Salanson

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Tispectrum, Jun 4, 2003.

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  1. Tispectrum

    Tispectrum Guest

    French rider's post-mortem shows no drugs

    by Patrick Vignal

    BERLIN, June 4 (Reuters) - The post-mortem of French cycling hope Fabrice Salanson
    revealed no trace of injury or drugs but further tests still have to be performed,
    German state prosecutors said on Wednesday. The promising 23-year-old Brioches La
    Boulangere rider was found in his hotel room in the eastern German city of Dresden on
    Tuesday morning. He had died between 0230 and 0400 local time (0030-0200 GMT).

    His body was found by a team mate shortly before the start of Tuesday's first stage of
    the seven-day Tour of Germany cycle race from which the French stable subsequently
    pulled out.

    Dresden state prosecutors, who launched an investigation into Salanson's death, said the
    post-mortem had been completed on Tuesday.

    "It showed no trace of injuries or blows and no stimulant was found in the body," a
    spokesman for the prosecutors said.

    Spokesman Andreas Ferron said vials and pills had been found in a bag belonging to
    Salanson but contained no illegal substances.

    Further blood tests would be conducted at an IOC-accredited laboratory in Kreischa,
    Germany, the results of which would not be known before Friday, he added.

    "Those tests are aimed at establishing whether EPO could be connected to the death,"
    Feron said.

    Cycling, like other endurance sports, is particularly prone to drug-taking with many
    positive tests for the blood-boosting drug erythropoietin (EPO), which scientists say
    can lead to heart attacks.

    TWO VICTORIES

    Tour of Germany organisers said on Tuesday that everything indicated that Salanson had
    died of natural causes.

    Race doctor Georg Huber said he had been to Salanson's hotel on Monday evening to cure
    one of his team mates of a minor problem. Salanson had not asked to see him, he said.

    Salanson joined the Brioches team this year after riding with Bonjour from 2000 to 2002.

    He won two professional events, his most important victory being on the second stage of
    the Midi Libre in May 2002.

    Salanson also had a stage win in the Tour de l'Avenir in 2000, his first year of
    professional cycling.

    Brioches were one of six French teams named last month to ride in this year's Tour
    de France.

    Team manager Jean-Rene Bernaudeau said that Salanson's room mate Sylvain Chavanel had
    found him lying at the foot of his bed when he went to wake him in the morning.

    Salanson became the third active professional rider to die this year. Italian Denis
    Zanette died of heart attack in January after having his teeth cleaned by a dentist.
    Kazakh Andrei Kivilev died in March after a crash in the Paris-Nice race.
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    "tispectrum" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Further blood tests would be conducted at an IOC-accredited laboratory in Kreischa,
    > Germany, the results of which would not be known before Friday, he added.
    >
    > "Those tests are aimed at establishing whether EPO could be connected to the death,"
    > Feron said.

    Any idea what kind of tests they could be doing that are not possible from blood samples taken
    during competition, but would say something about possible use of synthetic EPO, rather than the
    usual high HM rate? Something done using liver cells? I suppose that it is just a coincidence
    that the lab doing the post-mortem analysis would happen to be IOC-accredited as well. Why would
    that matter?

    jyh.

    --
    =====================================================================
    jean-yves herve' /\ Department of Computer Science \/ e-mail --> [email protected] and Statistics /\
    University of Rhode Island \/ Tel. --> (401) 874-4400 Kingston, RI 02881-0816 /\ Fax. --> (401)
    874-4617 USA \/
    =====================================================================
     
  3. Kyle Legate

    Kyle Legate Guest

    tispectrum wrote:
    > French rider's post-mortem shows no drugs
    >
    > BERLIN, June 4 (Reuters) - The post-mortem of French cycling hope Fabrice Salanson
    > revealed no trace of injury or drugs but further tests still have to be performed,
    > German state prosecutors said on Wednesday.
    >
    If he was taking something that cannot be detected by the UCIs blood tests, I doubt the coroner will
    find anything.

    > TWO VICTORIES
    >
    > Tour of Germany organisers said on Tuesday that everything indicated that Salanson had
    > died of natural causes.
    >
    I have a hard time believing that a 23 year old could die of natural causes that elude autopsy.
     
