Sashimi vs. sushi quality

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by oliverluNOSPAM, Feb 19, 2004.

  1. Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher quality than used for sushi, or is
    it just cut differently and served without rice? Thanks!

    --

    "Anti-Catholicism is the anti-Semitism of liberals."--Peter Viereck
     
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  2. Bob Myers

    Bob Myers Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher quality than used for sushi, or
    > is it just cut differently and served without rice? Thanks!

    In short, the fresher the better for either; you cannot therefore say that "sashimi quality" is any
    different from "sushi quality", and Gawd knows there are plenty of bad examples of both out there...

    Bob M.
     
  3. On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 20:48:26 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    >Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher
    quality
    >than used for sushi, or is it just cut differently and served without rice? Thanks!

    FYI We in Hawaii live relatively closely to Japan--and we have a lot of Japanese influence as a
    result. The word <sashimi> means fresh raw fish. The word <sushi> means a roll of rice, with small
    bits of tastes in the very middle and covered in black dried seaweed-nori. I know <sushi> has
    evolved to become an even fancier thing with mayo, avocado, etc etc..... but its generic meaning is
    as I described. I often stifle a grin when I see people further away from Japan that we are, use the
    terms inter changeably. I agree with the post ahead of mine, you always only want the freshest fish
    whether for sashimi or in sushi. aloha, Thunder http://www.smithfarms.com Farmers & Sellers of 100%
    Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff
     
  4. John Gaquin

    John Gaquin Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:ui9Zb.587

    > Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher quality than used for sushi, or
    > is it just cut differently and served without rice? Thanks!

    My understanding from my time working in Japan years ago is that 'sashimi' denotes only the fish,
    whereas 'sushi' denotes the more formalized presentation, that may include rice, seaweed, etc.
    Neither word is a qualitative indicator.
     
  5. Kilikini

    Kilikini Guest

    "smithfarms pure kona" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 20:48:26 GMT, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > >Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher
    > quality
    > >than used for sushi, or is it just cut differently and served without rice? Thanks!
    >
    > FYI We in Hawaii live relatively closely to Japan--and we have a lot of Japanese influence as a
    > result. The word <sashimi> means fresh raw fish. The word <sushi> means a roll of rice, with small
    > bits of tastes in the very middle and covered in black dried seaweed-nori. I know <sushi> has
    > evolved to become an even fancier thing with mayo, avocado, etc etc..... but its generic meaning
    > is as I described. I often stifle a grin when I see people further away from Japan that we are,
    > use the terms inter changeably. I agree with the post ahead of mine, you always only want the
    > freshest fish whether for sashimi or in sushi. aloha, Thunder http://www.smithfarms.com Farmers &
    > Sellers of 100% Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff

    I'm drooling for fresh Ahi sashimi now, mahalo Thunder. May have to hit Foodland for a
    block.........Yummmmmmmmmmmm! kili
     
  6. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "smithfarms pure kona" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 20:48:26 GMT, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > >Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher
    > quality
    > >than used for sushi, or is it just cut differently and served without rice? Thanks!
    >
    > FYI We in Hawaii live relatively closely to Japan--and we have a lot of Japanese influence as a
    > result. The word <sashimi> means fresh raw fish. The word <sushi> means a roll of rice, with small
    > bits of tastes in the very middle and covered in black dried seaweed-nori.

    That's not quite correct. The term sushi refers specifically to the vinegared rice. It may be served
    in a roll as you describe, but there are many other ways of serving it.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  7. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "John Gaquin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message news:ui9Zb.587
    >
    > > Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher quality than used for sushi, or
    > > is it just cut differently and served without rice? Thanks!
    >
    > My understanding from my time working in Japan years ago is that
    'sashimi'
    > denotes only the fish, whereas 'sushi' denotes the more formalized presentation, that may include
    > rice, seaweed, etc. Neither word is a qualitative indicator.
    >
    >

    "Sushi" refers specifically to the vinegared rice. You cannot have sushi without rice.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  8. "smithfarms pure kona" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    >
    > FYI We in Hawaii live relatively closely to Japan--and we have a lot of Japanese influence as a
    > result. The word <sashimi> means fresh raw fish. The word <sushi> means a roll of rice, with small
    > bits of tastes in the very middle and covered in black dried seaweed-nori.

