Sausage ?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by ~patches~, Oct 4, 2005.

  1. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on
    the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see
    before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could
    still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?
     
    Tags:


  2. On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 07:58:03 -0400, ~patches~
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on
    >the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see
    >before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could
    >still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?

    If you are making Summer Sausage you must use a cure. If you do not
    have a smoker, you can add a small amount of liquid smoke to the mix,
    set your oven on its lowest setting (probably about 170 degrees) and
    heat the sausage to an interior temperature of 145 degrees. This info
    comes from The Sausage Makers book. The Sausage Maker is in Buffalo,
    NY and has a good website. Also Con Yeager Spice has an online 16
    page instruction booklet on this topic.I usually make about 50,lbs of
    summer sausage a year and have made it with and without the use of a
    smoker.
     
  3. On Tue 04 Oct 2005 04:58:03a, ~patches~ wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on
    > the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see
    > before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could
    > still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?
    >


    Yes. If you can maintain a 225 degree temp. You can also add some soaked
    wood chips in a foil pan or smoker box which would help produce the desired
    flavor.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________

    http://tinypic.com/dzijap.jpg

    Popie-In-The-Bowl
     
  4. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Allan Matthews wrote:

    > On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 07:58:03 -0400, ~patches~
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on
    >>the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see
    >>before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could
    >>still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?

    >
    > If you are making Summer Sausage you must use a cure. If you do not
    > have a smoker, you can add a small amount of liquid smoke to the mix,
    > set your oven on its lowest setting (probably about 170 degrees) and
    > heat the sausage to an interior temperature of 145 degrees. This info
    > comes from The Sausage Makers book. The Sausage Maker is in Buffalo,
    > NY and has a good website. Also Con Yeager Spice has an online 16
    > page instruction booklet on this topic.I usually make about 50,lbs of
    > summer sausage a year and have made it with and without the use of a
    > smoker.
    >

    Thanks for your help Allan. One further question - do you cover the
    sausage when making it in the oven? TIA
     
  5. On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 10:36:59 -0400, ~patches~
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Allan Matthews wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 07:58:03 -0400, ~patches~
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on
    >>>the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see
    >>>before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could
    >>>still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?

    >>
    >> If you are making Summer Sausage you must use a cure. If you do not
    >> have a smoker, you can add a small amount of liquid smoke to the mix,
    >> set your oven on its lowest setting (probably about 170 degrees) and
    >> heat the sausage to an interior temperature of 145 degrees. This info
    >> comes from The Sausage Makers book. The Sausage Maker is in Buffalo,
    >> NY and has a good website. Also Con Yeager Spice has an online 16
    >> page instruction booklet on this topic.I usually make about 50,lbs of
    >> summer sausage a year and have made it with and without the use of a
    >> smoker.
    >>

    >Thanks for your help Allan. One further question - do you cover the
    >sausage when making it in the oven? TIA


    Summer sausage is packed in a fibrous casing, about 75 mm in diameter
    (2 1/2 inches or so) and 20-24 inches long. Take a look at Con Yeager
    Spice website and download their booklet so you can see what you are
    dealing with in summer sausage. It is not a fresh sausage but a cured
    one. I make it from venison and pork trimmings and in this area
    summer sausage is made quite a bit.
     
  6. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Allan Matthews wrote:

    > On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 10:36:59 -0400, ~patches~
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Allan Matthews wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 07:58:03 -0400, ~patches~
    >>><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on
    >>>>the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see
    >>>>before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could
    >>>>still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?
    >>>
    >>>If you are making Summer Sausage you must use a cure. If you do not
    >>>have a smoker, you can add a small amount of liquid smoke to the mix,
    >>>set your oven on its lowest setting (probably about 170 degrees) and
    >>>heat the sausage to an interior temperature of 145 degrees. This info
    >>>comes from The Sausage Makers book. The Sausage Maker is in Buffalo,
    >>>NY and has a good website. Also Con Yeager Spice has an online 16
    >>>page instruction booklet on this topic.I usually make about 50,lbs of
    >>>summer sausage a year and have made it with and without the use of a
    >>>smoker.
    >>>

