saddle and gloves

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Jay, Mar 18, 2003.

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  1. Jay

    Jay Guest

    I have just purchased a new gel type saddle after 3 months of riding my new bike on a blokes saddle
    (ouch) and I am finding this one much more comfortable. No doubt I will get shouted at as I know
    many people don't recommend them due to trapping nerves etc, but I cycle a very short distance
    everyday and didn't fancy swapping my uncomfy saddle for one that looked virtually the same.

    That said, the gel saddle is forcing me to lean forward more then I usually do and I am putting more
    pressure on my hands and specifically the fleshy bit at the bottom of my thumbs. I have seen padded
    gloves with pads in this area, do people recommend these, is there a particular brand I should be
    after and why - or is the story so far making people shout at the computer as I should obviously not
    be using this saddle.

    Advice please, bear in mind I am a newbie and learning fast so be gentle!

    Jay
     
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  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    In a brief moment of lucidity Jay scribbled:

    > I have just purchased a new gel type saddle after 3 months of riding my new bike on a blokes
    > saddle (ouch) and I am finding this one much more comfortable. No doubt I will get shouted at
    > as I know many people don't recommend them due to trapping nerves etc, but I cycle a very
    > short distance everyday and didn't fancy swapping my uncomfy saddle for one that looked
    > virtually the same.
    >
    > That said, the gel saddle is forcing me to lean forward more then I usually do and I am putting
    > more pressure on my hands and specifically the fleshy bit at the bottom of my thumbs. I have seen
    > padded gloves with pads in this area, do people recommend these, is there a particular brand I
    > should be after and why - or is the story so far making people shout at the computer as I should
    > obviously not be using this saddle.
    >
    > Advice please, bear in mind I am a newbie and learning fast so be gentle!
    >
    > Jay

    Have you tried altering the angle of the new saddle .. lift the nose up a tad maybe.

    I found padded gloves to be as much a pain as the problem they tried to solve .. the pads always
    seem just a smidgeon smaller, or not quite in the right place for me .. ;)

    --

    My house is FOR SALE ... http://tinyurl.com/69r0
     
  3. Ian Walker

    Ian Walker Guest

    On Tue, 18 Mar 2003 15:58:59 -0000, Jay <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have just purchased a new gel type saddle after 3 months of riding my new bike on a blokes
    > saddle (ouch) and I am finding this one much more comfortable. No doubt I will get shouted at
    > as I know many people don't recommend them due to trapping nerves etc, but I cycle a very
    > short distance everyday and didn't fancy swapping my uncomfy saddle for one that looked
    > virtually the same.
    >
    > That said, the gel saddle is forcing me to lean forward more then I usually do and I am putting
    > more pressure on my hands and specifically the fleshy bit at the bottom of my thumbs. I have seen
    > padded gloves with pads in this area, do people recommend these, is there a particular brand I
    > should be after and why - or is the story so far making people shout at the computer as I should
    > obviously not be using this saddle.
    >
    > Advice please, bear in mind I am a newbie and learning fast so be gentle!
    >

    You should definitely try fiddling with your bike's set-up to get comfortable; loads of introductory
    books on cycling (and things like Haynes Bike Book) cover how to set up your position.

    If you decide you still want mitts, I've tried loads and love Trek's gel padded ones. I've tried
    these on very long day rides and tours and they're by far the best I've tried.

    Ian

    --
    Ian Walker Remove the yummy paste in my address to reply. Homepage: http://www.drianwalker.com
     
  4. Jay

    Jay Guest

    > Have you tried altering the angle of the new saddle .. lift the nose up a tad maybe.
    >
    > I found padded gloves to be as much a pain as the problem they tried to solve .. the pads always
    > seem just a smidgeon smaller, or not quite in the right place for me .. ;)
    >
    Hi Paul - the saddle fits to the post via a 'thingy' on the post which clips round two bars attached
    to the bottom of the saddle, I have no idea if this is standard or not, there doesn't seem to be a
    way of tilting it, unless I have missed it completely, I was changing the saddle in twilight and
    have not had chance to look in daylight yet....

