San Francisco - suggestions please

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by patrice, Mar 11, 2005.

  1. patrice

    patrice Guest

    Hey nice folks -

    You've always given me great suggestions in the past...so I figured I'd
    imposed again:

    The spouse and I are going to San Francisco on March 19th, for a week.
    Could you guys suggest wonderful places to eat?
    Spouse will eat most anything. I don't eat meat but will eat seafood.
    While on trips we both enjoy eating at restaurants that are frequented
    by locals.

    And as long as I've got your attention....can you guys recommend things
    to see and do? I was out there once 17 years ago - what I remember the
    most, was just how beautiful is. Since we aren't planning on renting a
    car - unless you folks suggest that maybe we should - tours might be the
    way to go to see the sights. I've noticed that there are many many
    tours available - but I have no clue as to which are the better ones.
    They all appear to have great marketing folks working for them.

    As always - thank you all very much in advance.

    patrice
     
    Tags:


  2. aem

    aem Guest

    patrice wrote:
    > [snip]
    > The spouse and I are going to San Francisco on March 19th, for a
    > week. Could you guys suggest wonderful places to eat?
    > Spouse will eat most anything. I don't eat meat but will eat seafood.


    > While on trips we both enjoy eating at restaurants that are
    > frequented by locals.
    > [snip]


    The Slanted Door, in the Ferry Building at Embarcadero, is an upscale,
    modern Vietnamese restaurant that combines Vietnamese tradition with
    the freshest and best local ingredients. You'll have no trouble
    finding wonderful non-meat menu items. IMHO it is one of the very
    restaurants that lives up to "asian-californian-fusion" hype.

    Oh, and it's definitely frequented by locals. For a couple of years
    after it opened the reservations waiting list was months long. Check
    with your hotel concierge immediately on arrival.

    And this is from someone who has been enjoying SF Chinatown since the
    60's. My honorable ancestors are spinning in their graves.

    -aem
     
  3. patrice

    patrice Guest

    aem wrote:
    > patrice wrote:
    >
    >> [snip]
    >>The spouse and I are going to San Francisco on March 19th, for a
    >>week. Could you guys suggest wonderful places to eat?
    >>Spouse will eat most anything. I don't eat meat but will eat seafood.

    >
    >
    >>While on trips we both enjoy eating at restaurants that are
    >>frequented by locals.
    >>[snip]

    >
    >
    > The Slanted Door, in the Ferry Building at Embarcadero, is an upscale,
    > modern Vietnamese restaurant that combines Vietnamese tradition with
    > the freshest and best local ingredients. You'll have no trouble
    > finding wonderful non-meat menu items. IMHO it is one of the very
    > restaurants that lives up to "asian-californian-fusion" hype.
    >
    > Oh, and it's definitely frequented by locals. For a couple of years
    > after it opened the reservations waiting list was months long. Check
    > with your hotel concierge immediately on arrival.
    >
    > And this is from someone who has been enjoying SF Chinatown since the
    > 60's. My honorable ancestors are spinning in their graves.
    >
    > -aem
    >


    Hey that was quick - thanks!
    Sounds like a terriffic place!

    patrice
     
  4. Leila

    Leila Guest

    You should check out chowhound.com for restaurant ideas. They are more
    active than ba.food and you'll see lots of reviews and suggestions.
    We're not into high rent restaurants particularly, although we did have
    a memorable meal at Fringale, a bistro South of Market that the French
    chefs at the Culinary Academy adore. The food was delicious, the
    service correct but friendly, the atmosphere relaxed.

    As for what to do for a week - go to the California Historical Society
    and get a book of walking tours of San Francisco. Get a bus pass and
    ride cable cars and busses for a day. Take a foodie walking tour of
    Chinatown (I mean to do that myself one of these days). Go to the
    Saturday farmer's market at the Ferry BUilding, natch. Ride the ferry
    to Tiburon or Sausalito.

    I like walking around Russian Hill, North Beach, Cow Hollow, Pacific
    Heights - but the neighborhoods are too numerous to name. Recently we
    popped into the SF Art Institute on Russian Hill at about 9 pm on a
    Saturday night, wandered around the edges of a truly fabulous rooftop
    wedding, wandered through the halls to a courtyard with a Moorish
    fountain, looked at art in studios and galleries, gazed at the
    sparkling lights on the Bay from the roof. It's a special place, and
    the cafeteria (great views) is open to the public. The whole thing is
    open to the public, seemingly all night long. Don't know how they do
    it.