    That type of sushi (rolled with nori on the outside, cylindrical in shape) is specifically called
    maki-zushi. The kind you roll yourself (nori on the outside, conical in shape) is te-maki-zushi. The
    kind that most people think of as sushi (rice on the bottom, a bit of wasabi, fish/egg/whatever on
    top) is nigiri-zushi (except for ikura or uni, which has nori on the outside, but is not rolled like
    maki-zushi). Futomaki-zushi is long, wide maki-zushi that is not sliced. Then there's chirashi-zushi
    which is a whole other topic (imo).

    As for the word 'sushi', the actual kanji (Chinese characters) has nothing to do with fish or rice
    at all. IIRC, the character usually used for 'su' commonly means 'longevity' and I can't remember
    what 'shi' means, but not rice or fish or vinegar. There are other variations for writing 'sushi'
    which do involve 'fish' in the meaning, but not the most commonly seen one (which is at the bottom
    of http://member.nifty.ne.jp/maryy/eng/sushi_kanji.htm ). The kanji for sashimi has nothing to do
    with fish, either. The best site I've seen with definitions of different types of sushi and sashimi
    is at http://www.4japan.info/Food%20-%20sushi.htm . You may have to go to www.4japan.info first,
    then click on food, then sushi/sashimi.

    rona
    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the inconvenience!***
     
  9. On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 19:09:43 -0500, "John Gaquin"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message news:ui9Zb.587
    >
    >> Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher
    quality
    >> than used for sushi, or is it just cut differently and served
    without
    >> rice? Thanks!
    >
    >My understanding from my time working in Japan years ago is that
    'sashimi'
    >denotes only the fish, whereas 'sushi' denotes the more formalized presentation, that may include
    >rice, seaweed, etc. Neither word is a qualitative indicator.
    >

    We agree on the common words:) indeed. aloha, Thunder http://www.smithfarms.com Farmers & Sellers of
    100% Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff
     
  10. Alzelt

    Alzelt Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher quality than used for sushi, or
    > is it just cut differently and served without rice? Thanks!
    >
    In all sushi bars that I visit in Seattle, quality is same (cut from same fish). Just cut
    differently.
    --
    Alan

    "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion, and avoid the people, you might bet-
    ter stay home."
    -- James Michener
     
  11. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 20:48:26 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    >Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher quality than used for sushi, or is
    >it just cut differently and served without rice?

    No and yes. So-called 'sushi grade' has about the same significance as 'organic' used to. It simply
    means either very fresh or very quickly frozen after catching. Since sashimi is raw fish, and sushi
    often *includes* raw fish, you want the highest quality possible for both.
     
  12. Kilikini

    Kilikini Guest

    "Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 20:48:26 GMT, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > >Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher quality than used for sushi, or
    > >is it just cut differently and served without rice?
    >
    > No and yes. So-called 'sushi grade' has about the same significance as 'organic' used to. It
    > simply means either very fresh or very quickly frozen after catching. Since sashimi is raw fish,
    > and sushi often *includes* raw fish, you want the highest quality possible for both.

    But there is a specific cut of the fish that's used for sushi and sashimi. For instance, you
    wouldn't want to use the stringy belly of an Ahi for sashimi and you also don't want to use the dark
    dark blood red part of the fish. You want the cleanest, clearest part, sliced just *so* thin. It
    melts in your mouth then. No need fo' chew!

    kili
     
  13. Bob Myers

    Bob Myers Guest

    "John Gaquin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message news:ui9Zb.587
    >
    > > Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher quality than used for sushi, or
    > > is it just cut differently and served without rice? Thanks!
    >
    > My understanding from my time working in Japan years ago is that
    'sashimi'
    > denotes only the fish, whereas 'sushi' denotes the more formalized presentation, that may include
    > rice, seaweed, etc. Neither word is a qualitative indicator.

