Sad scene

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Richard Goodman, Feb 18, 2003.

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  1. Today on my route home through Islington's side streets, a road off to the side was blocked off with
    police tape and a police car parked across the intersection. The accident investigation team was
    there, taking pictures -a bmx bike lay on its side across the middle of the road and another bike
    was abandoned at the side. Undoubtedly a serious, very likely fatal, collision had taken place
    involving at least one of these cyclists and a passing motor vehicle.

    Quite often, passing that intersection on the way home, I've encountered a small group of teenagers
    larking about on their bikes. Usually I've thought of them as a bit of a nuisance, using the road as
    a playground, liable to turn in circles or swerve suddenly and unpredictably rather than cycling in
    any purposeful manner. Of course, even in the evening they have no lights and no reflective
    clothing. But, these are relatively quiet side streets. It saddens me now, though, to think it
    possible if not likely someone from this group was involved in this incident. In any event, some
    family must surely be grieving tonight, and I somehow doubt that group will be larking about in the
    road again in quite the same way anytime soon.

    Of course, larking about in the road is foolishness. Maybe whoever was involved in this wasn't
    actually larking about at the time. Whatever, it is a very great pity that in what should be quiet
    residential streets, kids simply can't be kids once they venture onto the road. My own home is in a
    20mph zone, with 'junction treatment' and speed bumps all the way down, it's narrower than the
    street where the accident happened - and probably busier - and still some drivers drive down it at
    reckless speeds. How sad it is that when (some) people get behind the wheel, they seem to leave
    behind all sense of care or concern for other human beings - particularly those without another
    fume-emitting tin box around them to protect them in the event of a collision. I just wonder what it
    will take to make them _want_ to drive in residential areas at a speed and in a manner that is
    appropriate for residential areas - that is considerate of the needs of children, cyclists, the
    elderly etc.?

    Rich
     
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  2. "Richard Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Of course, larking about in the road is foolishness. Maybe whoever was involved in this wasn't
    > actually larking about at the time. Whatever, it is a very great pity that in what should be quiet
    > residential streets, kids simply can't be kids once they venture onto the road.

    Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners all the time?

    In my day kids would go to each others houses and play space invaders/listen to records and stuff
    like that.
     
  3. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Adrian Boliston wrote:

    > Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners all the time?

    Why shouldn't they?
     
  4. John B

    John B Guest

    Richard wrote:

    > Adrian Boliston wrote:
    >
    > > Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners all the time?
    >
    > Why shouldn't they?

    No problem until other issues arise. At lowest level, many of these groups can be very intimidating.

    John B
     
  5. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Wed, 19 Feb 2003 09:28:08 -0000, Adrian Boliston scrawled: ) Why do kids these days feel the need
    to "hang out" on street corners all the time? ) ) In my day kids would go to each others houses and
    play space ) invaders/listen to records and stuff like that.

    Doubtless your social group did, and hence you didn't notice the kids that were hanging out on
    street corners back then. Just to take an example, when the mods had all those there coffee houses
    and juke-boxes to hang around, some of them still found time to stand on street corners picking
    fights with rockers. And look what happened to Pete Townshend.

    I used to think kids hung around on the streets much /less/ than they used to, because there are so
    few in central Oxford compared to students (although, gosh, they look like kids nowadays). Then my
    girlfriend moved above a row of shops, and there's a gang of (relatively harmless) 14-year-olds
    outside almost every night. So it just depends on where you live, and when.

    J-P
    --
    "When I grow up, I want to be an honest lawyer so things like that can't happen." -- Richard M.
    Nixon, Former U.S. President (while still young, on 'Teapot Dome' scandal)
     
  6. Sda

    Sda Guest

    "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners all
    the time?

    I don't think hanging around on street corners is the problem, it's more likely a lack of common
    sense combined with the urge to show how many one-wheel hops you can do in between 2 passing cars
    (or something like that).