    >>
    >>Thanks for your help Allan. One further question - do you cover the
    >>sausage when making it in the oven? TIA

    >
    >
    > Summer sausage is packed in a fibrous casing, about 75 mm in diameter
    > (2 1/2 inches or so) and 20-24 inches long. Take a look at Con Yeager
    > Spice website and download their booklet so you can see what you are
    > dealing with in summer sausage. It is not a fresh sausage but a cured
    > one. I make it from venison and pork trimmings and in this area
    > summer sausage is made quite a bit.
    >

    Ok, thanks very much for your help. I'll check out their website. I
    have the spices and the cure so I will have to pick up the casings. DH
    is doing this bonding thing with the guys shortly and if they are lucky
    I will have venison. I've been looking for ways to use it and thought
    summer sausage would be good.
     
  7. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    ~patches~ wrote:
    > I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on
    > the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see
    > before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could
    > still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?



    Are you making fermented summer sausage? You can get a lactic acid
    starter culture here: <http://www.butcher-packer.com/pg_sausage_culture.htm>

    I bought a packet of the LHP starter a few years ago and store it in the
    deep freezer. Butcher-packer.com is also a good place to buy casings,
    cure, spices, etc.

    Even though I have some collagen and natural casings, I think the next
    salami I make will be stuffed in homemade cloth (muslin) casings just to
    see how that works.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  8. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    zxcvbob wrote:

    > ~patches~ wrote:
    >
    >> I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions
    >> on the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to
    >> see before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I
    >> could still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?

    >
    >
    >
    > Are you making fermented summer sausage? You can get a lactic acid
    > starter culture here:
    > <http://www.butcher-packer.com/pg_sausage_culture.htm>
    >
    > I bought a packet of the LHP starter a few years ago and store it in the
    > deep freezer. Butcher-packer.com is also a good place to buy casings,
    > cure, spices, etc.
    >
    > Even though I have some collagen and natural casings, I think the next
    > salami I make will be stuffed in homemade cloth (muslin) casings just to
    > see how that works.
    >
    > Best regards,
    > Bob

    I'm not really sure but I don't think so. One pack is Luhr-Jensen
    Smokehouse Summer Sausage that includes the cure and spices. The other
    is Spice n slice Country Style breakfast sausage. The LJS calls for
    smoking whereas the other only takes few minutes to make. I've only
    made sausage once before and that was the party sausge recipe in Jean
    Pare's Preserving cookbook. It was ok but nothing I would make again.
    I got the spice & cure packets in anticipation of the venison DH hopes
    to bring home. If they are unsuccessful I can always use ground beef &
    pork. Thanks for the website, I'm checking it out as soon as it loads.
    How big would you make the muslin casings?
     
  9. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    ~patches~ wrote:
    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >> ~patches~ wrote:
    >>
    >>> I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions
    >>> on the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to
    >>> see before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I
    >>> could still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Are you making fermented summer sausage? You can get a lactic acid
    >> starter culture here:
    >> <http://www.butcher-packer.com/pg_sausage_culture.htm>
    >>
    >> I bought a packet of the LHP starter a few years ago and store it in
    >> the deep freezer. Butcher-packer.com is also a good place to buy
    >> casings, cure, spices, etc.
    >>
    >> Even though I have some collagen and natural casings, I think the next
    >> salami I make will be stuffed in homemade cloth (muslin) casings just
    >> to see how that works.
    >>
    >> Best regards,
    >> Bob

    >
    > I'm not really sure but I don't think so. One pack is Luhr-Jensen
    > Smokehouse Summer Sausage that includes the cure and spices. The other
    > is Spice n slice Country Style breakfast sausage. The LJS calls for
    > smoking whereas the other only takes few minutes to make. I've only
    > made sausage once before and that was the party sausge recipe in Jean
    > Pare's Preserving cookbook. It was ok but nothing I would make again. I
    > got the spice & cure packets in anticipation of the venison DH hopes to
    > bring home. If they are unsuccessful I can always use ground beef &
    > pork. Thanks for the website, I'm checking it out as soon as it loads.
    > How big would you make the muslin casings?



