Saddle rustlers

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Luther Blissett, Jun 21, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Sometimes I see cyclists remove their saddles when locking up their bikes. I don't know of anybody
    who has had their saddle stolen, and was wondering how often it happens. Has anybody any first-hand
    experience of saddle theft?
     
    Tags:


  2. Dorre

    Dorre Guest

    Luther Blissett <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Sometimes I see cyclists remove their saddles when locking up their bikes. I don't know of anybody
    : who has had their saddle stolen, and was wondering how often it happens. Has anybody any
    : first-hand experience of saddle theft?

    I had wheel, chain and saddle stolen many years ago from a bike parked at the University of
    Edinburgh. There was a bike co-operative workshop in Edinburgh at the time, so I built a
    replacement wheel from a spare hub, rim and bunch of new spokes.

    There haven't been any similar thefts from the area where I currently leave my bike, so I don't
    remove or lock the saddle.

    I imagine there are still some areas where bits are likely to vanish of parked bikes. If more
    than one or two people unsrew bits from leaving their bikes in the same area as you do, it might
    be wise to ask them, or take precautions yourself!

    Dorre
     
  3. troyq

    troyq New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2003
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Three or four years ago I had my bike (the frame) locked up outside of work... it was a small 2 storey office complex in Melbourne. Anyway, sure enough my seat and seatpost were taken during the day... I was just lucky that both the wheels didnt go as well as I only had the frame attached with the lock.

    Quick-release seatposts are good for mtb'iking, not so good for commuting.

    Now wherever I go I use a cable lock for the wheels and seat and a u-lock to attach the frame.
     
  4. > Three or four years ago I had my bike (the frame) locked up outside of work... it was a small 2
    > storey office complex in Melbourne. Anyway, sure enough my seat and seatpost were taken during the
    > day... I was just lucky that both the wheels didnt go as well as I only had the frame attached
    > with the lock.
    >
    > Quick-release seatposts are good for mtb'iking, not so good for commuting.
    >
    > Now wherever I go I use a cable lock for the wheels and seat and a u-lock to attach the frame.

    Locking spindles & seatpost clamps are available from most bike shops for $30 or less. They are sold
    in sets of 2 spindles + seatpost, and come in a few different methods of locking. Go for the type
    which uses a five-sided allen key. Unless the thief has the exact same tool (VERY uncommon), he/she
    has no chance of pinching your wheels or seat.
     
  5. Cody

    Cody Guest

    "Luther Blissett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Sometimes I see cyclists remove their saddles when locking up their bikes. I don't know of anybody
    > who has had their saddle stolen, and was wondering how often it happens. Has anybody any
    > first-hand experience of saddle theft?

    I don't remove my saddle myself but the only person I know who does says he does it to make the bike
    more inconvenient to ride away. He takes the normal precautions of a lock etc.

    I read somewhere that it is a good idea to make it more difficult to ride the bike even if the cable
    or chain can be cut. The examples given were locking the padlock round the chain and a spoke so that
    even if the cable/chain is cut the bike still can't be riden. This won't stop a determined thief but
    it may make the casual one look elsewhere.
     
  6. Luther Blissett wrote:

    > Sometimes I see cyclists remove their saddles when locking up their bikes. I don't know of anybody
    > who has had their saddle stolen, and was wondering how often it happens. Has anybody any
    > first-hand experience of saddle theft?

    On a Great Vic bike ride about nine years ago there was a great moaning and whinging at breakfast
    time --- around 30 seats had been stolen during the night as someone's idea of a jokje. Pedals also
    dissappear at times. I didn't lose either, but on another Great Vic had my complete bike stolen :-(

    I have had bar ends stolen off my bike during the 45minutes it was locked to the fence outside a
    friend's house!

