saddle angle question



findfix

New Member
Aug 10, 2003
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I need some help here people.

I have just picked up a new bike, it was fitted proffesionally and i dont doubt the blokes credentials however i have picked up an ITB injury.
The injury does not affect me on the bike only when i run.

The only thing different on the bike setup is my saddle position.
I am a pusher rather than a pedaler, i ride very few hills and find that my best saddle position is high and sloped forward quite a way.
My new one was setup completely level.

I realise that my old setup was probably not biomech correct but if it works for me is it ok, or should i try to learn to ride with a flatter angle on my saddle?

sorry that was so long.....
 

boudreaux

New Member
Oct 16, 2003
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Originally posted by findfix
I need some help here people.

I have just picked up a new bike, it was fitted proffesionally and i dont doubt the blokes credentials however i have picked up an ITB injury.
The injury does not affect me on the bike only when i run.

The only thing different on the bike setup is my saddle position.
I am a pusher rather than a pedaler, i ride very few hills and find that my best saddle position is high and sloped forward quite a way.
My new one was setup completely level.

I realise that my old setup was probably not biomech correct but if it works for me is it ok, or should i try to learn to ride with a flatter angle on my saddle?

sorry that was so long.....
I see saddles pointed at the ground,and up in the air.Mine are level,so what do I know? If it hurts, adjust it till it doesn't.
 

findfix

New Member
Aug 10, 2003
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Originally posted by boudreaux
I see saddles pointed at the ground,and up in the air.Mine are level,so what do I know? If it hurts, adjust it till it doesn't.


:D thanks for reply. It definately dont hurt i just seem to get better power down when its tilted forward.
 

Hitchy

New Member
Jan 26, 2004
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G'day,

the usual theories on roadbike set up suggest the saddle should be flat (except perhaps for T/T or tri set ups). i gather the reasoning is increased pressure on the 'nether regions' & on the hands & back. I'm sure there are plenty of biomechanical reasons as well. Having said that, comfort on your bike is as important as anything ,(if you ain't comfortable you won't ride it!), so unless you are a high level racer or something, I'd be tempted to do whatever works for you,

cheers,

Hitchy
 

skareb

New Member
Jan 17, 2004
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I think nobody can help you here as everyones preference are different, you should try to experiment with your saddle tilt angle begin with level, then point downwards by 1º at a time and try to ride for at least 3 hours then you'll feel the effect. after that do the opposite and point upwards. After many trial and error you'll finally settle down to something you like, FYI I prefer mine pointing upward 1º.

The saddle height to your stem height also plays an important factor, my saddle are about 2" about my stem height, I've also seen guys that have about 6" and thier saddle are mostly pointing downwards.
 

Postie

New Member
Sep 25, 2003
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Originally posted by findfix
I need some help here people.

I have just picked up a new bike, it was fitted proffesionally and i dont doubt the blokes credentials however i have picked up an ITB injury.
The injury does not affect me on the bike only when i run.

The only thing different on the bike setup is my saddle position.
I am a pusher rather than a pedaler, i ride very few hills and find that my best saddle position is high and sloped forward quite a way.
My new one was setup completely level.

I realise that my old setup was probably not biomech correct but if it works for me is it ok, or should i try to learn to ride with a flatter angle on my saddle?

sorry that was so long.....

I can relate to ITB issues. I too am a former runner. My thoughts are this...

1) It's possible it has nothing to do with your bike if you're feeling it while your running. Maybe it's your training or a new pair of running shoes? Maybe it's a coincidence that you're feeling it after buying your bike? Running is infamous from causing ITB issues.

2) When I've had issues with ITB on my bike, each and every time was a result of the seat being too high (I find even 3 mm too high can do it too me). Is it possible the seat height was altered or the crank length is longer?
 

findfix

New Member
Aug 10, 2003
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Thanks for all your replys.

I am pretty certain that my ITB was caused by a mixture of the bike fit and a lazy attitude towards warming down and streaching after training.
My physio has laid the law down on that one.

I was just wondering if all the stuff you read about angles and that was true.......

Ive gone from an conventional frame that was possibly to big for me to a compact Giant, set up for triathlons......

I get the general idea that its what suits that matters and seeing as it dont hurt and i go quicker when its down, I think it is going to stay pointing down, until it does give me a problem.

cheers

Tozz
 

guiness

New Member
Oct 29, 2004
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tozz,

lazy attitude? you? never!
find you everywhere...ha ha,love you,
your darling wife:p
(swimming,cycling... so i am your number three?never mind.forgot to tell you,i orderd a new sattle...not for your bike,for my horse:)
 

cachehiker

New Member
Sep 30, 2003
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findfix said:
Thanks for all your replys.

I am pretty certain that my ITB was caused by a mixture of the bike fit and a lazy attitude towards warming down and streaching after training.

Having my seat 5-10mm too high ruined the majority of my season. I bought a new bike, adjusted it identically to my old bike, and then installed a saddle with 5mm more padding and pedals with 5mm less stack height. My ITB got so inflamed at the end of an early season 85 miler, I had to stay off the bike for almost a month. It didn't start to feel better for another month after that.

The tilt of my saddle has always been zero until recently. Tilting it back about a degree took a wee bit of weight off my hands. Now they don't go numb at all, even after three or four hours. I think I was pushing back with my hands to keep an ideal position in the saddle. The epiphany came while fitting an old hybrid bike for my retired dad with a older, softer saddle I had around. A saddle I had always hated as it always had me sliding forward. I still hate it, but tilting it back a bit got rid of his numbness so I tried it on my own bike as well.
 

meb

New Member
Aug 21, 2003
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findfix said:
I need some help here people.

I have just picked up a new bike, it was fitted proffesionally and i dont doubt the blokes credentials however i have picked up an ITB injury.
The injury does not affect me on the bike only when i run.

The only thing different on the bike setup is my saddle position.
I am a pusher rather than a pedaler, i ride very few hills and find that my best saddle position is high and sloped forward quite a way.
My new one was setup completely level.

I realise that my old setup was probably not biomech correct but if it works for me is it ok, or should i try to learn to ride with a flatter angle on my saddle?

sorry that was so long.....

I try an slope the saddle forward slightly to transfer weight back off the prostrate.