Safety Kit for dark rides

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Drinky, Oct 8, 2003.

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  1. Drinky

    Drinky Guest

    Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously when
    cycling in the dark?
     
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  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Drinky" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    > when cycling in the dark?

    Brakes, tyres, reflectors, fluo/reflective clothing. But I wear the same in the day time as well
    (and indeed have the lights available too).

    Make sure you've got a decent front light...

    And I miss off one of your mentioned items.

    cheers, clive
     
  3. >Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    >when cycling in the dark?

    I wear a waistcoat with reflective stripes on it. I have two front lights and three rear lights.
    Bikesters have reflective strips on them too - and my gloves have a reflective strip on them. Plus
    my bike has wheel reflectors & front/back reflectors.

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    This is sent from a redundant email Mail sent to it is dumped My correct one can be gleaned from
    h*$el***$$n*$d$ot$**s**i$$m*$m$**on**[email protected]*$$a**$*ol*$*.*$$c$om*$ by getting rid of the
    overdependence on money and fame
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  4. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Drinky" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    > when cycling in the dark?

    Reflective ankle bands.

    Pete
     
  5. Drinky

    Drinky Guest

    > I wear a waistcoat with reflective stripes on it. I have two front lights
    and
    > three rear lights. Bikesters have reflective strips on them too - and my
    gloves
    > have a reflective strip on them. Plus my bike has wheel reflectors &
    front/back
    > reflectors.

    Can you let us know which of these dots you are responsible for?
    http://www.dark-skies.freeserve.co.uk/cfds/info/uk-night.gif
     
  6. Drinky wrote:
    > Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    > when cycling in the dark?
    >
    >
    Rear reflector, reflective Sam Browne belt and reflective leg bands. Legally I should also have
    pedal reflectors, but the SPDs can't take them - the leg bands are much brighter anyway.

    No helmet though!
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Drinky wrote:
    > Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    > when cycling in the dark?

    Next most useful items:

    1. Reflective clothing (or at least light coloured).
    2. Spare batteries and bulbs if you're likely to ever need them, and make sure all batteries are
    fresh - replace *before* lights get really dim.
    3. Spare extra shirt/gilet/jacket for temperature drops/breakdowns because dark tends to
    equal cold.
    4. Rear red reflector.

    ~PB
     
  8. Drinky tried to scribble ...

    > Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    > when cycling in the dark?

    Notalot, but then I don't cycle much at night .. Though the odd night hack across the local Forestry
    commission tract is rather exhilarating with only one front light .. ;)

    --
    Digweed '79 Beamish RL 250, '85 Swift Corvette, '88 Ford Escort 1.6 Ghia, '95 Dyna-Tech CroMo Comp,
    '97 Landrover Discovery 300 Tdi, '02 Schumacher CAT 3000, '03 Losi Kinwald Triple-X, '03 Associated
    RC10 B4 .... ;)
     
  9. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    "Drinky" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    > when cycling in the dark?

    If you've ever driven a car you'll be aware how effective retro-reflective things which move with
    pedalling motion are. They spell out 'cyclist ahead' more clearly than anything else. So
    retro-reflective widgets on pedals, shoes, trousercuffs are great. Retro-reflectors in wheels are
    also good for cars approaching from the side.

    If it's being seen by drivers of motor vehicles[1] which you're concerned about, good
    retro-reflectives are much more important than good lights, because they are independent of the
    state of your batteries/dynamo and because they reflect the motor vehicles much more powerful lights
    straight back at the driver, rather than spreading a relatively feeble glow through a wide arc.

    On the light front, legalities be damned. Flashing-type LED rear lights are far more noticable to a
    driver than steady rear lights, and as far as I'm concerned the jazzier the pattern the better. Some
    of the new LED front lights seem to deliver a lot of light for a long time, although of course they
    aren't in the same league as the halogen rechargeables. But in urban conditions you don't use the
    light to see so much as to be seen, and retro-reflectives are so much more effective than any light
    you can use.

    The other thing to say is there is absolutely no point to either lights or retro-reflectives which
    are obscured by dirt, clothing, luggage or whatever - check that yours are clean and can be seen.

