Saddle advice for long rides

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Gerry Rucker, May 28, 2003.

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  1. Gerry Rucker

    Gerry Rucker Guest

    I am an older male and do a good deal of longer distance riding. I've tried a number of different
    saddles and most are good for an hour or two. But when going past these limits the comfort level
    drops off quickly. I have been able to try several saddles, thanks to my LBS and all feel good
    for shorter periods. Of these saddles which in your opinion would be best for the long rides?
    Selle Italia Flite Trans Am, Terry Fly, Selle Italia Flite or Selle San Marco Aspide. All are
    Titanium rails.

    Gerry
     
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  2. Ronald

    Ronald Guest

    I would try a basic Selle SanMarco Rolls, cheap and very comfortable on longer rides for
    most behinds.

    "Gerry Rucker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am an older male and do a good deal of longer distance riding. I've
    tried
    > a number of different saddles and most are good for an hour or two. But when going past these
    > limits the comfort level drops off quickly. I have been able to try several saddles, thanks to my
    > LBS and all feel good for shorter periods. Of these saddles which in your opinion would be best
    > for the long rides? Selle Italia Flite Trans Am, Terry Fly, Selle Italia
    Flite
    > or Selle San Marco Aspide. All are Titanium rails.
    >
    > Gerry
    >
     
  3. andy_welch

    andy_welch New Member

    Joined:
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    Saddles are very personal things. If they fit your behind then great. If not then pain is a certainty. I've got on OK with a Selle Italie Max Flite Trans Am but when I tried the regular (i.e. narrower non-max) variety it killed me after an hour or so.

    Of course a leather saddle (e.g. Brooks) will mould to fit your bottom, but these are heavy. If you are going to stick with thre lighter composite shell models then it will just be a matter of experimenting untill you find something that suits you I'm afraid.

    Cheers,

    Andy
     
  4. Jim Wilson

    Jim Wilson Guest

    I'm 57, with a wide butt. I road a Rolls for about 6 years and was almost always delighted. I've
    ridden a Ti railed Regal for the last 5 last and have always been comfortable on centuries and
    such. YMMV.

    Jim Wilson

    On Wed, 28 May 2003 14:09:53 GMT, "Gerry Rucker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am an older male and do a good deal of longer distance riding. I've tried a number of different
    >saddles and most are good for an hour or two. But when going past these limits the comfort level
    >drops off quickly. I have been able to try several saddles, thanks to my LBS and all feel good
    >for shorter periods. Of these saddles which in your opinion would be best for the long rides?
    >Selle Italia Flite Trans Am, Terry Fly, Selle Italia Flite or Selle San Marco Aspide. All are
    >Titanium rails.
    >
    >Gerry
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Gerry Rucker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am an older male and do a good deal of longer distance riding. I've tried a number of different
    > saddles and most are good for an hour or two. But when going past these limits the comfort level
    > drops off quickly. I have been able to try several saddles, thanks to my LBS and all feel good
    > for shorter periods. Of these saddles which in your opinion would be best for the long rides?
    > Selle Italia Flite Trans Am, Terry Fly, Selle Italia Flite or Selle San Marco Aspide. All are
    > Titanium rails.

    There are so many variables that it is really a trial & error thing. What works for shorter rides
    often doesn't for longer. It's like asking what shoes would be comfortable to walk 10 miles in. I'm
    not a fan of Ti saddle rails, expensive and trouble-prone.
     
  6. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    Gerry Rucker wrote:
    > Of these saddles which in your opinion would be best for the long rides? Selle Italia Flite Trans
    > Am, Terry Fly, Selle Italia Flite or Selle San Marco Aspide. All are Titanium rails.

    Your mileage WILL vary. Saddles seem to be one of those things you have to try for yourself. I
    recommend trying a fairly wide variety of shapes to see which sort seems to suit you, then try
    saddles of similar shape to "dial it in".

    I remember in the 80's when the dominant nylon saddle brands were Sella Italia (Concor) and Selle
    San Marco (Turbo) - a friend said "It seems people either have a Turbo butt or a Concor butt." I
    couldn't stand Concors, others swore by them.

    One piece of specific advice: The Terry Fly and the Terry Liberator Ti Race fit very differently. If
    one doesn't work for you, you might try the other. I hated the former, love the latter. Ugly but
    comfortable.