    I grew up on the busy A6 through Leicester, and road sense and awareness was drilled into me at an
    extremely early age. Perhaps that is what is lacking these days?

    Steve ;)
     
  7. W K

    W K Guest

    "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Richard Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Of course, larking about in the road is foolishness. Maybe whoever was involved in this wasn't
    > > actually larking about at the time. Whatever,
    it is
    > > a very great pity that in what should be quiet residential streets, kids simply can't be kids
    > > once they venture onto the road.
    >
    > Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners all
    the time?
    >
    > In my day kids would go to each others houses and play space
    invaders/listen to
    > records and stuff like that.

    Sad geek kid. I too did the above, but I too was a sad geek kid.

    On occaisions we did used to hang about on street corner. Its nothing new. Perhaps kids are given
    more freedom to do what they like.
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, W K <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >"Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> "Richard Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >> > Of course, larking about in the road is foolishness. Maybe whoever was involved in this wasn't
    >> > actually larking about at the time. Whatever,
    >it is
    >> > a very great pity that in what should be quiet residential streets, kids simply can't be kids
    >> > once they venture onto the road.
    >>
    >> Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners all
    >the time?
    >>
    >> In my day kids would go to each others houses and play space
    >invaders/listen to
    >> records and stuff like that.
    >
    >Sad geek kid. I too did the above, but I too was a sad geek kid.
    >
    >On occaisions we did used to hang about on street corner. Its nothing new. Perhaps kids are given
    >more freedom to do what they like.
    >
    Forgive me, but wasn't Adrian's post tongue in cheek?
    --
    The Big Baguette
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Michael MacClancy
    <[email protected]> writes
    >>>>
    >>>> Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners all the time?
    >>>>
    >>>> In my day kids would go to each others houses and play space invaders/listen to records and
    >>>> stuff like that.
    >>>
    >>> Sad geek kid. I too did the above, but I too was a sad geek kid.
    >>>
    >>> On occaisions we did used to hang about on street corner. Its nothing new. Perhaps kids are
    >>> given more freedom to do what they like.
    >>>
    >> Forgive me, but wasn't Adrian's post tongue in cheek?
    >
    >I thought he must have been a sad geek kid, too. But, there again, I haven't yet managed to
    >penetrate what passes for humour round here ;-). I think people tend to read plain text for what it
    >is. Adrian didn't post a smiley so why should anyone not take him literally?

    Good God, man -- because one is British, of course
    --
    The Big Baguette
     
  10. The Big Baguette wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, W K <[email protected]> writes
    >>
    >> "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>> "Richard Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]...
    >>>
    >>>> Of course, larking about in the road is foolishness. Maybe whoever was involved in this wasn't
    >>>> actually larking about at the time. Whatever, it is a very great pity that in what should be
    >>>> quiet residential streets, kids simply can't be kids once they venture onto the road.
    >>>
    >>> Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners all the time?
    >>>
    >>> In my day kids would go to each others houses and play space invaders/listen to records and
    >>> stuff like that.
    >>
    >> Sad geek kid. I too did the above, but I too was a sad geek kid.
    >>
    >> On occaisions we did used to hang about on street corner. Its nothing new. Perhaps kids are given
    >> more freedom to do what they like.
    >>
    > Forgive me, but wasn't Adrian's post tongue in cheek?

    I thought he must have been a sad geek kid, too. But, there again, I haven't yet managed to
    penetrate what passes for humour round here ;-). I think people tend to read plain text for what it
    is. Adrian didn't post a smiley so why should anyone not take him literally?
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  11. The Big Baguette wrote:
    > Good God, man -- because one is British, of course

    Is one?
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, Michael MacClancy
    <[email protected]> writes
    >The Big Baguette wrote:
    >> Good God, man -- because one is British, of course
    >
    >Is one?
    >--
    >Michael MacClancy
    >
    >
    One certainly is. Possibly the only thing God and I have in common
    --
    The Big Baguette
     
  13. Richard

    Richard Guest

    The Big Baguette wrote:

    > >> Good God, man -- because one is British, of course
    > >
    > >Is one?