  4. Peter Allen

    Peter Allen Guest

    "Kyle Legate" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > tispectrum wrote:
    > > French rider's post-mortem shows no drugs
    > >
    > > BERLIN, June 4 (Reuters) - The post-mortem of French cycling hope Fabrice Salanson
    > > revealed no trace of injury or drugs but further tests still have to be performed,
    > > German state prosecutors said on Wednesday.
    > >
    > If he was taking something that cannot be detected by the UCIs blood
    tests,
    > I doubt the coroner will find anything.
    >
    >
    > > TWO VICTORIES
    > >
    > > Tour of Germany organisers said on Tuesday that everything indicated that Salanson
    > > had died of natural causes.
    > >
    > I have a hard time believing that a 23 year old could die of natural
    causes
    > that elude autopsy.

    It happens, occasionally. In particular, minor heart problems (arrythmia and similar) can cause the
    heart to stop when the heart rate is low - and of course a very fit cyclist will tend to have a low
    resting heart rate. The falling off the bed bit would fit that.

    Peter
     
  5. Scott

    Scott Guest

    "Peter Allen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Kyle Legate" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]... It happens, occasionally. In particular, minor
    > heart problems (arrythmia
    and
    > similar) can cause the heart to stop when the heart rate is low - and of course a very fit cyclist
    > will tend to have a low resting heart rate.

    Especially when one's blood is thick as molasses. HR gets slower in sleep, the heart has trouble
    pushing that mud around at low revs. Can anyone count how many cyclists have died in their sleep or
    of heart attack in the EPO era?

    Bert Oosterbosch, died at 32 years Vicente Lopez-Carril, died at 37 years Marc Demeyer, died at 32
    years Geert Van de Walle, died at the age of 24 years Joaquim Halupczok, died at 26 years and there
    were a bunch of Dutchies...
     
  6. Benjo Maso

    Benjo Maso Guest

    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Peter Allen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "Kyle Legate" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]... It happens, occasionally. In particular,
    > > minor heart problems (arrythmia
    > and
    > > similar) can cause the heart to stop when the heart rate is low - and of course a very fit
    > > cyclist will tend to have a low resting heart rate.
    >
    > Especially when one's blood is thick as molasses. HR gets slower in sleep, the heart has trouble
    > pushing that mud around at low revs. Can anyone
    count
    > how many cyclists have died in their sleep or of heart attack in the EPO era?
    >
    > Bert Oosterbosch, died at 32 years Vicente Lopez-Carril, died at 37 years Marc Demeyer, died at 32
    > years Geert Van de Walle, died at the age of 24 years Joaquim Halupczok, died at 26 years and
    > there were a bunch of Dutchies...

    Before making accusations, a little bit prudence might be called for. EPO was introduced in bicycle
    racing in 1988. Lopez-Carril died in 1980 (after he had finished his career), Demeyer in 1982. So
    their causes of death had absolutely nothing to do with EPO. The others? Nobody knows.

    Benjo Maso
     
  7. Kyle Legate

    Kyle Legate Guest

    Peter Allen wrote:
    >
    > It happens, occasionally. In particular, minor heart problems (arrythmia and similar) can cause
    > the heart to stop when the heart rate is low - and of course a very fit cyclist will tend to have
    > a low resting heart rate. The falling off the bed bit would fit that.
    >
    I thought that as part of belonging to a team, regular medical testing was part of the game. That
    would include some form of ECG measurement that ought to detect heartbeat abnormalities. There was a
    rider in recent memory (name escapes me at the moment) who had to retire from racing due to an
    abnormal heartbeat that was first detected during this type of routine test.
     
  8. On Wed, 4 Jun 2003 19:23:40 -0400, Kyle Legate wrote:
    >I thought that as part of belonging to a team, regular medical testing was part of the game. That
    >would include some form of ECG measurement that ought to detect heartbeat abnormalities. There was
    >a rider in recent memory (name escapes me at the moment) who had to retire from racing due to an
    >abnormal heartbeat that was first detected during this type of routine test.

    Danny Nelissen (NED), went off to win the amateur world road championship in Colombia. He's the
    Dutch language (Holland and Flanders) reporter for Eurosport now; I guess it runs in the family
    because Jean Nelissen, the looooong time cycling reporter (print, radio, tv), is his uncle. And more
    recently Steve Vermaut (BEL).
     