    About 3" diameter and 18" to 24" long.

    Here's what I used last time I made salami (about a year ago.) Notice
    that it is eaten raw. This recipe is a work-in-progress, and I think I
    liked it better when I used 8 grams of nutmeg instead of the coriander.

    Brisket is not really a good choice because it doesn't bind well and
    it's a little too fatty, but it's the only inexpensive meat I can get
    that is not pumped full of water and phosphates -- excuse me, "enhanced
    with up to 15% flavor solution".

    I have a bag of Cure #1, but I haven't finished using up that bag of
    Tenderquick yet so that's what I'm using until it's gone. Then I'll
    change the recipes to use salt and cure.

    I've also fermented the meat before in pans in the oven with the oven
    light on for warmth.

    * * *

    Beef Salami #3

    10 pounds beef brisket
    90 grams Mortons Tender Quick
    30 grams dextrose
    25 grams black pepper
    30 grams dry mustard powder
    15 grams coriander seed
    2 tsp garlic powder
    1 cup dry milk powder
    1/4 tsp lactic starter culture for meat
    1/4 cup warm water, preferably distilled

    Coarsely grind the black pepper and coriander seeds (and finely grind
    the mustard seeds) if using whole spices. Cut up meat into small chunks
    like stew meat. Mix the Tender Quick, dextrose, spices, milk powder
    into the meat. Chill until almost frozen. Grind with a 3/16" plate.
    Dissolve starter culture in water and sprinkle over meat mixture and mix
    thoroughly. Stuff into beef middles or extra large hog casings. Hang
    at 90 to 100 F. to ferment overnight or up to 24 hours. Move to cool
    damp place to hang and dry to about 70% original weight.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  10. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    zxcvbob wrote:

    > ~patches~ wrote:
    >
    >> zxcvbob wrote:
    >>
    >>> ~patches~ wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions
    >>>> on the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected
    >>>> to see before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way
    >>>> I could still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Are you making fermented summer sausage? You can get a lactic acid
    >>> starter culture here:
    >>> <http://www.butcher-packer.com/pg_sausage_culture.htm>
    >>>
    >>> I bought a packet of the LHP starter a few years ago and store it in
    >>> the deep freezer. Butcher-packer.com is also a good place to buy
    >>> casings, cure, spices, etc.
    >>>
    >>> Even though I have some collagen and natural casings, I think the
    >>> next salami I make will be stuffed in homemade cloth (muslin) casings
    >>> just to see how that works.
    >>>
    >>> Best regards,
    >>> Bob

    >>
    >>
    >> I'm not really sure but I don't think so. One pack is Luhr-Jensen
    >> Smokehouse Summer Sausage that includes the cure and spices. The
    >> other is Spice n slice Country Style breakfast sausage. The LJS calls
    >> for smoking whereas the other only takes few minutes to make. I've
    >> only made sausage once before and that was the party sausge recipe in
    >> Jean Pare's Preserving cookbook. It was ok but nothing I would make
    >> again. I got the spice & cure packets in anticipation of the venison
    >> DH hopes to bring home. If they are unsuccessful I can always use
    >> ground beef & pork. Thanks for the website, I'm checking it out as
    >> soon as it loads. How big would you make the muslin casings?