    Bikes are too dismantle-able, allan key and an adjustable spanner and all manner of bits
    can be nicked

    Adrian

    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Adrian Tritschler mailto:[email protected] Latitude 38°S, Longitude 145°E,
    Altitude 50m, Shoe size 44
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
     
  7. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "Cody" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I don't remove my saddle myself but the only person I know who does
    says he
    > does it to make the bike more inconvenient to ride away. He takes the
    normal
    > precautions of a lock etc.

    If my bike is not locked but in my view I will often "adjust" the brake calipers so that the pads
    are locked on to the wheel. This will make a quick getaway that little bit more difficult.

    hippy
     
  8. hippy <[email protected]> wrote:
    : "Cody" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    :> I don't remove my saddle myself but the only person I know who does
    : says he
    :> does it to make the bike more inconvenient to ride away. He takes the
    : normal
    :> precautions of a lock etc.

    : If my bike is not locked but in my view I will often "adjust" the brake calipers so that the pads
    : are locked on to the wheel. This will make a quick getaway that little bit more difficult.

    It occurs to me that putting the seat up the full extent of the post would be pretty discouraging
    too - unless, of course, you happened to fall prey to a bike stealing giraffe.

    Cheerz, Lynzz
     
  9. Jeremy Lunn

    Jeremy Lunn Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Lindsay Rowlands wrote:
    > It occurs to me that putting the seat up the full extent of the post would be pretty discouraging
    > too - unless, of course, you happened to fall prey to a bike stealing giraffe.

    In my case I have a 23" frame and the saddle is generally up fairly high to compensate for my
    height. I just hope there aren't all that many tall bicycle thieves out there! OTOH I think the
    professional bicycle thief probably uses a truck.

    --
    Jeremy Lunn Melbourne, Australia Homepage: http://www.austux.net/ http://www.jabber.org.au/ - the
    next generation of Instant Messaging.
     
  10. Notziggy

    Notziggy Guest

    I was given a great suggestion, Fill the allen key holes with putty and then paint them over with
    model paint. It means taking a little more time when servicing your bike but slows down the thief
    considerably.

    Adrian Tritschler wrote:

    > Luther Blissett wrote:
    >
    >> Sometimes I see cyclists remove their saddles when locking up their bikes. I don't know of
    >> anybody who has had their saddle stolen, and was wondering how often it happens. Has anybody any
    >> first-hand experience of saddle theft?
    >
    >
    > On a Great Vic bike ride about nine years ago there was a great moaning and whinging at breakfast
    > time --- around 30 seats had been stolen during the night as someone's idea of a jokje. Pedals
    > also dissappear at times. I didn't lose either, but on another Great Vic had my complete bike
    > stolen :-(
    >
    > I have had bar ends stolen off my bike during the 45minutes it was locked to the fence outside a
    > friend's house!
    >
    > Bikes are too dismantle-able, allan key and an adjustable spanner and all manner of bits can
    > be nicked
    >
    > Adrian
    >
    > ---------------------------------------------------------------
    > Adrian Tritschler mailto:[email protected] Latitude 38°S, Longitude 145°E,
    > Altitude 50m, Shoe size 44
    > ---------------------------------------------------------------
     
  11. On the subject of strange security measures...

    I covered my frame in black gaffa tape not just to prevent it from scrathcing but also to obscure
    the expensive brand name hence make it less attractive to theives. O an number of occasions I have
    had people look at the tape and say "Wow! A carbon fibre frame! Was that expensive?" If only I had
    my title deeds to the Harbour Bridge handy ...
     
  12. Megan Webb

    Megan Webb Guest

    I know of one occasion of a low life stealing a saddle. Face it - there are people about that will
    steal anything they can.

    Working on the idea to make my bike harder than the bikes around me, I use a 5 sided allen key on
    the saddle post bolt, and use a D-lock an cable lock - to keep the wheels attached on my
    commutter bike.

    Its just too much hassle to get back and find no seat or no wheels...

    Megan

    Luther Blissett <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Sometimes I see cyclists remove their saddles when locking up their bikes. I don't know of anybody
    > who has had their saddle stolen, and was wondering how often it happens. Has anybody any
    > first-hand experience of saddle theft?
     