  9. "Ewoud Dronkert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 4 Jun 2003 19:23:40 -0400, Kyle Legate wrote:
    > >I thought that as part of belonging to a team, regular medical testing
    was
    > >part of the game. That would include some form of ECG measurement that
    ought
    > >to detect heartbeat abnormalities. There was a rider in recent memory
    (name
    > >escapes me at the moment) who had to retire from racing due to an
    abnormal
    > >heartbeat that was first detected during this type of routine test.
    >
    > Danny Nelissen (NED), went off to win the amateur world road championship in Colombia. He's the
    > Dutch language (Holland and Flanders) reporter for Eurosport now; I guess it runs in the family
    > because Jean Nelissen, the looooong time cycling reporter (print, radio, tv), is his uncle. And
    > more recently Steve Vermaut (BEL).

    there was something about Nico Mattan too, wasn't there? And did't Danny
    Nelissen return to racing after the diagnosis, before he became a reporter?

    Alexander
     
  10. Mike Murray

    Mike Murray Guest

    "Kyle Legate" <[email protected]> wrote: "I have a hard time believing that a 23 year old could
    die of natural causes that elude autopsy."

    I don't. I have seen several sudden deaths, including children, where the cause was not apparant
    after autopsy. Life is not like CSI: Miami.

    --
    Mike Murray MD
     
  11. On Thu, 05 Jun 2003 09:41:17 GMT, Alexander Lackner wrote:
    >> Danny Nelissen (NED), went off to win the amateur world road championship in Colombia.
    >
    >did't Danny Nelissen return to racing after the diagnosis, before he became a reporter?

    That's what I meant. He was a pro, was forced to retire (or should I say resign) but the next year
    won amateur Worlds very convincingly. Maybe that was one of the reasons why they scrapped the
    amateur event at Worlds.

    Don't know if he got another pro contract after that, but if he did it was only for a year or so.
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, "Alexander Lackner"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Ewoud Dronkert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > On Wed, 4 Jun 2003 19:23:40 -0400, Kyle Legate wrote:
    > > >I thought that as part of belonging to a team, regular medical testing
    > was
    > > >part of the game. That would include some form of ECG measurement that
    > ought
    > > >to detect heartbeat abnormalities. There was a rider in recent memory
    > (name
    > > >escapes me at the moment) who had to retire from racing due to an
    > abnormal
    > > >heartbeat that was first detected during this type of routine test.
    > >
    > > Danny Nelissen (NED), went off to win the amateur world road championship in Colombia. He's the
    > > Dutch language (Holland and Flanders) reporter for Eurosport now; I guess it runs in the family
    > > because Jean Nelissen, the looooong time cycling reporter (print, radio, tv), is his uncle. And
    > > more recently Steve Vermaut (BEL).
    >
    >
    > there was something about Nico Mattan too, wasn't there? And did't Danny
    > Nelissen return to racing after the diagnosis, before he became a reporter?
    >
    > Alexander

    I think the story with Mattan was that he had an irregular heart beat but it was treated and he was
    able to keep racing. However, not everyone is that lucky. Eric De Vlaeminks son ( think his name was
    Christian) had the same problem. But he was told not to race anymore (cyclocross) at the elite
    level, but he kept racing and he died of a heart attack.
     
  13. Scott

    Scott Guest

    "benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Before making accusations, a little bit prudence might be called for. EPO was introduced in
    > bicycle racing in 1988. Lopez-Carril died in 1980 (after he had finished his career), Demeyer in
    > 1982. So their causes of death had absolutely nothing to do with EPO. The others? Nobody knows.
    >
    > Benjo Maso

    What accusations? All I said was a bunch of competitive cyclists died under suspicious
    circumstances. You can draw your own hypotheses. I agree that only the athlete and his doctor
    knows for sure.

    My bad for copying names out of Voet's (sp) book - you're right about the pre-1988 deaths. But you
    take a guy like Halupchok (sp). He shows up out of nowhere, wins worlds, nearly wins the Giro, then
    dies in his sleep. Kinda weird. And there WERE a half dozen Dutch cyclists - men and women - who got
    their hands on EPO during the early years and died in their sleep (before everybody got smart and
    had the doctor dole it out carefully with the help of portable hematocrit meters in the team bus).
    It sure looked like they got too much of a good thing.
     
  14. > And there WERE a half dozen Dutch cyclists - men and women - who got their hands on EPO during the
    > early years and died in their sleep.

    Have the names of these oft quoted corpses ever been made known?