    > One certainly is. Possibly the only thing God and I have in common

    Excuse me, but God is a Yorkshireman, not just a Britain, and bats for England. (It's just a pity
    that the Devil sits on the board of selectors.)

    Now, to remain on topic, what would Jesus ride?

    R
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>, Richard <[email protected]> writes
    >The Big Baguette wrote:
    >
    >> >> Good God, man -- because one is British, of course
    >> >
    >> >Is one?
    >
    >> One certainly is. Possibly the only thing God and I have in common
    >
    >Excuse me, but God is a Yorkshireman, not just a Britain, and bats for England. (It's just a pity
    >that the Devil sits on the board of selectors.)
    >
    >Now, to remain on topic, what would Jesus ride?
    >
    I suppose something from Halfords would be the nearest thing to a two- wheeled donkey
    --
    The Big Baguette
     
  15. Marc

    Marc Guest

    Richard <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > One certainly is. Possibly the only thing God and I have in common
    >
    > Excuse me, but God is a Yorkshireman, not just a Britain,

    If god is a Yorkshireman what is he doing leaving his own wonderful country of Wales?
     
  16. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

  17. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Richard wrote:
    >
    > > Adrian Boliston wrote:
    > >
    > > > Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners
    all the time?
    > >
    > > Why shouldn't they?
    >
    > No problem until other issues arise. At lowest level, many of these groups
    can be very
    > intimidating.
    >
    Nowhere near as intimidating as cars.
     
  18. "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >
    > > Richard wrote:
    > >
    > > > Adrian Boliston wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners
    > all the time?
    > > >
    > > > Why shouldn't they?
    > >
    > > No problem until other issues arise. At lowest level, many of these
    groups
    > can be very
    > > intimidating.
    > >
    > Nowhere near as intimidating as cars.
    >

    Bollocks. Many of these groups maliciously go out of their way to intimidate others.

    Christ, some people will go out of their way to use -*anything* to whinge about <insert transport
    mode here> ....
     
  19. In news:[email protected], Richard <[email protected]> typed:
    > Adrian Boliston wrote:
    >
    >> Why do kids these days feel the need to "hang out" on street corners all the time?
    >
    > Why shouldn't they?

    when I were a lad me and my mates used to hang out on street corners as well; but if we *were*
    larking about in the road in a dangerous manner or frightening old grannies, soon enough you'd see a
    black bike appear and PC Stratton would either be wheeling or riding it.

    He'd warn us about this practice (more "friendly uncle" than "do that again and your nicked!") - and
    we'd end up being dispersed to somewhere with less traffic or a park (he made sure those of us on
    bikes *didn't* ride them on the pavement!).

    He seemed also to know *every* street corner where young scallies would hang out as well ;)

    Perhaps if there were more "friendly local bobbies" like him these sort of RTCs wouldn't happen.

    Unfortunately this is London, so I guess that even if there *was* a friendly local bobby they are
    probably dealing with stuff like investigating why someone was slumped in the street with gunshot
    wounds, checking out that half-derelict flat which is being used a a crackhouse, or rushing to the
    house next door where the couple slap each other about like Punch and Judy, so the next generations'
    road safety doesn't get a look in :(

    Alex
     
  20. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Nathaniel Porter wrote:

    >>> No problem until other issues arise. At lowest level, many of these groups can be very
    >>> intimidating.
    >>>
    >> Nowhere near as intimidating as cars.
    >>
    >
    > Bollocks. Many of these groups maliciously go out of their way to intimidate others.
    >
    > Christ, some people will go out of their way to use -*anything* to whinge about <insert transport
    > mode here> ....

    Bullbars, custom exhusts, extra lights in an urban area?

    What are they for?

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
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