    You'll want to go to Muir Woods, and if you do rent a car for the day,
    wander the Marin headlands maybe, or take a bus out there and do it on
    foot or by bike (warning you, it's not for amateurs).

    A tour to Sonoma would be nice (I prefer it to Napa, Sonoma town is old
    and walkable and quaint, the winery scene not so vast and honky tonk as
    Napa) so you don't have to do the driving, if you're tasting.

    Don't forget to check out the Mission - including Valencia and other
    nearby streets - active restaurant scene, including various Spanish and
    South American restaurants. Mariachis wander at night, playing for
    tips. I lived in NYC in the old days so I don't find the Mission
    daunting but be aware that it's very urban and has lots of street
    people.

    Ethnic food I like: fast tandoor and curry places like Naan n Curry or
    Pakwan - these are local "chains" with several branches; Vietnamese
    sandwich shops and restaurants in the Tenderloin. But chowhound folks
    have more knowledge than I do.

    You may find it fun to visit the California Culinary Academy for lunch
    or dinner - call ahead to find out their schedule, they are sometimes
    closed for holidays, and rarely serve meals on weekends. The main
    dining room (used to be called the Careme Room, might have changed) is
    an old theater, enormous, two levels, with glassed in kitchens in the
    wings and the former stage. The food is showy and can be uneven but the
    setting is high energy - 700 chef students create a lot of buzz! It's a
    fun thing to do, close to Civic Center, the Opera and Ballet.

    These are thoughts off the top of my head, from a person who lives
    across the bay and wishes I could get to SF for pleasure more often. If
    you want an exhaustive list of what to do there with 5 year olds, ask
    me.

    Leila
     
  5. Bart D. Hull

    Bart D. Hull Guest

    Gold Spike restaurant in the North Beach district. (Italian area)

    Awesome Minestrone, great sourdough bread (duh!) and cool casual atmosphere.

    Don't forget to ride the cable cars. The one on California street is
    much easier to catch a ride on than the one that goes to Fishermans
    Wharf. (Also known as tourist alley.)

    Skip fishermans Wharf and put on some comfortable shoes. I'd walk from
    the St. Francis hotel to North Beach each evening for dinner (I LOVE
    Italian food, maybe I should find a good Italian woman.) Really cool way
    to really see the city.

    If you try to drive you'll just end up circling the block for what seems
    hours on end to find a parking space. That sucks!


    Bart D. Hull
    [email protected]
    Tempe, Arizona

    Check http://www.inficad.com/~bdhull/engine.html
    for my Subaru Engine Conversion
    Check http://www.inficad.com/~bdhull/fuselage.html
    for Tango II I'm building.

    Remove -nospam to reply via email.

    patrice wrote:
    > Hey nice folks -
    >
    > You've always given me great suggestions in the past...so I figured I'd
    > imposed again:
    >
    > The spouse and I are going to San Francisco on March 19th, for a week.
    > Could you guys suggest wonderful places to eat?
    > Spouse will eat most anything. I don't eat meat but will eat seafood.
    > While on trips we both enjoy eating at restaurants that are frequented
    > by locals.
    >
    > And as long as I've got your attention....can you guys recommend things
    > to see and do? I was out there once 17 years ago - what I remember the
    > most, was just how beautiful is. Since we aren't planning on renting a
    > car - unless you folks suggest that maybe we should - tours might be the
    > way to go to see the sights. I've noticed that there are many many
    > tours available - but I have no clue as to which are the better ones.
    > They all appear to have great marketing folks working for them.
    >
    > As always - thank you all very much in advance.
    >
    > patrice
    >
     
  6. patrice wrote:
    > Hey nice folks -
    >
    > You've always given me great suggestions in the past...so I figured

    I'd
    > imposed again:
    >
    > The spouse and I are going to San Francisco on March 19th, for a

    week.
    > Could you guys suggest wonderful places to eat?
    > Spouse will eat most anything. I don't eat meat but will eat seafood.


    > While on trips we both enjoy eating at restaurants that are

    frequented
    > by locals. <snip>


    One of the best guides for Bay Area restaurants can be found at
    www.sfgate.com, the site for the SF Chronicle. There is one section
    entitled "The 100 Best Restaurants" which identifies restaurants in
    different price ranges, cuisine, ethnicity.

    Mac
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, patrice
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The spouse and I are going to San Francisco on March 19th, for a week.
    > Could you guys suggest wonderful places to eat?


