal human beings ought to do.
    At one point, a girl falls into the river while her companions continue to pluck pansies and roses e.t.c. :confused: The scientist is furious, rolls up his sleeves, jumps into the water and rescues the girl. He can't figure out what's wrong with people.
    This is how society seems to be going. It's little things that add up. For example, an 80 year old man being pushed out of Parliament for disagreeing with Jack Straw over the Iraq War. Blair pushing for I.D. cards and trials without jury while lying and manipulating the public into the belief we'll be protected against terrorism.
    What about the disappearances of terror suspects to external countries without first having the right to a defence or legal representation? How do you know they are guilty without a trial - that's the question.
    The people in this country appear to be sleepwalking into dictatorship and a Banana Republic order where we're simply a colony of the U.S.
    Need I point out America now has extradition rights for U.K. citizens including businessmen and, again, this has been allowed to pass by unchallenged.
    Could you imagine the French sitting by passively in such a case? That's what I'm driving at.

     
  5. bkaapcke

    bkaapcke New Member

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    She is ot being discriminated on account of her beliefs. She is being disciplined for publicly displaying symbols of that belief. It's two entirely diffrent things. Overt actions are not belief. Why can't you christians keep it to yourselves?
     
  6. davidmc

    davidmc New Member

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    Couldn't agree w/ you more. See my Sig, below ;)
     
  7. lyotard

    lyotard New Member

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    what about a swatstika?, or a flipping the bird ornament?, perhaps a marijuana leaf pendant?
     
  8. Rickyrab

    Rickyrab New Member

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    nah, she wasn't sacked for being Christian. She was just sacked for showing it off in public... and the airline probably should have bigger things to worry about.
     
  9. Japheth

    Japheth New Member

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    BA is not so much BA as BS, like the majority of all else British.
    United Kingdom... no, more like Uptight England....


    Jacob Vickery
     
  10. davidmc

    davidmc New Member

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    See below:

    "James Edward Oglethorpe (22 December 1696 – 30 June 1785) was an English general, a philanthropist, and a founder of the state of Georgia."

    He was born in London,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Oglethorpe

    I'm from Georgia & an historian in my spare time. Our sig's are somewhat different also ;)
     
  11. Japheth

    Japheth New Member

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    hey dmc,
    nice to see another georgian on the forums
    vickerys are from near london
    King Arthur was an English general who was double-crossed by his nephew.

    www.geh.org/fm/cameron/m197400870011.jpg


    Jacob Vickery
     
  12. davidmc

    davidmc New Member

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    Welcome as well. I lived on a now abandoned military air base in Brunswick. Do you still live there? Atlanta is one of the largest most accessable cities on the east coast, no?
     
  13. garyj

    garyj New Member

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    It is not human nature to keep things to ourselves. If this were not the case WE wouldn't be here on this forum ranting about the things we believe in. Freedom of expression is what allows us to rant.
     
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