saddle position

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Sam, Feb 19, 2003.

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  1. Sam

    Sam Guest

    Hi,

    reading in another post, someone mentioned keeping saddle and bars at the same height. Does this
    really make a difference ? if so, how ? I have been riding for yonks, and have always set mine at
    the same height, for no other reason `cept I was told to..

    thanks for replies. sam
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, sam <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >reading in another post, someone mentioned keeping saddle and bars at the same height. Does this
    >really make a difference ? if so, how ?

    You might find this useful reading:

    http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/html/bikes_framesize.html

    > I have been riding for yonks, and have always set mine at the same height, for no other reason
    > `cept I was told to..

    And you probably found it comfortable, which many people do.

    --Paul
     
  3. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "sam" <[email protected]> wrote in news:b30j6g$qh7$1$8300dec7 @news.demon.co.uk:
    > reading in another post, someone mentioned keeping saddle and bars at the same height. Does this
    > really make a difference ? if so, how ? I have been riding for yonks, and have always set mine at
    > the same height, for no other reason `cept I was told to..

    Depends alot on how hard you pedal. Tourists who generally spin easily and enjoy the scenery usually
    prefer a higher handlebar (and shorter stem) for a more upright riding position.

    Racers, who pedal alot harder, like a lower handlebar since it helps generate more power from your
    back to your legs. When you're pedalling hard, much of your weight is on your pedals, not your back
    or hands, so tush pain is not a problem.

    Ken
     
  4. >Zeke<

    >Zeke< Guest

    "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:plQ4a.32744$A%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, sam <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >reading in another post, someone mentioned keeping saddle and bars at the same height. Does this
    > >really make a difference ? if so, how ?
    >
    > You might find this useful reading:
    >
    > http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/html/bikes_framesize.html
    >

    I went with the Rivendell philosophy regarding frame size several years ago. I could not be happier.
    I am not a racer, but a long distance cyclist.
     
  5. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    sam wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > reading in another post, someone mentioned keeping saddle and bars at the same height. Does this
    > really make a difference ? if so, how ? I have been riding for yonks, and have always set mine at
    > the same height, for no other reason `cept I was told to..
    >
    > thanks for replies. sam

    Umm.... "I have been riding for yonks" ?? Sorry, I only speak english, not British. I don't know
    about seat height vs bar height being important. I'm only convinced that seat height and seat ANGLE
    (I go for dead level to start) matter re: the condition of my butt, prostate, and knees. Seems the
    saddle/bar height thing relates to what style of riding you are into. So... what is "yonks" ? Best
    regards, Bernie
     
  6. On Wed, 19 Feb 2003 14:02:53 -0500, Ken wrote:

    > Racers, who pedal alot harder, like a lower handlebar since it helps generate more power from your
    > back to your legs. When you're pedalling hard, much of your weight is on your pedals, not your
    > back or hands, so tush pain is not a problem.

    This is nonsense. The lower handlebar position keeps you out of the wind. It does not "generate
    more power". You do not transfer power from your back, which has little to give anyway, to your
    legs. (How?) I don't know how much of any rider's weight is on their back, but somehow I would
    think none...

    None of that made any sense.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Deserves death! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve _`\(,_ | death. And some that die
    deserve life. Can you give it to (_)/ (_) | them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in
    judgement. -- J. R. R. Tolkein
     
  7. Sam

    Sam Guest

    yonks = donky`s years

    when i first started riding to work, i got my first bike and it was set up at the same height, since
    then, I have always set seat and saddle the same. I never bothered to try any other positions, so i
    can`t say about `forearms becoming shorter` when the bars are lower.

    thanks anyway, it`s very interesting

    sam
     
  8. Bernie wrote:

    >Umm.... "I have been riding for yonks" ?? Sorry, I only speak english, not British. I don't know
    >about seat height vs bar height being important. I'm only convinced that seat height and seat ANGLE
    >(I go for dead level to start) matter re: the condition of my butt, prostate, and knees. Seems the
    >saddle/bar height thing relates to what style of riding you are into. So... what is "yonks" ? Best
    >regards, Bernie
    >
    >
    Yonks is a long time much the same as "I've been riding for donkeys" Donkeys...ears, rhymes
    with years.

    --
    Cheers Damian Harvey

    Just call me Clyde.
     
  9. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "sam" <[email protected]> wrote in news:b30j6g$qh7$1$8300dec7 @news.demon.co.uk:
    > > reading in another post, someone mentioned keeping saddle and bars at
    the
    > > same height. Does this really make a difference ? if so, how ? I have
    been
    > > riding for yonks, and have always set mine at the same height, for no
    other
    > > reason `cept I was told to..
    >
    > Depends alot on how hard you pedal. Tourists who generally spin easily
    and
    > enjoy the scenery usually prefer a higher handlebar (and shorter stem) for
    a
    > more upright riding position.
    >
    > Racers, who pedal alot harder, like a lower handlebar since it helps
    generate
    > more power from your back to your legs. When you're pedalling hard, much
    of
    > your weight is on your pedals, not your back or hands, so tush pain is not
    a
    > problem.
    >
    > Ken

    Actually, the lower your position, the more your glutes are brought into play. The higher you sit,
    the more your quads do the work. That's probably why (with aerodynamics) even the most fredly of
    riders instinctively hunches over to go fast.
     