    Ask at rec.food.restaurants
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Sweet Potato Follies added 2/24/05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
  8. Ginny Sher

    Ginny Sher Guest

    On Sat, 12 Mar 2005 05:09:30 GMT, patrice <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Hey nice folks -
    >
    >You've always given me great suggestions in the past...so I figured I'd
    >imposed again:
    >
    >The spouse and I are going to San Francisco on March 19th, for a week.
    >Could you guys suggest wonderful places to eat?
    >Spouse will eat most anything. I don't eat meat but will eat seafood.
    >While on trips we both enjoy eating at restaurants that are frequented
    >by locals.
    >
    >And as long as I've got your attention....can you guys recommend things
    >to see and do? I was out there once 17 years ago - what I remember the
    >most, was just how beautiful is. Since we aren't planning on renting a
    >car - unless you folks suggest that maybe we should - tours might be the
    >way to go to see the sights. I've noticed that there are many many
    >tours available - but I have no clue as to which are the better ones.
    >They all appear to have great marketing folks working for them.
    >
    >As always - thank you all very much in advance.
    >
    >patrice


    It's been many years, but I thought the tour of Alcatraz island was
    excellent and offers a view of the city you don't always see.

    Ginny
     
  9. Neil

    Neil Guest

    The best Spanish (actually Catalan) restaurant I've visited in the U.S.
    is in the San Francisco financial district. It has the unassuming name
    "B44", perhaps to get you to remember its address, 44 Belden Place. It
    has many all-seafood dishes--cod, monkfish--and an attractive interior.
    My favorite was the cuttlefish-based arroz negro.
    Phone: 415/986-6287

    Neil
     
  10. I'll second Leila's excellent list and I'll add a couple more things.
    If you get tired of SF's ultra-trendy restaurants and want something a
    little more traditional go to Swan's Oyster Depot for oysters, shrimp
    cocktails, etc. Don't miss SF's oldest eatery, the Tadich Grill for
    charcoal-broiled fish and old fashioned ambience (and that goes for
    Sam's Grill). For steaks with an Italian-American accent, go to
    Alfred's. If you enjoy modern art, the SF Museum of Modern Art is a
    must. You should also experience the newly rehabbed Ferry Bldg., now a
    food court and then ride the J line vintage street cars to the Maritme
    Museum at Aquatic Park. You can grab a cable back to downtown from
    there. I f you have time , take a ferry to Sausalito, Angel Island, or
    Oakland. The Oakland Museum is worth the trip. And then there's the
    New Deal era murals in Coit Tower on Telegraph Hill along with it's
    great views. And much, much more..

    Enjoy-
    D.M.
     
  11. Leila

    Leila Guest

    Agreed on Alcatraz. Not something I would have chosen to do, but I was
    escorting out of town adolescents who'd seen the movie (this was 9
    years ago). Really worth the trip. I hear they have a "gardens of
    Alcatraz" tour now, featuring naturalized roses and geraniums and weird
    hardy perennials from the days when prison guards & wives kept gardens.

    If you care about museums then of course get to the Palace of Legion of
    Honor; also the Asian Art Museum in Civic Center has a world class
    collection of Asian art.

    The Ferry building is a must for foodies, any day but of course
    Saturday includes the Farmers' Market. THere's another market on
    Tuesdays *I think*. And Wednesdays in Civic Center (that one serves the
    Asian community more and has interesting veggies you won't see at the
    Ferry Building)

    Go to any good bookstore or library branch in SF and look at Patricia
    Unterman's "Food Lover's Guide to San Francisco" for more ideas once
    you get there.

    Then there's the whole ice cream thing. Local SF types - can you advise
    on ice cream? I know there's a great place in the Mission that features
    red bean and green tea and mango ice creams, home made; there's one out
    in the Richmond, too, where the proprietor is an obsessive Japanese
    immigrant who makes and packs amazing flavors by hand. Heck if I
    remember names or locations. I do like the one at the corner of Union
    and Hyde Streets, where the Union STreet bus meets the cable car line -
    what's the name of that one? It's been so long...The ice cream parlor
    at the top of the world.

    For coffee: I like Peet's. Branches everywhere.

    If you're in Golden Gate park (eastern end) and get hungry, you can
    either go north to Geary and the ethnic restaurants along there (I
    don't know them enough to recommend) or you can go south to Irving @
    ninth and surrounding blocks, where there is a strip of restaurants and
    bookstores with outposts or originators in the East Bay. As an
    Oaklander I always feel at home on Irving Street - Naan-n-Curry, great
    tandoori, naan and Indo-Pakistani food; Peet's coffee; Black Oak Books;
    a bakery, a really good MIddle Eastern kebab-n-tabbouli place, lots of
    other ethnic restaurants.