    I have to confess my reaction to retro-reflective belts and so on is similar to the paving slab
    fairy's reaction to bib-shorts - I consider them a mortal offence against good taste and aesthetics,
    and I personally would not be seen alive or dead in one. But there's no doubt they're effective.

    Having said all this I don't personally use any of it, except on my road bike which has rear and
    wheel retro-reflectors. My pedals are all SPDs with no reflectors, and my hill bikes have anything
    which might reflect ruthlessly removed. I usually cycle in black bib longs and a grey jersey
    (although my rain top is flourescent yellow). But then I live in a very quiet place with very
    little traffic. All my bikes have flashing-type LED rear lights, and my road bike has a battery
    front light as well.

    [1] Provided of course the drivers have their lights on...

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; in faecibus sapiens rheum propagabit
     
  10. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Drinky" asked what we wear to become more invisible at night and Helen aka
    PSF replied:
    > > I wear a waistcoat with reflective stripes on it. I have two front
    lights
    > and
    > > three rear lights. Bikesters have reflective strips on them too - and my
    > gloves
    > > have a reflective strip on them. Plus my bike has wheel reflectors &
    > front/back
    > > reflectors.

    Which prompted Drinky to respond:
    > Can you let us know which of these dots you are responsible for?
    > http://www.dark-skies.freeserve.co.uk/cfds/info/uk-night.gif

    Drinky, here's a clue: Picture the present day incarnation of Bodica hurling paving slabs at
    b*b-short wearing invaders on two wheeled self-propelled chariots to defend the same lands as
    her ancestor.

    Pete
     
  11. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    Drinky wrote:

    >Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    >when cycling in the dark?

    A helmet is not just for night wear.

    Reflective jacket.
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
  12. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    Zog The Undeniable wrote:

    >Drinky wrote:
    >> Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    >> when cycling in the dark?
    >>
    >>
    >Rear reflector, reflective Sam Browne belt and reflective leg bands. Legally I should also have
    >pedal reflectors, but the SPDs can't take them - the leg bands are much brighter anyway.

    My SPDs can.

    >No helmet though!

    --
    remove remove to reply
     
  13. Peter Fox

    Peter Fox Guest

    Following on from Drinky's message. . .
    >Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    >when cycling in the dark?

    Remember: A 'dog collar' may be white but it isn't reflective.

    Don't cannon into people - Dressed in vestments in the dark you can't be seen and move in
    mysterious ways.

    Remember the trinity: A bell, book(Cyclecraft) and candle (so people can see you).

    Keep to the straight (but not the narrow).

    Novices have bad habits.

    Cross when you see the light.

    --
    PETER FOX Not the same since the deckchair business folded

    Witham Cycling Campaign www.eminent.demon.co.uk/wcc.htm East Anglian Pub cycle rides
    www.eminent.demon.co.uk/rides
     
  14. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Drinky wrote:
    > Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    > when cycling in the dark?

    Another 2 or 3 front lights, ditto rear lights. Reflective arm bands (for signalling), plenty of
    reflective tape on the bike, spokes and the non-braking surfaces of the rims. Helmet in winter to
    keep my head warm, it also makes a great lighting platform and has a reflective band wrapped round
    it. This winter it will also have flashing red horns:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/hornydan.jpg

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  15. Tim Cain

    Tim Cain Guest

    news:[email protected]...
    > "Drinky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    > > when cycling in the dark?
    >
    > Brakes, tyres, reflectors, fluo/reflective clothing. But I wear the same in the day time as well
    > (and indeed have the lights available too).
    >
    > Make sure you've got a decent front light...
    >
    > And I miss off one of your mentioned items.
    >

    Heresy! You'll be dead by dawn!

    Which one is it: Front or tail light? ;-)

    Tim.

    PS. I'm probably missing it too.