    Not quite. In terms of how the words themselves are distinguished, "sashimi" refers to raw fish,
    served by itself. "Sushi" actually has nothing to do with whether or not there is fish in the dish,
    but rather means that it is based on a particular sort of vinegared rice. Raw fish IS a popular
    sushi ingredient, but it's hardly the only sort of thing served as "sushi."

    Bob M.
     
  14. Chyabo

    Chyabo Guest

    Original mean of "su" is vinegar. "Susi" is an Japanese classic word (adjective) that mean
    sour or acid.

    "Rona Yuthasastrakosol" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > As for the word 'sushi', the actual kanji (Chinese characters) has nothing to do with fish or rice
    > at all. IIRC, the character usually used for 'su' commonly means 'longevity' and I can't remember
    > what 'shi' means, but not rice or fish or vinegar. There are other variations for writing 'sushi'
     
  15. "chyabo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Original mean of "su" is vinegar. "Susi" is an Japanese classic word (adjective) that mean sour
    > or acid.
    >

    One meaning of 'su' is vinegar, but the kanji most commonly used for 'sushi' does not mean vinegar.
    The 'su' kanji that is part of 'su-shi', iirc, is kotobuki. It means longevity, as you probably
    know. Here's the kanji to which I am referring
    http://www.gahoh.com/movie/jouyoukanji/jou_07kaku/ju3C77.html .

    rona

    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the inconvenience!***
     
  16. Sb

    Sb Guest

    "John Gaquin" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > 'sushi' denotes the more formalized presentation, that may include rice, seaweed, etc.

    I, as a Japanese, feel it a quite interesting understanding. The English term "sushi" means "Edomae-
    zushi", "Nigiri-zushi". Its originated ralatively recent, in Edo-era. Initially, "sushi" was a fast
    food like McDonald hanburger or hot-dog. No conservative Japanese restaurant in Kyoto serve "suishi"
    as formal presentation.
     
  17. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "SB" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "John Gaquin" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > > 'sushi' denotes the more formalized presentation, that may include rice, seaweed, etc.
    >
    > I, as a Japanese, feel it a quite interesting understanding. The English term "sushi" means "Edomae-
    > zushi", "Nigiri-zushi". Its originated ralatively recent, in Edo-era. Initially, "sushi" was a
    > fast food like McDonald hanburger or hot-dog. No conservative Japanese restaurant in Kyoto serve
    > "suishi" as formal presentation.
    >

    Wow, this is funny. ;-) My papasan spent 4 years in Japan when he was in the air force... He's told
    me many times that he found the term "sushi" amusing because it meant "fast food"...

    He taught me to adore Sashimi but damn it's expensive!

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  18. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 13:21:43 GMT, "kilikini"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 20:48:26 GMT, [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >> >Is the fish used for sashimi by definition (or usually) a higher quality than used for sushi, or
    >> >is it just cut differently and served without rice?

    >But there is a specific cut of the fish that's used for sushi and sashimi. For instance, you
    >wouldn't want to use the stringy belly of an Ahi for sashimi and you also don't want to use the
    >dark dark blood red part of the fish. You want the cleanest, clearest part, sliced just *so* thin.
    >It melts in your mouth then. No need fo' chew!

    The OP was asking if there was one *quality* of fish used for sushi and another for sashimi. I
    pointed out they both were composed (in part, in the case of sushi) raw fish, and that the same
    quality would be desirable for both preparations. Or lack of. :) I believe the question he raised
    with regard to "cut" wasn't asking about if these were cut from different parts of the fish, but
    what shape/size the pieces for the final product were. I could be wrong.
     
  19. Chyabo

    Chyabo Guest

    "Rona Yuthasastrakosol" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "chyabo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Original mean of "su" is vinegar. "Susi" is an Japanese classic word (adjective) that mean sour
    > > or acid.
    > >
    >
    > One meaning of 'su' is vinegar, but the kanji most commonly used for 'sushi' does not mean
    > vinegar. The 'su' kanji that is part of 'su-shi', iirc, is kotobuki. It means longevity, as you
    > probably know. Here's the kanji to which I am referring
    > http://www.gahoh.com/movie/jouyoukanji/jou_07kaku/ju3C77.html .

    That Kanji character is a phonetic equivalent.
     
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