Savoy Cabbage

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Dee Randall, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever seen.
    Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a clue.
    Thanks,
    Dee Dee
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever seen.
    > Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    > ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a clue.
    > Thanks,
    > Dee Dee
    >
    >


    I like it as stuffed cabbage rolls, sliced up in oriental soups or stir
    fry's, ore even just sliced large and steamed with sausages. :)

    Use it any way you would regular cabbage, and IMHO it's BETTER.

    I find it to have more flavor.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  3. "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever seen.
    >Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    >ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a
    >clue.
    > Thanks,
    > Dee Dee

    Savoy cabbage makes an excellent side dish if you cut it in thin strips and
    fry it for just a few seconds.

    Joyce
     
  4. "Joyce Hanssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever seen.
    >>Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    >>ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a
    >>clue.
    >> Thanks,
    >> Dee Dee

    > Savoy cabbage makes an excellent side dish if you cut it in thin strips
    > and
    > fry it for just a few seconds.
    >
    > Joyce



    And by frying I mean deep frying :)
     
  5. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:
    > I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever
    > seen. Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me
    > what ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I
    > haven't a clue. Thanks,
    > Dee Dee


    Cabbage rolls! Or this lovely Austrian recipe for savoy cabbage soup
    (Kohlminestraussauppe from Austrian Cooking & Baking)

    3 pints stock
    1-1/2 lb. savoy cabbage
    5 oz. bacon fat
    4 oz. rice
    2 oz. parmesan cheese
    1 onion
    salt, pepper & marjoram

    Cut bacon fat into cubes and melt over a low flame. Add chopped onion and
    fry well until golden brown. Shred greens (cabbage) finely, scald with
    boiling water. Drain and add to onions with stock, salt, pepper and majoram
    to taste. Add rice Simmer until greens (cabbage) and rice are tender.
    Serve with grated cheese. Alternately, the greens (cabbage) can be added to
    the fried onion (no scalding), remaining procedure as described above.

    Jill
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Joyce Hanssen" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Joyce Hanssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >>I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever seen.
    > >>Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    > >>ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a
    > >>clue.
    > >> Thanks,
    > >> Dee Dee

    > > Savoy cabbage makes an excellent side dish if you cut it in thin strips
    > > and
    > > fry it for just a few seconds.
    > >
    > > Joyce

    >
    >
    > And by frying I mean deep frying :)
    >
    >


    <lol> I've sautee'd it with butter and olive oil, with onions....
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  7. OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever
    >> seen. Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me
    >> what ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I
    >> haven't a clue. Thanks,
    >> Dee Dee
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I like it as stuffed cabbage rolls, sliced up in oriental soups or
    > stir fry's, ore even just sliced large and steamed with sausages. :)
    >
    > Use it any way you would regular cabbage, and IMHO it's BETTER.
    >
    > I find it to have more flavor.


    I was going to suggest woking it and putting it in soups too. There are a
    ton of soup recipes if you just type in savoy cabbage soup recipe in the
    search field. First one that popped up looked really good. I have not
    tried this yet but intend to:

    Prep Time : 1hr
    Cook Time : 1hr
    Course : Soup
    Type of Prep : Boil
    Cuisine : Italian
    Occasion : Winter

    Another wintry recipe that will warm both body and kitchen, and is quite
    adaptable too.
    INGREDIENTS:

    1 1/4 pounds Savoy cabbage, shredded and chopped
    4 fresh, lean, mild sausages
    3/4 cup medium-grained rice suitable for soups (Originario or Maratelli for
    example) , or brown rice
    1 1/2 quarts light broth (you don't want something too salty or too
    flavorful), simmering
    1 medium-sized white onion, minced
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    3 tablespoons Freshly grated Parmigiano
    Salt & pepper to taste
    (Optional): 1/3 pound (150 g) fontina cheese, chredded
    PREPARATION:

    Once you have minced the onion, sauté it in the oil in a pot over a
    moderate flame, until it becomes translucent and light golden in color. Add
    the shredded, chopped cabbage and a few tablespoons of broth, and continue
    simmering until the cabbage is tender.


    In the meantime boil the sausages in water for about a half hour, then
    drain them, peel away the skins, and use a fork to break them up. Stir them
    into the cabbage mixture, cook a few minutes more, and then stir everything
    into the boiling broth, together with the rice. Simmer the soup until the
    rice is done to your taste, season the soup with salt and pepper to taste,
    stir in the grated cheese, and serve.