    Regards! Stephen
     
  15. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    Yes. And the fiancee of one of them has been interviewed on tv with part of that interview having
    been broadcast here in the US........I don't recall the year or network, but i do have it on tape.
    If I ever come across it while viewing during a period of insomnia, I'll make you a copy. :)

    "Steve McGinty" <[email protected]_DOT_.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > And there WERE a half dozen Dutch cyclists - men and women - who got their hands on EPO during
    > > the early years and died in their sleep.
    >
    > Have the names of these oft quoted corpses ever been made known?
    >
    >
    > Regards! Stephen
     
  16. Greg Hall

    Greg Hall Guest

    Or while on the attack? I'm don't remember if a reason was ever fround for Bjorn Stenersens (former
    Motorola team member)death.

    From cyclingnews.com archives:

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/results/1998/sep98/sep16.shtml

    "Norwegian rider dies Last Saturday, the Norwegian rider Bjorn Stenersen (Team Bjorgvin) died during
    the road-cup final in Trondheim, Norway. Stenersen (28) was in an attack with four other riders,
    when he suddenly fell off his bike and died. The reason for Stenersen's death has not yet been
    announced."

    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Especially when one's blood is thick as molasses. HR gets slower in sleep, the heart has trouble
    > pushing that mud around at low revs. Can anyone count how many cyclists have died in their sleep
    > or of heart attack in the EPO era?
    >
    > Bert Oosterbosch, died at 32 years Vicente Lopez-Carril, died at 37 years Marc Demeyer, died at 32
    > years Geert Van de Walle, died at the age of 24 years Joaquim Halupczok, died at 26 years and
    > there were a bunch of Dutchies...
     
  17. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

    Is that really a TV show, or a joke (or both)?

    "Mike Murray" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Kyle Legate" <[email protected]> wrote: "I have a hard time believing that a 23 year old could
    > die of natural
    causes
    > that elude autopsy."
    >
    > I don't. I have seen several sudden deaths, including children, where the cause was not apparant
    > after autopsy. Life is not like CSI: Miami.
    >
    > --
    > Mike Murray MD
     
  18. Benjo Maso

    Benjo Maso Guest

    "scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Before making accusations, a little bit prudence might be called for.
    EPO
    > > was introduced in bicycle racing in 1988. Lopez-Carril died in 1980
    (after
    > > he had finished his career), Demeyer in 1982. So their causes of death
    had
    > > absolutely nothing to do with EPO. The others? Nobody knows.
    > >
    > > Benjo Maso
    >
    > What accusations? All I said was a bunch of competitive cyclists died under suspicious
    > circumstances. You can draw your own hypotheses. I agree that only the athlete and his doctor
    > knows for sure.
    >
    > My bad for copying names out of Voet's (sp) book - you're right about the pre-1988 deaths. But you
    > take a guy like Halupchok (sp). He shows up out of nowhere, wins worlds, nearly wins the Giro,
    > then dies in his sleep. Kinda weird. And there WERE a half dozen Dutch cyclists - men and women -
    > who got their hands on EPO during the early years and died in their sleep (before everybody got
    > smart and had the doctor dole it out carefully with the help of portable hematocrit meters in the
    > team bus). It sure looked like they got too much of a good thing.

    Of course, nobody willl deny that there is very strong statstical evidence that the end of the
    eighties, when cyclists and athletes were beginning to experiment with epo, quite a bunch of them
    must have payed for it with their own lifes. On the other hand, that doesn't mean much for
    individual casea. So I think a bit some prudence is called for. Especially because nowadays any
    early death of a cyclist is immediately ascribed to the use of doping, with or without good reason
    (see the case of Zanette, for instance).

    Benjo Maso
     
  19. Dashi Toshii

    Dashi Toshii Guest

    "benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Of course, nobody willl deny that there is very strong statstical evidence that the end of the
    > eighties, when cyclists and athletes were beginning to experiment with epo, quite a bunch of them
    > must have payed for it with
    their
    > own lifes. On the other hand, that doesn't mean much for individual casea. So I think a bit some
    > prudence is called for. Especially because nowadays any early death of a cyclist is immediately
    > ascribed to the use of doping, with or without good reason (see the case of Zanette, for
    > instance).
    >
    > Benjo Maso

    Are you actually aware of what a "Benjo" is?

    If you are not I hope that you never meet a Japanese person.

    Dashii
     
  20. Ken Prager

    Ken Prager Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Dashi Toshii" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "benjo maso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > [snip]
    > >
    > > Benjo Maso
    >
    > Are you actually aware of what a "Benjo" is?
    >
    > If you are not I hope that you never meet a Japanese person.
    >

    Are you actually aware of what a "Toshii" is?

    If you are not I hope that you never go to a gay bathhouse if San Francisco.

    KP

    --
    Remove _me_ for e-mail address
     
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