    >
    >
    >
    > About 3" diameter and 18" to 24" long.
    >
    > Here's what I used last time I made salami (about a year ago.) Notice
    > that it is eaten raw. This recipe is a work-in-progress, and I think I
    > liked it better when I used 8 grams of nutmeg instead of the coriander.
    >
    > Brisket is not really a good choice because it doesn't bind well and
    > it's a little too fatty, but it's the only inexpensive meat I can get
    > that is not pumped full of water and phosphates -- excuse me, "enhanced
    > with up to 15% flavor solution".
    >
    > I have a bag of Cure #1, but I haven't finished using up that bag of
    > Tenderquick yet so that's what I'm using until it's gone. Then I'll
    > change the recipes to use salt and cure.
    >
    > I've also fermented the meat before in pans in the oven with the oven
    > light on for warmth.
    >
    > * * *
    >
    > Beef Salami #3
    >
    > 10 pounds beef brisket
    > 90 grams Mortons Tender Quick
    > 30 grams dextrose
    > 25 grams black pepper
    > 30 grams dry mustard powder
    > 15 grams coriander seed
    > 2 tsp garlic powder
    > 1 cup dry milk powder
    > 1/4 tsp lactic starter culture for meat
    > 1/4 cup warm water, preferably distilled
    >
    > Coarsely grind the black pepper and coriander seeds (and finely grind
    > the mustard seeds) if using whole spices. Cut up meat into small chunks
    > like stew meat. Mix the Tender Quick, dextrose, spices, milk powder
    > into the meat. Chill until almost frozen. Grind with a 3/16" plate.
    > Dissolve starter culture in water and sprinkle over meat mixture and mix
    > thoroughly. Stuff into beef middles or extra large hog casings. Hang
    > at 90 to 100 F. to ferment overnight or up to 24 hours. Move to cool
    > damp place to hang and dry to about 70% original weight.
    >
    > Best regards,
    > Bob


    Thanks Bob for the tips and recipe! I can get beef at a good discount
    when buying bulk so I certainly try this recipe. DH and the kids like
    salami sandwiches too so it will save me a bit from the high prices at
    our local m & p grocery store with miniature deli. They have very nice
    meats but limited selection and high prices. I've googled for curing
    salt and found Morton's Tender Quick. They want $7 shipping & $2.50
    handling. The Canadian division is Windsor Salt. They are a couple of
    hours from here so I sent them an info request looking for someone who
    sell it closer to me. There's a fair number of hunters around here so
    there has to be a couple of stores that sell it. This sounds like it
    will be a lot of fun experimenting.
     
