Sag Wagon

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by John Everett, May 12, 2004.

  1. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    I just finished watching Stage 4 of the Giro, telecast live here in
    the States on OLN (Outdoor Life Network). Phil Liggett, famous Brit
    announcer, referred to the "sag wagon" which was trailing the field.

    We've had some debates on rec.bicycling.* over the years on the origin
    of the term, which is commonly used here. Is this a common British
    term or something Phil has picked up on his travels? If the former,
    does anyone know the origin?


    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
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  2. MSA

    MSA Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, jeverett3
    @earthlink.DEFEAT.UCE.BOTS.net says...
    > I just finished watching Stage 4 of the Giro, telecast live here in
    > the States on OLN (Outdoor Life Network). Phil Liggett, famous Brit
    > announcer, referred to the "sag wagon" which was trailing the field.
    >
    > We've had some debates on rec.bicycling.* over the years on the origin
    > of the term, which is commonly used here. Is this a common British
    > term or something Phil has picked up on his travels? If the former,
    > does anyone know the origin?
    >
    >
    > jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
    >


    Yes, it is a well used term and not a Liggettism. Some believe it comes
    from the word sagging, I.e., sagging off the back. Others believe it is
    an acronym for Support And Gear. Take your pick :)


    --
    Mark (MSA)
    This post is packaged by intellectual weight, not volume. Some settling
    of contents may have occurred during transmission
     
  3. Mike Gayler

    Mike Gayler Guest

    MSA <[email protected]> writed in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>, jeverett3
    > @earthlink.DEFEAT.UCE.BOTS.net says...
    >> I just finished watching Stage 4 of the Giro, telecast live here in
    >> the States on OLN (Outdoor Life Network). Phil Liggett, famous Brit
    >> announcer, referred to the "sag wagon" which was trailing the field.
    >>
    >> We've had some debates on rec.bicycling.* over the years on the
    >> origin of the term, which is commonly used here. Is this a common
    >> British term or something Phil has picked up on his travels? If the
    >> former, does anyone know the origin?
    >>
    >>
    >> jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
    >>

    >
    > Yes, it is a well used term and not a Liggettism. Some believe it
    > comes from the word sagging, I.e., sagging off the back. Others
    > believe it is an acronym for Support And Gear. Take your pick :)
    >

    I'm pretty sure it predates the term 'gear' (gear meaning 'stuff' or
    equipment - which I think is a late '60s term)
     
  4. On Wed, 12 May 2004 16:46:59 GMT, John Everett
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >We've had some debates on rec.bicycling.* over the years on the origin
    >of the term, which is commonly used here. Is this a common British
    >term or something Phil has picked up on his travels? If the former,
    >does anyone know the origin?


    Used enough in the U.S. and Britain to show up in some of my older
    books, including some reprints of books from the 30s and 40s. Treating
    it like an acronym was not very common until sometime in the later
    60s. Earlier treated it like an ordinary word. In the first version of
    Best of Bicycling (before that would be a satirical name for a book),
    ?Clifton Graves? uses it as a non-acronym. Was also used in some of
    the Chas Messenger books IIRC, again as a non-acronym.

    I personally never saw the 'Sag And Gear' breakout until Compuserve in
    the early years, on the bicycle forum. At the time it was more like
    someone trying to make up words to fit an acronym that wasn't.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  5. On Wed, 12 May 2004 16:46:59 GMT, John Everett
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >We've had some debates on rec.bicycling.* over the years on the origin
    >of the term, which is commonly used here. Is this a common British
    >term or something Phil has picked up on his travels? If the former,
    >does anyone know the origin?


    Old-style cycling term, for sure. I am pretty confident, as the
    others are, that "Support And Gear" (or the recursive Sag And Gear)
    are backronyms; sag is less used now but certainly used to be in
    common parlance for running out of steam, as in "sagging".

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  6. >> Yes, it is a well used term and not a Liggettism.
    >> Some believe it comes from the word sagging, I.e.,
    >> sagging off the back. Others believe it is an acronym
    >> for Support And Gear. Take your pick :)

    >
    > I'm pretty sure it predates the term 'gear'
    > (gear meaning 'stuff' or equipment -
    > which I think is a late '60s term)


    1860s, maybe.

    "And if thou thinkest the price be high, in steer and gear and stack,
    Give me my father's mare again, and I'll fight my own way back!"
    -- Rudyard Kipling, "The Ballad of East and West" (1889)
     
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