    This soup lends itself well to vatiations. For example, you could omit the
    sausages and use brown rice; simmer the soup in an oven proof pot, and when
    it's done, shred some Fontina cheese over it and run the pot under a
    broiler to melt the cheese. If you use a terracotta pot, the presentation
    will be very pretty.

    The wine? A light zesty red wine along the lines of a Cabernet from the
    Veneto or a Tocai Rosso. Also, the soup should be thick, but not dry. In
    other words, there should be enough liquid so you need to eat it with a
    spoon.

    Serves 4-6 Suggested Reading





    --
    ....Bacteria: The rear entrance to a cafeteria.

    All gramatical errors and misspellings due to Ramsey the cyber kitten. He
    now owns all keyboards and computing devices in the household and has the
    final say on what is, or is not, posted.
    Send email to dog30 at charter dot net
     
  8. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >> I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever
    >> seen. Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me
    >> what ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I
    >> haven't a clue. Thanks,
    >> Dee Dee

    >
    > Cabbage rolls! Or this lovely Austrian recipe for savoy cabbage soup
    > (Kohlminestraussauppe from Austrian Cooking & Baking)
    >
    > 3 pints stock
    > 1-1/2 lb. savoy cabbage
    > 5 oz. bacon fat
    > 4 oz. rice
    > 2 oz. parmesan cheese
    > 1 onion
    > salt, pepper & marjoram
    >
    > Cut bacon fat into cubes and melt over a low flame. Add chopped onion and
    > fry well until golden brown. Shred greens (cabbage) finely, scald with
    > boiling water. Drain and add to onions with stock, salt, pepper and
    > majoram
    > to taste. Add rice Simmer until greens (cabbage) and rice are tender.
    > Serve with grated cheese. Alternately, the greens (cabbage) can be added
    > to
    > the fried onion (no scalding), remaining procedure as described above.
    >
    > Jill
    >

    Thanks, that sounds good. I like the addition of rice. We had an Italian
    soup (Mario's Farmwife's potato & beet greens) last night and it was very
    good. I have on hand "Organic Free Range Chick Broth - 32 oz." and "Swanson
    Organic Beef Broth 99% fat free - 32 oz" Which might you suggest, Chicken or
    Beef broth for this recipe.

    I'm excited about this recipe too. Ice pellets for 24 hours in the
    forecast.
    Dee Dee
     
  9. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >> I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever
    >> seen. Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me
    >> what ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I
    >> haven't a clue. Thanks,
    >> Dee Dee

    >
    > Cabbage rolls! Or this lovely Austrian recipe for savoy cabbage soup
    > (Kohlminestraussauppe from Austrian Cooking & Baking)
    >
    > 3 pints stock
    > 1-1/2 lb. savoy cabbage
    > 5 oz. bacon fat
    > 4 oz. rice
    > 2 oz. parmesan cheese
    > 1 onion
    > salt, pepper & marjoram
    >
    > Cut bacon fat into cubes and melt over a low flame. Add chopped onion and
    > fry well until golden brown. Shred greens (cabbage) finely, scald with
    > boiling water. Drain and add to onions with stock, salt, pepper and
    > majoram
    > to taste. Add rice Simmer until greens (cabbage) and rice are tender.
    > Serve with grated cheese. Alternately, the greens (cabbage) can be added
    > to
    > the fried onion (no scalding), remaining procedure as described above.
    >
    > Jill
    >

    Thanks, that sounds good. I like the addition of rice. We had an Italian
    soup (Mario's Farmwife's potato & beet greens) last night and it was very
    good. I have on hand "Organic Free Range Chick Broth - 32 oz." and "Swanson
    Organic Beef Broth 99% fat free - 32 oz" Which might you suggest, Chicken or
    Beef broth for this recipe.