  11. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    ~patches~ wrote:
    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >> ~patches~ wrote:
    >>
    >>> zxcvbob wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> ~patches~ wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The
    >>>>> instructions on the summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something
    >>>>> I neglected to see before buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there
    >>>>> another way I could still make the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set
    >>>>> to low?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Are you making fermented summer sausage? You can get a lactic acid
    >>>> starter culture here:
    >>>> <http://www.butcher-packer.com/pg_sausage_culture.htm>
    >>>>
    >>>> I bought a packet of the LHP starter a few years ago and store it in
    >>>> the deep freezer. Butcher-packer.com is also a good place to buy
    >>>> casings, cure, spices, etc.
    >>>>
    >>>> Even though I have some collagen and natural casings, I think the
    >>>> next salami I make will be stuffed in homemade cloth (muslin)
    >>>> casings just to see how that works.
    >>>>
    >>>> Best regards,
    >>>> Bob
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I'm not really sure but I don't think so. One pack is Luhr-Jensen
    >>> Smokehouse Summer Sausage that includes the cure and spices. The
    >>> other is Spice n slice Country Style breakfast sausage. The LJS
    >>> calls for smoking whereas the other only takes few minutes to make.
    >>> I've only made sausage once before and that was the party sausge
    >>> recipe in Jean Pare's Preserving cookbook. It was ok but nothing I
    >>> would make again. I got the spice & cure packets in anticipation of
    >>> the venison DH hopes to bring home. If they are unsuccessful I can
    >>> always use ground beef & pork. Thanks for the website, I'm checking
    >>> it out as soon as it loads. How big would you make the muslin casings?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> About 3" diameter and 18" to 24" long.
    >>
    >> Here's what I used last time I made salami (about a year ago.) Notice
    >> that it is eaten raw. This recipe is a work-in-progress, and I think
    >> I liked it better when I used 8 grams of nutmeg instead of the coriander.
    >>
    >> Brisket is not really a good choice because it doesn't bind well and
    >> it's a little too fatty, but it's the only inexpensive meat I can get
    >> that is not pumped full of water and phosphates -- excuse me,
    >> "enhanced with up to 15% flavor solution".
    >>
    >> I have a bag of Cure #1, but I haven't finished using up that bag of
    >> Tenderquick yet so that's what I'm using until it's gone. Then I'll
    >> change the recipes to use salt and cure.
    >>
    >> I've also fermented the meat before in pans in the oven with the oven
    >> light on for warmth.
    >>
    >> * * *
    >>
    >> Beef Salami #3
    >>
    >> 10 pounds beef brisket
    >> 90 grams Mortons Tender Quick
    >> 30 grams dextrose
    >> 25 grams black pepper
    >> 30 grams dry mustard powder
    >> 15 grams coriander seed
    >> 2 tsp garlic powder
    >> 1 cup dry milk powder
    >> 1/4 tsp lactic starter culture for meat
    >> 1/4 cup warm water, preferably distilled
    >>
    >> Coarsely grind the black pepper and coriander seeds (and finely grind
    >> the mustard seeds) if using whole spices. Cut up meat into small
    >> chunks like stew meat. Mix the Tender Quick, dextrose, spices, milk
    >> powder into the meat. Chill until almost frozen. Grind with a 3/16"
    >> plate. Dissolve starter culture in water and sprinkle over meat
    >> mixture and mix thoroughly. Stuff into beef middles or extra large
    >> hog casings. Hang at 90 to 100 F. to ferment overnight or up to 24
    >> hours. Move to cool damp place to hang and dry to about 70% original
    >> weight.
    >>
    >> Best regards,
    >> Bob

    >
    >
    > Thanks Bob for the tips and recipe! I can get beef at a good discount
    > when buying bulk so I certainly try this recipe. DH and the kids like
    > salami sandwiches too so it will save me a bit from the high prices at
    > our local m & p grocery store with miniature deli. They have very nice
    > meats but limited selection and high prices. I've googled for curing
    > salt and found Morton's Tender Quick. They want $7 shipping & $2.50
    > handling. The Canadian division is Windsor Salt. They are a couple of
    > hours from here so I sent them an info request looking for someone who
    > sell it closer to me. There's a fair number of hunters around here so
    > there has to be a couple of stores that sell it. This sounds like it
    > will be a lot of fun experimenting.



    Around here, Morton Tender Quick is available in most grocery stores,
    year 'round, on the bottom shelf near the table salt.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  12. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    zxcvbob wrote:

    <SNIP>
    >> someone who sell it closer to me. There's a fair number of hunters
    >> around here so there has to be a couple of stores that sell it. This
    >> sounds like it will be a lot of fun experimenting.

    >
    >
    >
    > Around here, Morton Tender Quick is available in most grocery stores,
    > year 'round, on the bottom shelf near the table salt.


    We will be in the US this weekend so I'll check to see if I can find it.
    Thanks.
    >
    > Best regards,
    > Bob
     
  13. "~patches~" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    ....
    >I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on the
    >summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see before
    >buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could still make
    >the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?



    Make a smoker. Cardboard box, hotplate, pie tin to hold the smoking sawdust
    or chips. Any type of box, cabinet, tent, can work. You only need a low
    temperature to do the smoking. I put a hotplate in my smoker when curing to
    keep the temperature low. There is a picture on my web page.
    --
    Ed
    http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/
     
  14. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

    > "~patches~" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > ....
    >
    >>I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on the
    >>summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see before
    >>buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could still make
    >>the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?