  10. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    sam wrote:

    > yonks = donky`s years
    >
    > when i first started riding to work, i got my first bike and it was set up at the same height,
    > since then, I have always set seat and saddle the same. I never bothered to try any other
    > positions, so i can`t say about `forearms becoming shorter` when the bars are lower.
    >
    > thanks anyway, it`s very interesting
    >
    > sam

    Yes, language is interesting too. Will store "yonks" for future ref. Bernie
     
  11. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    Ken <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"sam" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> reading in another post, someone mentioned keeping saddle and bars at the same height. Does this
    >> really make a difference ? if so, how ? I have been riding for yonks, and have always set mine at
    >> the same height, for no other reason `cept I was told to..
    >
    >Depends alot on how hard you pedal. Tourists who generally spin easily and enjoy the scenery
    >usually prefer a higher handlebar (and shorter stem) for a more upright riding position.
    >
    >Racers, who pedal alot harder, like a lower handlebar since it helps generate more power from your
    >back to your legs. When you're pedalling hard, much of your weight is on your pedals, not your back
    >or hands, so tush pain is not a problem.

    OTOH, racers (and anyone who wants to go fast) don't want the bars that high because it means
    they'll have to pedal even harder to maintain a given speed. That is to say, they'll be more
    "comfortable" in a more aerodynamic position since they won't be working so hard to maintain their
    required pace.

    Plus, the harder you pedal, the less weight you put on your arms (effectively accomplishing the
    same thing as moving the bars up, except that you also put less weight on your butt by pedaling
    harder as well).

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  12. Sam

    Sam Guest

    hehehe aint it just...

    yonks=donkeys years = a long time

    at the risk of making this extremely OFF TOPIC, do you have any similar phrases ?

    sam
     
  13. N Crowley

    N Crowley Guest

    Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Ken <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >"sam" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > OTOH, racers (and anyone who wants to go fast) don't want the bars that high because it means
    > they'll have to pedal even harder to maintain a given speed. That is to say, they'll be more
    > "comfortable" in a more aerodynamic position since they won't be working so hard to maintain their
    > required pace.
    >
    > Plus, the harder you pedal, the less weight you put on your arms (effectively accomplishing the
    > same thing as moving the bars up, except that you also put less weight on your butt by pedaling
    > harder as well).
    >
    > Mark Hickey

    Anquetil had his bars higher than any other rider and he had an aero position as he cruised past his
    opponents in time trials. If your upper body weight is not supported by your arms, what is
    supporting it? When you try to pull on the bars when pedaling harder where is the resultant strain
    hinged? The answer is the lower back, now you know why medical experts are still seeking the cause
    and cure for cycling's lower back pain. It is not the saddle position that needs correcting, it is
    the pedaling, and then the saddle and bars will sort themselves out and back pain will be ended.
     
  14. Smokey

    Smokey Guest

    "sam" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > reading in another post, someone mentioned keeping saddle and bars at the same height. Does this
    > really make a difference ? if so, how ? I have been riding for yonks, and have always set mine at
    > the same height, for no other reason `cept I was told to..
    >
    > thanks for replies. sam

    i start the riding season with my seat and bars at the same height. after getting back in the
    groove, i can usually lower the bars an inch or two. on my mountain bike, the seat has to be at
    least an inch lower than the bars, or i have too many problems with front end lift on climbs. it's
    an individual preference thing. one poster on here stated that he runs his bars 8 inches lower than
    the seat. i admire his flexibility! smokey
     
  15. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >t's an individual preference thing. one poster on here stated that he runs his bars 8 inches lower
    >than the seat. i admire his flexibility! smokey

    Actually it is more likely due to height and arm length. Tall riders generally run with more drop as
    do riders with long arms.

    I normally ride with 4 to 6 inches of drop between the seat and bars, however I am far from
    flexible, I just have long arms and need somewhere to put them.

    Jon Isaacs
     
  16. Smokey

    Smokey Guest

    [email protected] (smokey) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "sam" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > reading in another post, someone mentioned keeping saddle and bars at the same height. Does this
    > > really make a difference ? if so, how ? I have been riding for yonks, and have always set mine
    > > at the same height, for no other reason `cept I was told to..
    > >
    > > thanks for replies. sam
    >
    > i start the riding season with my seat and bars at the same height. after getting back in the
    > groove, i can usually lower the bars an inch or two. on my mountain bike, the seat has to be at
    > least an inch lower than the bars, or i have too many problems with front end lift on climbs. it's
    > an individual preference thing. one poster on here stated that he runs his bars 8 inches lower
    > than the seat. i admire his flexibility! smokey

    correction; i run my mountain bike seat 2 inches HIGHER than my bars to keep the front end down.
     
  17. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    sam wrote:

    > hehehe aint it just...
    >
    > yonks=donkeys years = a long time
    >
    > at the risk of making this extremely OFF TOPIC, do you have any similar phrases ?
    >
    > sam

    A mixed breed dog is sometimes called a "Kinardly" because you can hardly tell what it is.
     
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