Saddle Making Me Sore - New Saddles Anyone?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by jjn25, Sep 10, 2014.

  1. jjn25

    jjn25 New Member

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    Ok, I'm struggling with the age old issue of being sore in that perineum and associate areas after longer rides 2+ hours. Sit Bones ok.

    I've tried a number of saddles, and fitting changes (with my local bike shop), some success not much. Wondering if someone has tips they've used.

    I'm also going to look into additional new saddles out there as I'm thinking there's got to be a better shape than what's killing my parts..
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    There's no shortage of "novel" saddle designs, although on closer scrutiny they usually turn out to have been invented before.
    And while there is the rare high-mileage rider who use them, the traditional design still reigns supreme.
    Since I'm unwilling to consider an world-wide saddle conspiracy, I think it's because they work the best for the biggest number of people.

    One I have considered though is the Rido R2. Seems like a potentially useful balance between old and new.
     
  3. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Quote by jjn25:
    "I'm also going to look into additional new saddles out there..."


    You have your solution.

    Now go forth and seek ye the Kingdom of Comfort and Speed.

    Despite all the formulae, fit kits, weird designs, super-polymer padding, carbon fiber rails, etc. it still comes down to the Goldylocks solution: This one is just right!

    Other than offering the age old "Get up off your backside often (climbing, accelerating while up out of the saddle or just rising for the Hell of it)" my advice is the same as yours...keep trying until you find one that works. Then, when you do find heaven, buy five copies of it before the manufacturer decides to cease production of that model.
     
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  4. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    That has happened to me. Find a seat, wear it out and they stop production. Bastards!
     
  5. leroy1010

    leroy1010 New Member

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    Ever try carbon saddle ?
     
  6. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. IMO, most people EITHER do not set up their saddle, properly, OR they are sitting on their saddle improperly ...
    • MY impression is that most people straddle the nose rather than sitting on the rear of the saddle ... OTHERS may-or-will disagree ...
    AND, if they aren't straddling the nose, then they have often set up their saddle with the top of the saddle parallel to the ground. A partial "solution" is to ensure that the nose of the saddle is slightly lower than the rear of the saddle AND that you (the rider) are sitting all the BACK on the rear of the saddle. ANOTHER "solution" is to simply get off your bike & rest for a minute-or-two BEFORE you hit the "two hour" mark.
     
  7. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I agree with this, and to add to it a lot of people just go out and buy a saddle without ever knowing how wide their sit bones are and then sit on a saddle that's too wide or to narrow which is probably the case with the OP. You have two options to find the right size, either do it yourself by watching this video: http://www.artscyclery.com/learningcenter/measuresitbonewidth.html The cardboard method works or you can use a block of styrofoam. OR go to an LBS, they usually have a memory foam thing that you can sit on and do the same thing and they should do this for you for free.
     
  8. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    Another ingredient in the pot may be at your health care provider. Next check-up, ask your doctor why your duff hurts after a ride. Have your bike handy so he can inspect it (and you on it) if necessary. He may either find something of interest or tell you "don't go so far on a bicycle." (Right...) As mentioned, it could be the way it's set up. I like mine pointed about 7 degrees down and I probably have it a bit higher than optimal. (Try raising yours for a couple rides) My saddle also has a cutout down the middle of the back half so that the pressure is also on my hams and not on my tailbone. I'm also a clydesdale, so that dredded layer of fat (to many) may also help.
     
  9. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    I just figured out that I am gonna have to get a better saddle for one of my bikes. Why do they always seem to give you that hard plastic wedge with less than a quarter inch of filter foam with a new bike? That'll do me in every time!
     
  10. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Because it's cheaper than spec'ing a good saddle. The saddle is always the first thing to go when I (rarely) get a new bike.

    Over the years, I've found this is what works for me. If the saddle is level but my perineum still hurts, it's probably a couple millimeters too high. Being a bigger guy, I like a longer saddle that's not too narrow at the butt. My inner thighs need side skirts to prevent chafing. And generally, too much soft foam bottoms out where you don't want it to (under the pelvic bones) and mooshes up into the crevices where you don't want it, either. A softer piece of foam is almost never the solution. And saddles that are almost dead flat, like Fizik's Arione, are best set dead horizontal, while saddles with a bit of scoop, like Fizik's Alliante and San Marco's Concor, work better with the cantle a bit higher than the nose.

    For years I refused to even look at Selle Italia's Flite because it resembled the ass-hatchet that came on my Felt F5. Boy, was I wrong. Be prepared to be surprised.
     
  11. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Quote by lectraplayer:
    "Why do they always seem to give you that hard plastic wedge with less than a quarter inch of filter foam with a new bike?"

    Bicycles are 'package designed' and spec'd just like cars/trucks are...by bean counters.

    Profit is built into the sales model by procuring less expensive components where possible and in areas that will not negatively affect sales or appeal of the total model.

    Many buyers install their own favorite/preferred seat right off the sales floor. Gone in 60 seconds and very few riders mind tossing the OEM seat in the spare parts box. Everyone knows it's usually a $10-$20 item and no big deal.

    Tires are another cost saver.

    The same goes for wheels in most cases. Although they are less likely to be swapped out quickly, wheels are 'the' upgrade component and often upgraded right after those cheapo Schwalbe tires are worn out.

    Non-matching chains, lower end cassettes, off-brand brakes are also areas the manufacturers build some more profit into the equation.
     
  12. ABNPFDR

    ABNPFDR Member

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    If you are feeling pressure in the perineum then nose the saddle down a bit. Does not take much, maybe half a degree.

    Basically, saddles come in 2 shapes, curved and flat. For example, the Specialized Romin and Toupe, but pick your brand. The curved ones kind of spread out the pressure all around, the flat ones bias the support to the sit bone area. Saddle width is important. I highly recommend having your sit bones measured so you have an idea what saddle width works for you.

    Padding is misleading. You don't need a lot of it to be comfortable even over long distances, EVEN if you are not a twig that weighs 120 pounds soaking wet.

    Keep in mind, It can take time to adjust to a new saddle, especially if you have been riding with a less than ideal saddle. I would give any new saddle at least a month break in period. Also, correct saddle height is important. Saddles too low or two high can affect comfort.

    For most riders, flat saddles work best but curved work for many riders as well. If you are one of the few who don't I'd look into something different like a Cobb JOF or a Randee.
     
  13. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    I can deal with cheap wheels, brakes, drivetrain components, and even frames much better than a cheap seat (except at a baseball game.) Seat covers also have failed me miserably. I bet their sales would be up with better seats.
     
  14. jjn25

    jjn25 New Member

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  15. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Just one of many different designs that have come and gone and a few stay, but they all boil down to one thing...the person riding, not all butts are created equal and what may work for you may not work for someone else. If these "radical" designed saddles were all that great all the pros would be riding them, but they don't.
     
  16. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    After more than 100 years of trying to develop the perfect saddle, I don't think there is any magic bullet design. The article on Sheldon Brown's website covers the subject pretty well I think:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/saddles.html
     
  17. ambal

    ambal Active Member

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    That is without doubt, the best advise anyone could give in regard to getting a good seat.
     
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