    Good luck,
    --
    Mark Janeba remove antispam phrase in address to reply
     
  7. On Wed, 28 May 2003 10:09:53 -0400, Gerry Rucker wrote:

    > I am an older male and do a good deal of longer distance riding. I've tried a number of different
    > saddles and most are good for an hour or two. But when going past these limits the comfort level
    > drops off quickly. I have been able to try several saddles, thanks to my LBS and all feel good
    > for shorter periods. Of these saddles which in your opinion would be best for the long rides?
    > Selle Italia Flite Trans Am, Terry Fly, Selle Italia Flite or Selle San Marco Aspide. All are
    > Titanium rails.
    >

    Brooks B.17 works for me even for 8 hrs in saddle followed next day by another 8
     
  8. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    "Gerry Rucker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am an older male and do a good deal of longer distance riding. I've
    tried
    > a number of different saddles and most are good for an hour or two.
    But
    > when going past these limits the comfort level drops off quickly. I
    have
    > been able to try several saddles, thanks to my LBS and all feel good
    for
    > shorter periods. Of these saddles which in your opinion would be best
    for
    > the long rides? Selle Italia Flite Trans Am, Terry Fly, Selle Italia
    Flite
    > or Selle San Marco Aspide. All are Titanium rails.

    Whichever is most comfortable to you. Titanium rails aren't going to make any difference, unless
    they break and you get a seatpost up your ass. I would discourage you from using a cut-out saddle
    like the Terry because it may have a cookie-cutter effect on your scrotum. Try the Terry if the
    normal-design saddles do not work. Not to be glib, but also experiment with your shorts. As for my
    personal preference, an old Turbo. Simple, cheap and very comfortable for long rides. Although I
    also still ride an old Cinelli and an Ideal 2002 left over from the '70s, the Turbo, IMO, was all
    that I ever needed. The Terry, BG and other wonder-saddles turned out to be a waste of money. --
    Jay Beattie.
     
  9. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >Of these saddles which in your opinion would be best for the long rides? Selle Italia Flite Trans
    >Am, Terry Fly, Selle Italia Flite or Selle San Marco Aspide. All are Titanium rails.

    There's probably a huge trial-and-error component in saddle fit for anybody...but one thing you
    *can* deal with beforehand is ichial tuberosity spacing.

    How broad you butt is is irrelevant.

    What matters is how close or far apart those two sit bones are. Knowing that, you can check the
    usable width of a saddle and either eliminate it or put it on the list of ones to try.

    I'm in the same boat. Got a couple of Brooks B-17's that are great for anything up to a couple of
    hours, but 3-4 hours on one and I'm feeling it the next day. My sit bones are 4.5" apart, which puts
    them sort of half-on and half-off. If I could find something like a B-17 that's 3/4 of an inch wider
    I think I'd be in hog heaven.
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  10. Zeen

    Zeen Guest

    I agree it's trial and error but you could spend a fortune trying all the different saddles. I have
    been curious about the cutout saddles. They seem to be logical in their approach but I am also
    concerned about the damage that can be done by the ridges surrounding the cutout. I recently bought
    the new Forte Pro SL sold at Performance. It is a lightweight saddle (210gr.) with the cutout in the
    shell in the bottom but has padding above the cutout so there is no ridge. On the surface all you
    see is a depression in the leather. Check it out. I haven't tried it yet though. Waiting for some
    decent weather here in Philly.
     
  11. On Wed, 28 May 2003 14:09:53 +0000, Gerry Rucker wrote:

    > I am an older male and do a good deal of longer distance riding. I've tried a number of different
    > saddles and most are good for an hour or two. But when going past these limits the comfort level
    > drops off quickly. I have been able to try several saddles, thanks to my LBS and all feel good
    > for shorter periods. Of these saddles which in your opinion would be best for the long rides?
    > Selle Italia Flite Trans Am, Terry Fly, Selle Italia Flite or Selle San Marco Aspide. All are
    > Titanium rails.

    As mentioned by others, this is very individual. Before you blow a lot of money on a saddle, make
    sure your saddle height and angle are correct. Get fit by someone who has a clue.

    I love the Terry Fly. As mentioned, the Race is different, as is the Dragonfly. I prefer the
    original. It is fairly soft, but still comfortable on long rides due to the cut-out which prevents
    pressure in the wrong places. But your experience may be much different from mine.