    Leila
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    Leila <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Agreed on Alcatraz. Not something I would have chosen to do, but
    >I was escorting out of town adolescents who'd seen the movie
    >(this was 9 years ago). Really worth the trip.


    But if you want to do it, call and make reservations *NOW*.
    It's likely already too late. (I tried to do the Alcatraz
    thing when my parents were here; there were no slots
    available until after they'd left.)


    --
    Yes, I am the last man to have walked on the moon, | Mike Van Pelt
    and that's a very dubious and disappointing honor. | mvp.at.calweb.com
    It's been far too long. -- Gene Cernan | KE6BVH
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Leila" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Then there's the whole ice cream thing. Local SF types - can you advise
    > on ice cream? I know there's a great place in the Mission that features
    > red bean and green tea and mango ice creams, home made;


    Probably Mitchell's.

    marcella
     
  14. patrice

    patrice Guest

    Leila wrote:
    > You should check out chowhound.com for restaurant ideas. They are more
    > active than ba.food and you'll see lots of reviews and suggestions.
    > We're not into high rent restaurants particularly, although we did have
    > a memorable meal at Fringale, a bistro South of Market that the French
    > chefs at the Culinary Academy adore. The food was delicious, the
    > service correct but friendly, the atmosphere relaxed.
    >
    > As for what to do for a week - go to the California Historical Society
    > and get a book of walking tours of San Francisco. Get a bus pass and
    > ride cable cars and busses for a day. Take a foodie walking tour of
    > Chinatown (I mean to do that myself one of these days). Go to the
    > Saturday farmer's market at the Ferry BUilding, natch. Ride the ferry
    > to Tiburon or Sausalito.
    >
    > I like walking around Russian Hill, North Beach, Cow Hollow, Pacific
    > Heights - but the neighborhoods are too numerous to name. Recently we
    > popped into the SF Art Institute on Russian Hill at about 9 pm on a
    > Saturday night, wandered around the edges of a truly fabulous rooftop
    > wedding, wandered through the halls to a courtyard with a Moorish
    > fountain, looked at art in studios and galleries, gazed at the
    > sparkling lights on the Bay from the roof. It's a special place, and
    > the cafeteria (great views) is open to the public. The whole thing is
    > open to the public, seemingly all night long. Don't know how they do
    > it.
    >
    > You'll want to go to Muir Woods, and if you do rent a car for the day,
    > wander the Marin headlands maybe, or take a bus out there and do it on
    > foot or by bike (warning you, it's not for amateurs).
    >
    > A tour to Sonoma would be nice (I prefer it to Napa, Sonoma town is old
    > and walkable and quaint, the winery scene not so vast and honky tonk as
    > Napa) so you don't have to do the driving, if you're tasting.
    >
    > Don't forget to check out the Mission - including Valencia and other
    > nearby streets - active restaurant scene, including various Spanish and
    > South American restaurants. Mariachis wander at night, playing for
    > tips. I lived in NYC in the old days so I don't find the Mission
    > daunting but be aware that it's very urban and has lots of street
    > people.
    >
    > Ethnic food I like: fast tandoor and curry places like Naan n Curry or
    > Pakwan - these are local "chains" with several branches; Vietnamese
    > sandwich shops and restaurants in the Tenderloin. But chowhound folks
    > have more knowledge than I do.
    >
    > You may find it fun to visit the California Culinary Academy for lunch
    > or dinner - call ahead to find out their schedule, they are sometimes
    > closed for holidays, and rarely serve meals on weekends. The main
    > dining room (used to be called the Careme Room, might have changed) is
    > an old theater, enormous, two levels, with glassed in kitchens in the
    > wings and the former stage. The food is showy and can be uneven but the
    > setting is high energy - 700 chef students create a lot of buzz! It's a
    > fun thing to do, close to Civic Center, the Opera and Ballet.
    >
    > These are thoughts off the top of my head, from a person who lives
    > across the bay and wishes I could get to SF for pleasure more often. If
    > you want an exhaustive list of what to do there with 5 year olds, ask
    > me.
    >
    > Leila
    >


    Wow Leila!
    Thank you so much!

    What terriffic suggestions!
    I'm going to go play at chowhound.com (I've never visited there before).
    Since I've finally become part of the digital generation (I love my
    Digital Rebel), it looks like there won't be a shortage of photo ops.

    Great art with a great view (the SF Art Institute) sounds like a gem.
    Oh the CCA for lunch - how fun!

    Since I've done zero preparation - other than the hotel and airline
    tickets - this is a treat!