    Jay
     
  5. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    In a brief moment of lucidity Jay scribbled:

    >> Have you tried altering the angle of the new saddle .. lift the nose up a tad maybe.
    >>
    >> I found padded gloves to be as much a pain as the problem they tried to solve .. the pads always
    >> seem just a smidgeon smaller, or not quite in the right place for me .. ;)
    >>
    > Hi Paul - the saddle fits to the post via a 'thingy' on the post which clips round two bars
    > attached to the bottom of the saddle, I have no idea if this is standard or not, there doesn't
    > seem to be a way of tilting it, unless I have missed it completely, I was changing the saddle in
    > twilight and have not had chance to look in daylight yet....
    >
    > Jay

    Heheheh, nice to see a real technical description .. ;)

    Heheheh .. most, if not all, saddles have a method of both sliding the saddle fore and aft, and
    raising and lowering the nose. I reckon you just need to look under the saddle for the allen key or
    bolt to slacken, move the saddle, and tighten the thing again .. ) There may also be an adjuster
    allen key on the seat post .. ;)

    --

    My house is FOR SALE ... http://tinyurl.com/69r0
     
  6. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Jay" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Hi Paul - the saddle fits to the post via a 'thingy' on the post which
    clips
    > round two bars attached to the bottom of the saddle, I have no idea if
    this
    > is standard or not, there doesn't seem to be a way of tilting it, unless I have missed it
    > completely, I was changing the saddle in twilight and have not had chance to look in
    > daylight yet....

    There should be a nut or allen screw on the 'thingy'. Loosen this a bit and you should be able to
    move the saddle nose up & down and the saddle back & forward.

    Loosen it a bit too much and you will be scrabbling on the floor for the various bits.

    T
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Jay wrote:
    > ..........I am putting more pressure on my hands and specifically the fleshy bit at the bottom of
    > my thumbs. I have seen padded gloves with pads in this area, do people recommend these, is there a
    > particular brand I should be after and why

    Ozzo gel mitts have more padding than most.
    - from http://www.mwdyason.ltd.uk/ (sized a bit large). Can be worn over thin glover liners
    and/or under other gloves as well.

    But I agree that it's well worth trying all the various saddle adjustments first. ...Then of course
    there's the handlebar adjustments :)

    ~PB
     
  8. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Jay
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >That said, the gel saddle is forcing me to lean forward more then I usually do and I am putting
    >more pressure on my hands and specifically the fleshy bit at the bottom of my thumbs. I have seen
    >padded gloves with pads in this area, do people recommend these, is there a particular brand I
    >should be after and why

    I use mitts most o the time (unless I'm wearing full gloves). I find it more comfortable for my
    hands and if you have a little tumble it gives the hands some protection.

    As for brands, well I find that whenever I go to buy a new pair they've changed and I have to hunt
    for another type. I don't like thick padding but do like it in the right places. Gel is fine as long
    as not to thick. thin foam padding in cheap gloves is a waste of time. I prefer neoprene padding if
    I can find gloves using that.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  9. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Ozzo gel mitts have more padding than most.
    > - from http://www.mwdyason.ltd.uk/ (sized a bit large). Can be worn over thin glover liners
    > and/or under other gloves as well.

    They look good. I like the description "terry towelling to act as a sweat wipe". Is it only me who
    only ever uses those bits for wiping a runny nose then? :eek:\

    Have fun!

    Graeme
     
  10. Jay

    Jay Guest

    > >Will go home, find tools and allen keys and examine 'thingy'!
    > >
    >
    > Jay
    >
    > Locate "thingy" and allen key to fit then go out for a trundle. Ride for a reasonjable distance
    > then adjust saddle position - insert allen key into "thingy" etc - then ride some more.
    >
    > If you can't find the "thingy", you should search for the "what-d'ya-ma-call-it".
    >
    > James
    >
    Went home examined 'thingy', decided you definitely couldn't change the angle and the only action
    was to turn seat post around, took 'thingy' apart to discover 'thingy' was resting on a curved base
    and I could move 'thingy' along curved base to alter the angle of the saddle! aha I thought, then
    spent 2 hours cycling up and down the road, allen key in hand, getting the angle comfy, not easy to
    do in the dark!