    BTW, as far as I can determine the rail material is totally irrelevant. Sure, ti is a bit lighter,
    but don't expect that to affect comfort.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not _`\(,_ | certain, and as
    far as they are certain, they do not refer to (_)/ (_) | reality. -- Albert Einstein
     
  12. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Zeen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I agree it's trial and error but you could spend a fortune trying all the different saddles. I
    > have been curious about the cutout saddles. They
    seem
    > to be logical in their approach but I am also concerned about the damage that can be done by the
    > ridges surrounding the cutout. I recently bought the new Forte Pro SL sold at Performance. It is a
    > lightweight saddle (210gr.) with the cutout in the shell in the bottom but has padding above the
    > cutout so there is no ridge. On the surface all you see is a
    depression
    > in the leather. Check it out. I haven't tried it yet though. Waiting for some decent
    > weather here in

    AFAIK every shop I am acquainted with which sells top quality bicycles allows saddle exchange on a
    regular basis. Usually that's within a reasonable time like a month and without undue hassle - show
    your receipt and swap - as long as the saddle is saleable as new (and, barring catatstrophes, they
    usually are). And I am speaking about a couple of dozen stores scattered across the country and one
    store in Japan.

    Is that really an unusual policy out there? Comments? Anecdotes?

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  13. Mike Krueger

    Mike Krueger Guest

    << I have been curious about the cutout saddles. They seem to be logical in their approach but I am
    also concerned about the damage that can be done by the ridges surrounding the cutout. >>

    Good point. I tried a Selle Italia Max Flite Trans Am. Even with a thick chamois in my shorts, my
    perineum was squeezed down into the large cutout, and the ridges on either side cut into my crotch
    so badly that I had painful welts there after one short ride. Definitely the most uncomfortable
    saddle I have ever tried. Youd don't see many pros riding these goofy saddles, and they are on their
    bikes for 6 hrs a day. Choose a saddle with a smooth top and firm padding. If you adjust the height
    and angle correctly, you can ride with your weight back on your sit-bones, and little pressure on
    your crotch when you slide forward.
     
  14. grucker-<< But when going past these limits the comfort level drops off quickly. I have been able to
    try several saddles,

    Suggest you get a good bike fit. Saddle comfort is mostly about bike fit, not saddle design.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  15. Rick Warner

    Rick Warner Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Wed, 28 May 2003 14:09:53 +0000, Gerry Rucker wrote:

    > BTW, as far as I can determine the rail material is totally irrelevant. Sure, ti is a bit lighter,
    > but don't expect that to affect comfort.

    Except that sometimes there are associated differences that do affect comfort, at least for me. The
    Terry Fly with CrMo rails has a vinyl cover, the one with Ti rails has a real leather cover. I find
    the leather more comfortable than the vinyl, hence I choose the Ti rail model.

    - rick warner
     
  16. "Jay Beattie" <[email protected]> writes:

    >"Gerry Rucker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...

    >> I am an older male and do a good deal of longer distance riding. I've tried a number of different
    >> saddles and most are good for an hour or two. But when going past these limits the comfort level
    >drops off quickly. Which of these saddles to try ?

    Off the subject, but you may want to borrow a brooks pro pre-softened. There's a reason why the
    company has been in business for more than 140 years. If you really are a lightweight nut, then get
    a brooks titanium swift (be prepared to spend $140 for it, though.) yeah, its 340g, heavier than
    some, but it's also a saddle that will outlast your own bum ... :) :)

    http://www.permaco.com/ - persons majestic, importers of brooks saddles.

    - Don Gillies San Diego, CA
     
  17. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >I agree it's trial and error but you could spend a fortune trying all the different saddles. I have
    >been curious about the cutout saddles. They seem to be logical in their approach but I am also
    >concerned about the damage that can be done by the ridges surrounding the cutout.

    I think "cookie cutter effect" as coined in a previous post is apt.

    Somebody else talked about a "pressure ring".

    I bought something called a "Spongy Wonder"....split seat, no horn, not particularly spongy - but
    the split effect has an effect all it's own. The three (widely-spaced) times I rode the thing, my
    butt bled for about three days. It's now hanging in my garage as one more bad example...
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  18. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >Suggest you get a good bike fit. Saddle comfort is mostly about bike fit, not saddle design.

    I was going to spew "Yeah, for those that have normal butts..."...but now I realize that I went
    though quite a long period when I was blaming the saddles for the fact that I didn't have enough
    setback. My sit bones were resting on the hard rear edges of the saddles... Added two inches to the
    setback and things got much better.
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  19. (Pete Cresswell) <[email protected]> wrote:

    (...)
    > half-off. If I could find something like a B-17 that's 3/4 of an inch wider I think I'd be in
    > hog heaven.

    B17W ?

    > -----------------------
    > PeteCresswell

    --
    Antoine Gautier
     
  20. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >B17W ?

    That's the dream...They've already got a B17N.
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
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