san sebastian - tv in basque

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by David N. Welton, Aug 9, 2003.

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  2. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    David N. Welton wrote:
    > Boogerd crashed on the Jaizkibel descent. Didn't look bad though, and I think he's back with
    > the group.

    Cyclingnews agrees with you that it was Boogerd, but French Eurosport was reporting that it was
    Rasmussen who crashed. I didn't quite look like Boogerd to me, either, but it's not like he's been
    to my house for pizza or anything.

    Bettini was way too powerful. He was the one who whittled the group down to 10 on the Jaizibel, he
    was the one who made the decisive break on the final hill to drop Casagrande, and he was the one
    doing the work to stay away. He was so dominating that it took away all the suspense. Very
    impressive.
     
  3. Davide Tosi

    Davide Tosi Guest

    "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Bettini was way too powerful. He was the one who whittled the group down to 10 on the Jaizibel, he
    >was the one who made the decisive break on the final hill to drop Casagrande, and he was the one
    >doing the work to stay away. He was so dominating that it took away all the suspense. Very
    >impressive.

    Once Paolo did the selection on the Jaizkibel, he was about sure to won. He remained with a bunch of
    "eternal runner-ups" who will never manage to beat someone with the class of the "californian" even
    if they challenge him in 100 races in a row.
     
  4. Kyle Legate

    Kyle Legate Guest

    Robert Chung wrote:
    >
    > Bettini was way too powerful. He was the one who whittled the group down to 10 on the Jaizibel, he
    > was the one who made the decisive break on the final hill to drop Casagrande, and he was the one
    > doing the work to stay away. He was so dominating that it took away all the suspense. Very
    > impressive.
    >
    It seems I created the suspense for myself. I was half thinking that Basso was sitting on and taking
    only 5 second pulls because the jersey was Bettini's to have, and Basso was saving his strength for
    the finish. Turns out he wasn't bluffing after all.
     
  5. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Davide Tosi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Bettini was way too powerful. He was the one who whittled the group down to 10 on the Jaizibel,
    > >he was the one who made the decisive break on the final hill to drop Casagrande, and he was the
    > >one doing the work to stay away. He was so dominating that it took away all the suspense. Very
    > >impressive.
    >
    > Once Paolo did the selection on the Jaizkibel, he was about sure to won. He remained with a bunch
    > of "eternal runner-ups" who will never manage to beat someone with the class of the "californian"
    > even if they challenge him in 100 races in a row.

    Why do you call him the "Californian"?

    -WG
     
  6. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Kyle Legate
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Robert Chung wrote:
    > >
    > > Bettini was way too powerful. He was the one who whittled the group down to 10 on the Jaizibel,
    > > he was the one who made the decisive break on the final hill to drop Casagrande, and he was the
    > > one doing the work to stay away. He was so dominating that it took away all the suspense. Very
    > > impressive.
    > >
    > It seems I created the suspense for myself. I was half thinking that Basso was sitting on and
    > taking only 5 second pulls because the jersey was Bettini's to have, and Basso was saving his
    > strength for the finish. Turns out he wasn't bluffing after all.

    Or they made a deal.

    -WG
     
  7. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    warren wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Davide Tosi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Bettini was way too powerful. He was the one who whittled the group down to 10 on the Jaizibel,
    >>> he was the one who made the decisive break on the final hill to drop Casagrande, and he was the
    >>> one doing the work to stay away. He was so dominating that it took away all the suspense. Very
    >>> impressive.
    >>
    >> Once Paolo did the selection on the Jaizkibel, he was about sure to won. He remained with a bunch
    >> of "eternal runner-ups" who will never manage to beat someone with the class of the "californian"
    >> even if they challenge him in 100 races in a row.
    >
    > Why do you call him the "Californian"?

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/riders/2003/diaries/paolo/
     
  8. Davide Tosi

    Davide Tosi Guest

    warren <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, Davide Tosi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Bettini was way too powerful. He was the one who whittled the group down to 10 on the Jaizibel,
    >> >he was the one who made the decisive break on the final hill to drop Casagrande, and he was the
    >> >one doing the work to stay away. He was so dominating that it took away all the suspense. Very
    >> >impressive.
    >>
    >> Once Paolo did the selection on the Jaizkibel, he was about sure to won. He remained with a bunch
    >> of "eternal runner-ups" who will never manage to beat someone with the class of the "californian"
    >> even if they challenge him in 100 races in a row.
    >
    >Why do you call him the "Californian"?

    He comes from an Italian place named La California
     
  9. "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> writes:

    > David N. Welton wrote:
    > > Boogerd crashed on the Jaizkibel descent. Didn't look bad though, and I think he's back with the
    > > group.

    > Cyclingnews agrees with you that it was Boogerd, but French Eurosport was reporting that it was
    > Rasmussen who crashed. I didn't quite look like Boogerd to me, either, but it's not like he's been
    > to my house for pizza or anything.

    Davide Cassani pointed out, during the RAI coverage, that Boogerd has the former-nat-champion arm
    stripes on his jersey, so it was easy to tell who it was. I was surprised those dutch guys were
    there at all with that heat.

    > Bettini was way too powerful. He was the one who whittled the group down to 10 on the Jaizibel, he
    > was the one who made the decisive break on the final hill to drop Casagrande, and he was the one
    > doing the work to stay away. He was so dominating that it took away all the suspense. Very
    > impressive.