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.522 / Virus Database: 320 - Release Date: 29/09/03
     
  16. >This winter it will also have flashing red horns: http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/hornydan.jpg

    You do realise that the sight of you wearing that on your head, combined with nips exposed due
    to foul wearing of item of clothing that is spawn of satan anyhow is enough to drive a body
    mad, Danny ;-)

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    This is sent from a redundant email Mail sent to it is dumped My correct one can be gleaned from
    h*$el***$$n*$d$ot$**s**i$$m*$m$**on**[email protected]*$$a**$*ol*$*.*$$c$om*$ by getting rid of the
    overdependence on money and fame
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  17. Geoff Bowles

    Geoff Bowles Guest

    I don't cycle much at night, but I drive a lot, and agree about the effectiveness of reflective
    shoes, ankle bands etc - they stand out very well, and make it obvious that it's a bicycle ahead -
    even when visibility is obscured by headlights coming the other way

    On the other hand one of my pet hates is cycles with just a flashing light at the rear. Perhaps it's
    just my eyes, but it's very difficult to judge the distance to a flashing light when there are no
    other clues - especially when you have to pick it out from lots of other red lights in traffic. If I
    only have one light on my bike I make sure it's set to "steady light" and that my clothing will
    stand out - including the reflective bits on my bright yellow cycling shoes. If I'm planning to ride
    at night (as opposed to being caught out by darkness) I also use a flashing light, but fitted some
    way from the steady one to provide following drivers with something to judge size and distance

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Drinky" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > > Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    > > when cycling in the dark?
    >
    > If you've ever driven a car you'll be aware how effective retro-reflective things which move with
    > pedalling motion are. They spell out 'cyclist ahead' more clearly than anything else. So
    > retro-reflective widgets on pedals, shoes, trousercuffs are great. Retro-reflectors in wheels are
    > also good for cars approaching from the side.
    >
    > If it's being seen by drivers of motor vehicles[1] which you're concerned about, good
    > retro-reflectives are much more important than good lights, because they are independent of the
    > state of your batteries/dynamo and because they reflect the motor vehicles much more powerful
    > lights straight back at the driver, rather than spreading a relatively feeble glow through a
    > wide arc.
    >
    > On the light front, legalities be damned. Flashing-type LED rear lights are far more noticable to
    > a driver than steady rear lights, and as far as I'm concerned the jazzier the pattern the better.
    > Some of the new LED front lights seem to deliver a lot of light for a long time, although of
    > course they aren't in the same league as the halogen rechargeables. But in urban conditions you
    > don't use the light to see so much as to be seen, and retro-reflectives are so much more effective
    > than any light you can use.
    >
    > The other thing to say is there is absolutely no point to either lights or retro-reflectives which
    > are obscured by dirt, clothing, luggage or whatever - check that yours are clean and can be seen.
    >
    > I have to confess my reaction to retro-reflective belts and so on is similar to the paving slab
    > fairy's reaction to bib-shorts - I consider them a mortal offence against good taste and
    > aesthetics, and I personally would not be seen alive or dead in one. But there's no doubt they're
    > effective.
    >
    > Having said all this I don't personally use any of it, except on my road bike which has rear and
    > wheel retro-reflectors. My pedals are all SPDs with no reflectors, and my hill bikes have anything
    > which might reflect ruthlessly removed. I usually cycle in black bib longs and a grey jersey
    > (although my rain top is flourescent yellow). But then I live in a very quiet place with very
    > little traffic. All my bikes have flashing-type LED rear lights, and my road bike has a battery
    > front light as well.
    >
    > [1] Provided of course the drivers have their lights on...
    >
    > --
    > [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    >
    > ;; in faecibus sapiens rheum propagabit
     
  18. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    wafflyDIRTYcatLITTERhcsBOX wrote:
    > You do realise that the sight of you wearing that on your head, combined with nips exposed due to
    > foul wearing of item of clothing that is spawn of satan anyhow is enough to drive a body mad,
    > Danny ;-)

    Nips exposed in winte^^^^^ sleet? Brrrr!

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  19. Tina Eager

    Tina Eager Guest

  20. Drinky wrote:

    >Apart from helmet, tail-light and front-light, what other safety gear do people use religiously
    >when cycling in the dark?
    >
    A headlight (AKA miners' lamp) Even a 3-LEd one is surprisingly effective; I now feel safer in the
    dark than I do in daylight. And yes, reflective material everywhere, and spare lights (not just
    bulbs or batteries: complete lights) front and rear.

    Mark van Gorkom.
     
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