  13. Jose Rizal

    Jose Rizal Guest

    Megan Webb:

    > I know of one occasion of a low life stealing a saddle. Face it - there are people about that will
    > steal anything they can.
    >
    > Working on the idea to make my bike harder than the bikes around me, I use a 5 sided allen key on
    > the saddle post bolt, and use a D-lock an cable lock - to keep the wheels attached on my
    > commutter bike.
    >
    > Its just too much hassle to get back and find no seat or no wheels...

    What do you do with the saddle rail plate bolt right under the saddle?

    There are keyed bolts sold by Kryptonite and Pitlock which replace bolts on various removables on
    your bike. Pitlock's bolts have a maximum limit torque of 10Nm, which is fine for stems, seatposts,
    saddle rails, brake mounts and headset caps, but seems too low for skewers. Coupled with cable and
    D-locks though, I'm sure these are more than just a bother to opportunity thieves.
     
  14. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    Megan Webb wrote:
    > Working on the idea to make my bike harder than the bikes around me, I use a 5 sided allen key on
    > the saddle post bolt ...

    I've never heard of these before - where do you get them from please?

    &roo
     
  15. Megan Webb

    Megan Webb Guest

    Bike shop... In Sydney I use Cheeky Monkey. www.cheekymonkey.com Have seen them in other shops also.
    Look also for the Pitlock gear.

    Megan

    Andrew Swan <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Megan Webb wrote:
    > > Working on the idea to make my bike harder than the bikes around me, I use a 5 sided allen key
    > > on the saddle post bolt ...
    >
    > I've never heard of these before - where do you get them from please?
    >
    > &roo
     
  16. Megan Webb

    Megan Webb Guest

    Jose Rizal <[email protected]_._> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Megan Webb:
    >
    > > I know of one occasion of a low life stealing a saddle. Face it - there are people about that
    > > will steal anything they can.
    > >
    > > Working on the idea to make my bike harder than the bikes around me, I use a 5 sided allen key
    > > on the saddle post bolt, and use a D-lock an cable lock - to keep the wheels attached on my
    > > commutter bike.
    > >
    > > Its just too much hassle to get back and find no seat or no wheels...
    >
    > What do you do with the saddle rail plate bolt right under the saddle?
    >

    Fill it with glue or not worry about it.

    I work on the idea that I want to make my bike harder to steal/vandalise than the bikes around me. I
    also figure that most theft is based on easy and opertunity - so you can make it increasingly harder
    to steal. If someone wants your bike, a petrol powered cutting tool will liberate it from what ever
    you chain it to, then they can carry it off and remove bits at their leasure.(I have heard of
    professional rackets with powertools and a van doing just this.)

    Vandals will wreck anything the mood takes them. Location of locking your bike can help though.
    There are places that I would not lock up my bike. eg here in Sydney, outside Redfern Station. Seen
    too many bikes there chained up with all the bits still on them, and the wheels bent, or frame
    bent. Chaining up a block away would be way safer.. Getting secure bike lockers would be another
    good idea...

    So at the end of the day, if you have a very expensive bike, you need to think about how to keep it
    and all the parts on it. One of my bikes, I never chain it up, it has no anti theft components at
    all. I always take it inside with me. Aren't folders great :)

    Megan

    > There are keyed bolts sold by Kryptonite and Pitlock which replace bolts on various removables on
    > your bike. Pitlock's bolts have a maximum limit torque of 10Nm, which is fine for stems,
    > seatposts, saddle rails, brake mounts and headset caps, but seems too low for skewers. Coupled
    > with cable and D-locks though, I'm sure these are more than just a bother to opportunity thieves.
     
  17. edd

    edd New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2003
    Messages:
    594
    Likes Received:
    0
    in 20 years.. bikes only been in chains for about 15 min. It usually comes with me, park in the office, spare room or just wear it as wrap. I've seen too many severed poles !
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...