Saddle woes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Powderfinger, Feb 18, 2003.

  1. Powderfinger

    Powderfinger New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2003
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey guys, I just bought a Trek 5200, and the Selle San Marco saddle is a disaster. I've heard a lot of complaints

    1: what is a good COMFORTABLE saddle?
    2: do you think the shop i bought the bike at will swap the saddle i got with the bike for a new one?
     
    Tags:


  2. rek

    rek New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2002
    Messages:
    1,190
    Likes Received:
    0
    Congrats on the new bike! Trek 5200, wow, you don't like to mess around, do you ;)

    I would simply ask your local bike store, I'm sure they'll be happy to help. Saddles seem to be very 'personal' things when it comes to fitting, I don't think there is "the" saddle for everybody, it all depends on personal preference.

    If I bought a bike like that from somewhere, I would pretty much expect a level of service where they would have no worries swapping the saddle (that is, if you haven't put too many miles on it already), and even to 'test-ride' saddles until you find one that suits you perfectly.

    I think my LBS offers that service no matter what bike you got from them (or even, if you didn't buy one from them .. I can't remember the exact details)
     
  3. Blimp

    Blimp New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    Aren't they all uncomfortable?
     
  4. steve

    steve Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2001
    Messages:
    5,266
    Likes Received:
    215
    A good bike shop will let you try a saddle before you buy, I wouldn't shop at one who didn't. I would also think they'd swap a 'new' saddle you brought from them without any issues.

    cheers!
     
  5. Blimp

    Blimp New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    For the uninitiated amongst us, how about a quick description of saddle types, why cost varies and how to avoid a bad one? Mine is something called a Selle Italia, which provides a powerful incentive to get out of the saddle whenever possible.

    May have something to do with the beer and pizza habit and 96 kg.
     
  6. steve

    steve Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2001
    Messages:
    5,266
    Likes Received:
    215
    Mines a gel Selle Italia turbo matic, I dont have any of the problems i had when I used a rolls or other cheap crappy saddles ;)
     
  7. Blimp

    Blimp New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Steve, just checked mine and can't find a turbo on it anywhere. Probably why I can't get up hills.

    Could you send me yours? You shouldn't need a turbo (no hills near Ballarat)
     
  8. steve

    steve Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2001
    Messages:
    5,266
    Likes Received:
    215
    There are a couple of good 5km climbs just down the road from here, but your right its nothing like tassie :D
     
  9. big_h

    big_h New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    146
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Guys

    The stock saddle on my old Nishiki MTB hurt me so much during and after my first "long distance" race that I had no feeling "down there" for two weeks. I went through a lot of panic and purchased a Vuelta saddle (I think it is called a Gents Specific Model and Distributed by Topgear in R of SA) with a slit in the top. This was a cheapie and I have now used it for one and a half years. I think it has more to do with the saddle shape than anything else. I must also mention that I weigh 121 kg. Quite a testemony for a cheapie saddle. I transferred the saddle to my Trek Hybrid and then to the Tandem. I have now done more than 7000km on this saddle. What I have also noticed now that my bum have become hard I can sit on any saddle in the spinning class with no ill effects. Anything from narrow unpadded racing saddles to the wide flared saddles that look more in place as a tractor. I agree the spinning class is only for an hour but I think Saddle time has a lot to do with it. Your own style also has a lot to do with saddle contact. As you become stronger and your style improves you "float" above the saddle more.

    Keep those wheels spinning!!!!!

    Big H
     
  10. crewman

    crewman New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2001
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trying to find a comfortable saddle is like buying new shoes. Not all shoes fit the same and the same goes for saddles.
    It took me 4 differrent saddles before finding the right one. I opted for a Selle italia Prolink "trans am" model. It was recommended to me from a club member and was fortunate enough to have borrowed his ride to try it out.
    I am now looking to put a new saddle on a new bike i have recently finished building up and was looking at the Selle Italia SLR "trans am" or the Selle San Marco "arami".

    Take your time, and keep in mind the area you are sitting on. I have had two major opertations to that area and was told to be very careful in the future.
     
  11. jalabert

    jalabert New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    My personal favorite is the Selle Italia Flite Genuine Gel, but again it all comes down to the ass in question :)
     
  12. steve

    steve Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2001
    Messages:
    5,266
    Likes Received:
    215
    Two weeks is a bloody long time :D
     
  13. peterwright

    peterwright New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2003
    Messages:
    533
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have just changed to a Selle Italia Turbomatic and early indications are good. I have had lots of problems getting comfortable and plenty of saddle sores. My past two saddles were a selle italia flite trans am which wasnt a great success, then I had a selle san marco ASPIDE which was very light but very hard !!! This is a tough area to get right but I am told that the pros go for comfort over weight every time.
     
  14. Copenhagen

    Copenhagen New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2003
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Quite a lot of the pro riders prefer the Turbo Matic saddle even though it's not a light wieght saddle in an way. I've only once had serious trouble with saddle sores. Assos' chamois creme got rid of it within a week.
     
  15. Mampara

    Mampara New Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2002
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    0
    I used my stock Selle Success for about 7 months before I did a 200km ride and that made up my mind to change my saddle. I got the Selle Italia XO Trans-am Magnesium. It is pretty lite, liter then the Flite, and VERY comfy. Give it a try, you'll be amazed on how comfortable cheaper saddles can be.
     
  16. RoadHazzardBuzz

    RoadHazzardBuzz New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Still trying to understand the 'logic' of why we torture ourselves and take padding off the seat, and add it to our shorts. :p Seems kinda bass ackwards doesn't it?
     
  17. dousmell

    dousmell New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2003
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    does anyone have any conjectures with regards to the fact that I've worn out two saddles on the right side, and my left legs' medial collateral ligament is in pain?

    am I just used to pedaling crooked? I used to have a problem with my fork, the dropouts were uneven and my bike tracked to one side, but I fixed it, the bike no longer tracks but I still have the problem with the saddle and leg.

    thanks
     
  18. late

    late New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2003
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Powderfinger- I use the WTB Speed V, and I like it.
    Dousell- you have a problem, probably more than one problem.
    You need to find out what it is, and fix it. Soon. The first thing to do is to see by how much the length of your legs differ. It could be something as simple as getting a left crankarm 5mm shorter than the right. But that is just a giess on my part. A unusually good bike shop, a cycling coach, or a sports specialist physician with experience in cycling injuries are the sort of people you need to start talking to.
     
  19. gally99

    gally99 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2003
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
  20. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs Guest

    You might consider consulting with a chiropractor; xrays may reveal a leg length discrepancy, an unlevel pelvis or even a scoliosis - all of which could contribute (in addition to your knee problem) to the abnormal wear that you describe.
     
Loading...
Loading...