    >
    >
    >
    > Make a smoker. Cardboard box, hotplate, pie tin to hold the smoking sawdust
    > or chips. Any type of box, cabinet, tent, can work. You only need a low
    > temperature to do the smoking. I put a hotplate in my smoker when curing to
    > keep the temperature low. There is a picture on my web page.


    Thanks Ed! Great site. I bookmarked it so I can refer to it again. I
    can't wait to try this out.
     
  15. On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 17:15:32 -0400, ~patches~
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
    >
    >> "~patches~" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >> ....
    >>
    >>>I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on the
    >>>summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see before
    >>>buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could still make
    >>>the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Make a smoker. Cardboard box, hotplate, pie tin to hold the smoking sawdust
    >> or chips. Any type of box, cabinet, tent, can work. You only need a low
    >> temperature to do the smoking. I put a hotplate in my smoker when curing to
    >> keep the temperature low. There is a picture on my web page.

    >
    >Thanks Ed! Great site. I bookmarked it so I can refer to it again. I
    >can't wait to try this out.

    Patches, If you make a smoker, the lower thermostat from a junk
    electric hot water tank works perfect for the low temps and the
    current to run a hot plate. A new thermostat only costs about $10
     
  16. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Allan Matthews wrote:
    > On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 17:15:32 -0400, ~patches~
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>"~patches~" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>
    >>>....
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on the
    >>>>summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see before
    >>>>buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could still make
    >>>>the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Make a smoker. Cardboard box, hotplate, pie tin to hold the smoking sawdust
    >>>or chips. Any type of box, cabinet, tent, can work. You only need a low
    >>>temperature to do the smoking. I put a hotplate in my smoker when curing to
    >>>keep the temperature low. There is a picture on my web page.

    >>
    >>Thanks Ed! Great site. I bookmarked it so I can refer to it again. I
    >>can't wait to try this out.

    >
    > Patches, If you make a smoker, the lower thermostat from a junk
    > electric hot water tank works perfect for the low temps and the
    > current to run a hot plate. A new thermostat only costs about $10



    That's a great idea! A "dish barrel" with small holes cut near the top
    to hold a couple of 1" dowel or broom sticks would be perfect for
    hanging sausages to smoke, and the thick cardboard sides will provide
    the insulation to hold the temperature steady.

    How low will those thermostats adjust? Can they go down to about 90 F
    (for fermenting the meat)?

    -Bob
     
  17. On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 18:23:53 -0500, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Allan Matthews wrote:
    >> On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 17:15:32 -0400, ~patches~
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>"~patches~" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>
    >>>>....
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>.

    >
    >How low will those thermostats adjust? Can they go down to about 90 F
    >(for fermenting the meat)?
    >
    >-Bob

    I forget how low they will go. Smokers usually run at about 160-170
    and they are perfect for that. If you buy one, make sure it is marked
    in degrees, rather than "hotter" and "cooler"
    An old refridgeraror is perfect. The one I used would handle over 50
    lbs of summer sausage at a time.
     
  18. On Tue, 04 Oct 2005 20:41:23 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"~patches~" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >...
    >>I bought two kinds of sausage spice mix yesterday. The instructions on the
    >>summer sausage mix says to smoke-cure something I neglected to see before
    >>buying. I don't have a smoker. Is there another way I could still make
    >>the sausage? Perhaps on the bbq set to low?

    >
    >
    >Make a smoker. Cardboard box, hotplate, pie tin to hold the smoking sawdust
    >or chips. Any type of box, cabinet, tent, can work. You only need a low
    >temperature to do the smoking. I put a hotplate in my smoker when curing to
    >keep the temperature low. There is a picture on my web page.


    Nice website.
    Allan
     
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