    Yep... I think he would have put more time into the followers if he hadn't felt compelled to make
    Basso pull occassionally, which always dropped the pace.

    --
    David N. Welton Consulting: http://www.dedasys.com/ Personal: http://www.dedasys.com/davidw/ Free
    Software: http://www.dedasys.com/freesoftware/ Apache Tcl: http://tcl.apache.org/
     
  10. On Sat, 09 Aug 2003 23:15:45 GMT, David N. Welton wrote:
    >Davide Cassani pointed out, during the RAI coverage, that Boogerd has the former-nat-champion arm
    >stripes on his jersey, so it was easy to tell who it was.

    But Rasmussen had world champion stripes, from his MTB title. That may have been the cause of the
    confusion.

    >I was surprised those dutch guys were there at all with that heat.

    Rasmussen's Danish. From the Rabobank site, his hobbies: reading, movies and eating. However, also
    from that site: BMI = 19.3.
     
  11. Fred Marx

    Fred Marx Guest

    David N. Welton wrote:
    > Nah, Basso is kind of a half-ass. He is one of the 'big promises' of Italian cycling, and while he
    > does make steady improvements, he never seems to put it together for the big win, or the
    > impressive attack that would really set him apart from the rest of the field.
    >

    he did place in the top ten a TDF without the benefit of a team.... they were down to three riders.
     
  12. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

    "David N. Welton" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Nah, Basso is kind of a half-ass.

    Wow, you are hard to please.

    He is one of the 'big promises' of
    > Italian cycling, and while he does make steady improvements, he never seems to put it together for
    > the big win, or the impressive attack that would really set him apart from the rest of the field.

    You must be kidding. He seems to race all year and finishes near the front quite a bit. He is
    only in his mid 20s and I can think of a handful of superstars that had won more by his age, but
    not too many. Italy is a great place for a talent like his and I have no doubt he will continue
    to get stronger. For contrast, compare Basso to Bettini's palmares up to the age of even 28. The
    kid has it.
     
  13. Nick Burns wrote:
    > "David N. Welton" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Nah, Basso is kind of a half-ass.
    >
    >
    > Wow, you are hard to please.
    >
    >
    > He is one of the 'big promises' of
    >
    >>Italian cycling, and while he does make steady improvements, he never seems to put it together for
    >>the big win, or the impressive attack that would really set him apart from the rest of the field.
    >
    >
    > You must be kidding. He seems to race all year and finishes near the front quite a bit. He is
    > only in his mid 20s and I can think of a handful of superstars that had won more by his age, but
    > not too many. Italy is a great place for a talent like his and I have no doubt he will continue
    > to get stronger. For contrast, compare Basso to Bettini's palmares up to the age of even 28. The
    > kid has it.
    >

    Really! Just needs a good team to get the right results. Had to be tough finishing as well as he did
    in the TdF with only one other team mate left by Paris, the remainder suffering from some mysterious
    grimpeur-intestinal malady which affects italian sprinter teams when the road turns upwards.
     
  14. "Nick Burns" <[email protected]> writes:

    > "David N. Welton" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > > Nah, Basso is kind of a half-ass.

    > Wow, you are hard to please.

    Yeah, I guess that's kind of harsh:)

    > > He is one of the 'big promises' of Italian cycling, and while he does make steady improvements,
    > > he never seems to put it together for the big win, or the impressive attack that would really
    > > set him apart from the rest of the field.

    > You must be kidding. He seems to race all year and finishes near the front quite a bit. He is
    > only in his mid 20s and I can think of a handful of superstars that had won more by his age, but
    > not too many. Italy is a great place for a talent like his and I have no doubt he will continue
    > to get stronger. For contrast, compare Basso to Bettini's palmares up to the age of even 28. The
    > kid has it.

    No doubt that he has a lot of potential. I just get bored reading about him in the Italian press. I
    also dont' recollect having ever seen him ever racing very aggressively. He's strong enough to go
    with the best, but I don't get a feeling he ever takes much initiative, which all together doesn't
    make him a particularly interesting rider, from my point of view. Maybe that will change with time,
    as he comes into his own - let's hope so!

    Ciao,
    --
    David N. Welton Consulting: http://www.dedasys.com/ Personal: http://www.dedasys.com/davidw/ Free
    Software: http://www.dedasys.com/freesoftware/ Apache Tcl: http://tcl.apache.org/
     
  15. Davide Tosi

    Davide Tosi Guest

    "Nick Burns" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > He is one of the 'big promises' of
    >> Italian cycling, and while he does make steady improvements, he never seems to put it
    >> together for the big win, or the impressive attack that would really set him apart from the
    >> rest of the field.
    >
    >You must be kidding. He seems to race all year and finishes near the front quite a bit. He is
    >only in his mid 20s and I can think of a handful of superstars that had won more by his age, but
    >not too many. Italy is a great place for a talent like his and I have no doubt he will continue
    >to get stronger. For contrast, compare Basso to Bettini's palmares up to the age of even 28. The
    >kid has it.

    You are overstating him. Bettini at 28 had already won one L-B-L and a lot of minor races. Basso
    completely lacks in winning mentality. A champion to come maybe has not big wins, but is usually
    winning a lot of minor races. Basso does not fit this description, because he does not run to win,
    he runs to stay with the top of the race. This attitude usually results in lots of runner-up places.
    The next big thing of Italian cycling is Pippo Pozzato: only 21 and has already won dozens of races.
     
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