    Um, pass on the list of what to do with 5 year olds (thanks for the
    offer though!). All our kids are quite furry and have a sitter take
    care of them while we're away. And no, we're not a family of
    werewolves. (wink)

    patrice
     
  15. patrice

    patrice Guest

    Bart D. Hull wrote:

    > Gold Spike restaurant in the North Beach district. (Italian area)
    >
    > Awesome Minestrone, great sourdough bread (duh!) and cool casual
    > atmosphere.
    >
    > Don't forget to ride the cable cars. The one on California street is
    > much easier to catch a ride on than the one that goes to Fishermans
    > Wharf. (Also known as tourist alley.)
    >
    > Skip fishermans Wharf and put on some comfortable shoes. I'd walk from
    > the St. Francis hotel to North Beach each evening for dinner (I LOVE
    > Italian food, maybe I should find a good Italian woman.) Really cool way
    > to really see the city.
    >
    > If you try to drive you'll just end up circling the block for what seems
    > hours on end to find a parking space. That sucks!
    >
    >
    > Bart D. Hull


    Thank you Bart!

    Gold Spike sounds great! (coming from a good, most Italian woman).

    I remember Fisherman's Wharf from my one trip out there 18 years ago -
    lots of bumping into other tourists. I remember the area being pretty
    though.

    I need to find out how far we are from the St. Francis. (just a cable
    car's ride away I bet).

    Looks like a rental car of a day trip north might be the way to go.

    Thanks again!

    patrice
     
  16. patrice

    patrice Guest

    <snip>
    >
    > One of the best guides for Bay Area restaurants can be found at
    > www.sfgate.com, the site for the SF Chronicle. There is one section
    > entitled "The 100 Best Restaurants" which identifies restaurants in
    > different price ranges, cuisine, ethnicity.
    >
    > Mac




    Thanks for the info - I'll go look.
    patrice
     
  17. patrice

    patrice Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, patrice
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The spouse and I are going to San Francisco on March 19th, for a week.
    >>Could you guys suggest wonderful places to eat?

    >
    >
    > Ask at rec.food.restaurants


    Thanks - I haven't looked there in years.

    'preciate it.


    patrice
     
  18. patrice

    patrice Guest

    <snip>
    >
    > It's been many years, but I thought the tour of Alcatraz island was
    > excellent and offers a view of the city you don't always see.
    >
    > Ginny


    I went there on my one trip to SF, 18 or so years ago.
    I really enjoyed the audio tour - kept getting turned around and
    completely off track, but enjoyed it nonetheless. I'd forgotten how
    much I'd enjoyed the view from island. I hope to go back there.

    Thanks -

    patrice
     
  19. patrice

    patrice Guest

    Neil wrote:

    > The best Spanish (actually Catalan) restaurant I've visited in the U.S.
    > is in the San Francisco financial district. It has the unassuming name
    > "B44", perhaps to get you to remember its address, 44 Belden Place. It
    > has many all-seafood dishes--cod, monkfish--and an attractive interior.
    > My favorite was the cuttlefish-based arroz negro.
    > Phone: 415/986-6287
    >
    > Neil
    >


    I've never been to a Catalan restaurant - sounds great.
    Spouse teaches Spanish, maybe we can use this as a tax write off (maybe
    not).
    Thanks for providing the address and phone # too.

    patrice
     
  20. patrice

    patrice Guest

    D.A.Martinich wrote:

    > I'll second Leila's excellent list and I'll add a couple more things.
    > If you get tired of SF's ultra-trendy restaurants and want something a
    > little more traditional go to Swan's Oyster Depot for oysters, shrimp
    > cocktails, etc. Don't miss SF's oldest eatery, the Tadich Grill for
    > charcoal-broiled fish and old fashioned ambience (and that goes for
    > Sam's Grill). For steaks with an Italian-American accent, go to
    > Alfred's. If you enjoy modern art, the SF Museum of Modern Art is a
    > must. You should also experience the newly rehabbed Ferry Bldg., now a
    > food court and then ride the J line vintage street cars to the Maritme
    > Museum at Aquatic Park. You can grab a cable back to downtown from
    > there. I f you have time , take a ferry to Sausalito, Angel Island, or
    > Oakland. The Oakland Museum is worth the trip. And then there's the
    > New Deal era murals in Coit Tower on Telegraph Hill along with it's
    > great views. And much, much more..
    >
    > Enjoy-
    > D.M.
    >



    Since I live in a land locked area, (third coast or not, Dallas is not
    coastal), I just can't bring myself to order raw oysters around here.
    I'm looking forward to trying out your suggestions.

    All your suggestions looks great - thanks!

    patrice
     
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