    Cycling in this morning felt like sitting on my sofa!

    thanks for all the help

    Jay
     
  11. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Jay" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Went home examined 'thingy', decided you definitely couldn't change the angle and the only action
    > was to turn seat post around, took 'thingy'
    apart
    > to discover 'thingy' was resting on a curved base and I could move
    'thingy'
    > along curved base to alter the angle of the saddle! aha I thought, then spent 2 hours cycling up
    > and down the road, allen key in hand, getting the angle comfy, not easy to do in the dark!
    >
    > Cycling in this morning felt like sitting on my sofa!
    >
    > thanks for all the help

    When you get home this evening tighten thingy up a bit more. I've always found that it needs to be
    fairly tight (about half a tame gorilla) otherwise it moves and the saddle gets all uncomfy again.

    Congratulations on your mechanical prowess.

    T
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, Graeme
    <[email protected]> writes
    >"Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Ozzo gel mitts have more padding than most.
    >> - from http://www.mwdyason.ltd.uk/ (sized a bit large). Can be worn over thin glover liners
    >> and/or under other gloves as well.
    >
    >They look good. I like the description "terry towelling to act as a sweat wipe". Is it only me who
    >only ever uses those bits for wiping a runny nose then? :eek:\
    >
    No, it certainly isn't only you. My right glove is disgusting.
    --
    The Big Baguette
     
  13. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Graeme <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > They look good. I like the description "terry towelling to act as a sweat wipe". Is it only me who
    > only ever uses those bits for wiping a runny nose then? :eek:\

    Terry towelling on a mitt cannot cope with the productivity of a cyclist's nose. You need to
    practise expelling the surplus onto the road or, even better, onto the door handle of a car parked
    in a cycle lane.

    --
    Dave...
     
  14. David Green

    David Green Guest

    "Jay" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > That said, the gel saddle is forcing me to lean forward more then I usually do and I am putting
    > more pressure on my hands and specifically the fleshy bit at the bottom of my thumbs. I have seen
    > padded gloves with pads in this area, do people recommend these, is there a particular brand I
    > should be after and why - or is the story so far making people shout at the computer as I should
    > obviously not be using this saddle.

    I assume you are using drop handlebars.

    Some practical advice:

    saddle angle - the top of the saddle should be horizontal. It is certainly not a good idea to tilt
    it nose-upwards.

    handlebar height - your hands should be roughly the same height as the nose of the saddle (after
    you've got that right, for your leg length), or possibly up to 1 inch lower. If you are getting a
    lot of weight on your hands, it might well be because the handlebars are too low: try raising them.
    (This is easy with a traditional stem, but usually impossible if you have a more fashionable
    'threadless headset'. If you have the later, consider replacing your stem with an 'adjustable angle'
    type, to get the necessary height for your hands.)

    Handlebar angle (drops) - Remember to ride with hands around the brake-lever hoods most of the time.
    Unfortunately, some new bikes come with the bars incorrectly rotated forward 15 degrees or so,
    making the

    the bike shop, and some people (incorrectly) believe that you ride drops with the hands on the lower
    parts, but you should ride with hands around the brake-lever hoods most of the time for comfort.
    Forward sloping bars will make your hands very uncomfortable, in the way you describe. The top of
    the dropped handlebars should be horizontal, leaving the lower parts pointing DOWN towards the rear
    axle (ie. a downward slope to the rear of about 30 degrees.)

    Let us know how you get on. I'm sure the saddle itself is not to blame.

    David Green Cambridge, UK
     
  15. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Dave Kahn wrote:
    > Graeme <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >> They look good. I like the description "terry towelling to act as a sweat wipe". Is it only me
    >> who only ever uses those bits for wiping a runny nose then? :eek:\
    >
    > Terry towelling on a mitt cannot cope with the productivity of a cyclist's nose. You need to
    > practise expelling the surplus onto the road or, even better, onto the door handle of a car parked
    > in a cycle lane.

    I had to wait for a train once an bought a copy of the sepo mag 'Bicycling'. It had and article on
    how to do that.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  16. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    David Green wrote:

    > Some practical advice:
    >
    > saddle angle - the top of the saddle should be horizontal.
    >
    > handlebar height - your hands should be roughly the same height as the nose of the saddle

    > Handlebar angle (drops) - Remember to ride with hands around the brake-lever hoods most of
    > the time.

    > The top of the dropped handlebars should be horizontal

    I don't like all these "shoulds". Some practical advice for beginners from me: Setup and ride your
    bike however YOU like, trying various different bar, lever and saddle positions to get more
    comfortable (making very small alterations at a time).

    ~PB
     
  17. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > I had to wait for a train once an bought a copy of the sepo mag 'Bicycling'. It had and article on
    > how to do that.

    One of my clubmates clears her nose spectacularly at 3 mile intervals more or less. I try to avoid
    getting on her wheel. :)

    --
    Dave...
     
  18. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Thu, 20 Mar 2003 07:12:54 -0000, "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    >I don't like all these "shoulds". Some practical advice for beginners from me: Setup and ride your
    >bike however YOU like, trying various different bar, lever and saddle positions to get more
    >comfortable (making very small alterations at a time).
    >

    Nevertheless, Pete, by obeying David's "shoulds" I did come up with the most comfortable hand
    position for hood, top and drop riding.

    OK, I didn't actually obey David's rules; I found them out for myself. I also fiddled around with
    the positions of the levers on the bars at the same time. Having no tape on the bars at the time
    naturally helped.

    James

    --
    A credit limit is NOT a target.
     
  19. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Wed, 19 Mar 2003 09:34:09 -0000, "Jay"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Went home examined 'thingy', decided you definitely couldn't change the angle and the only action
    >was to turn seat post around, took 'thingy' apart to discover 'thingy' was resting on a curved base
    >and I could move 'thingy' along curved base to alter the angle of the saddle! aha I thought, then
    >spent 2 hours cycling up and down the road, allen key in hand, getting the angle comfy, not easy to
    >do in the dark!
    >
    >Cycling in this morning felt like sitting on my sofa!
    >

    Jay

    Congrats with your use of the thingy. One point I forgot to mention is that, in general, if you move
    the saddle forwards, you'll have to increase the saddle's height a little (assuming you want to keep
    the same effective saddle height). It's easier than DIY femur-adjustment surgery, IMO.

    James

    --
    A credit limit is NOT a target.
     
  20. Jay

    Jay Guest

    > I assume you are using drop handlebars.
    >
    > Some practical advice:
    >
    > saddle angle - the top of the saddle should be horizontal. It is certainly not a good idea to tilt
    > it nose-upwards.
    >
    > handlebar height - your hands should be roughly the same height as the nose of the saddle (after
    > you've got that right, for your leg length), or possibly up to 1 inch lower. If you are getting a
    > lot of weight on your hands, it might well be because the handlebars are too low: try raising
    > them. (This is easy with a traditional stem, but usually impossible if you have a more fashionable
    > 'threadless headset'. If you have the later, consider replacing your stem with an 'adjustable
    > angle' type, to get the necessary height for your hands.)
    >
    > Handlebar angle (drops) - Remember to ride with hands around the brake-lever hoods most of the
    > time. Unfortunately, some new bikes come with the bars incorrectly rotated forward 15 degrees or
    > so, making the

    > the bike shop, and some people (incorrectly) believe that you ride drops with the hands on the
    > lower parts, but you should ride with hands around the brake-lever hoods most of the time for
    > comfort. Forward sloping bars will make your hands very uncomfortable, in the way you describe.
    > The top of the dropped handlebars should be horizontal, leaving the lower parts pointing DOWN
    > towards the rear axle (ie. a downward slope to the rear of about 30 degrees.)
    >
    Thanks David - actually I am on straight handle bars, but the seat was angled so steeply that I was
    steering and holding myself on the bike with my hands. I spent one journey constantly slipping off
    the seat, but now it seems fine. I spent about 2 hours cycling up and down the road getting the
    saddle right and actually not the bars are about the same height, maybe a little higher but since I
    am sure this is going to be quiet an ongoing process I might try it for a while and see how I get
    on, fortunately I don't cycle far to work so it I try a setting that doesn't suit me I can always
    put up with it until I get home which is mostly downhill anyway!

    cheers for the advice

    Jay
     
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