    I'm excited about this recipe too. Ice pellets for 24 hours in the
    forecast.
    Dee Dee
     
  10. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Dee Randall wrote:
    >>> I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever
    >>> seen. Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me
    >>> what ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I
    >>> haven't a clue. Thanks,
    >>> Dee Dee

    >>
    >> Cabbage rolls! Or this lovely Austrian recipe for savoy cabbage soup
    >> (Kohlminestraussauppe from Austrian Cooking & Baking)
    >>
    >> 3 pints stock
    >> 1-1/2 lb. savoy cabbage
    >> 5 oz. bacon fat
    >> 4 oz. rice
    >> 2 oz. parmesan cheese
    >> 1 onion
    >> salt, pepper & marjoram
    >>
    >> Cut bacon fat into cubes and melt over a low flame. Add chopped
    >> onion and fry well until golden brown. Shred greens (cabbage)
    >> finely, scald with boiling water. Drain and add to onions with
    >> stock, salt, pepper and majoram
    >> to taste. Add rice Simmer until greens (cabbage) and rice are
    >> tender. Serve with grated cheese. Alternately, the greens (cabbage)
    >> can be added to
    >> the fried onion (no scalding), remaining procedure as described
    >> above.
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>

    > Thanks, that sounds good. I like the addition of rice. We had an
    > Italian soup (Mario's Farmwife's potato & beet greens) last night and
    > it was very good. I have on hand "Organic Free Range Chick Broth -
    > 32 oz." and "Swanson Organic Beef Broth 99% fat free - 32 oz" Which
    > might you suggest, Chicken or Beef broth for this recipe.
    >
    > I'm excited about this recipe too. Ice pellets for 24 hours in the
    > forecast.
    > Dee Dee


    Eeeep! Ice! Seems either broth would work. The cookbook I referenced
    doesn't specify. What would they use in Austria? I'd use chicken broth :)

    Jill
     
  11. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:
    > I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever seen.
    > Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    > ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a clue.


    Savoy cabbage leaves tend to be thin and brittle and so don't lend
    themselves well to stuffing but still there are hundreds of cabbage
    recipes to choose from.

    http://www.justvegetablerecipes.com/inxcab.html
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever
    > >> seen. Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me
    > >> what ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I
    > >> haven't a clue. Thanks,
    > >> Dee Dee
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > > I like it as stuffed cabbage rolls, sliced up in oriental soups or
    > > stir fry's, ore even just sliced large and steamed with sausages. :)
    > >
    > > Use it any way you would regular cabbage, and IMHO it's BETTER.
    > >
    > > I find it to have more flavor.

    >
    > I was going to suggest woking it and putting it in soups too. There are a
    > ton of soup recipes if you just type in savoy cabbage soup recipe in the
    > search field. First one that popped up looked really good. I have not
    > tried this yet but intend to:
    >


    <snipped cool recipe>

    Hmmmmmmm...
    That gives me an idea.
    I'm doing another batch of chicken feet so will have yet more chicken
    foot stock. <lol>

    I have Leeks, baby bok choy and savoy cabbage out in the 'frige that
    needs to be used. I also have some shallots.

    Might combine some of those with that stock and throw in some
    Shiratake...... ;-d

    Danke!
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  13. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever
    >> >> seen. Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me
    >> >> what ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I
    >> >> haven't a clue. Thanks,
    >> >> Dee Dee
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> > I like it as stuffed cabbage rolls, sliced up in oriental soups or
    >> > stir fry's, ore even just sliced large and steamed with sausages. :)
    >> >
    >> > Use it any way you would regular cabbage, and IMHO it's BETTER.
    >> >
    >> > I find it to have more flavor.

    >>
    >> I was going to suggest woking it and putting it in soups too. There are a
    >> ton of soup recipes if you just type in savoy cabbage soup recipe in the
    >> search field. First one that popped up looked really good. I have not
    >> tried this yet but intend to:
    >>

    >
    > <snipped cool recipe>
    >
    > Hmmmmmmm...
    > That gives me an idea.
    > I'm doing another batch of chicken feet so will have yet more chicken
    > foot stock. <lol>
    >
    > I have Leeks, baby bok choy and savoy cabbage out in the 'frige that
    > needs to be used. I also have some shallots.
    >
    > Might combine some of those with that stock and throw in some
    > Shiratake...... ;-d
    >




    <snip>can anyone tell me
    > >> what ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage


    I most always google before I ask on ng's. Just getting some opinions here,
    too. So -- what would 'chicken feet' be? Any particular Asian country?
    :)))
    I have everything but the chicken feet, but thanks for the suggestion -- tee
    hee.
    Dee Dee
     
  14. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Michael "Dog3" Lonergan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever
    >>> seen. Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me
    >>> what ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I
    >>> haven't a clue. Thanks,
    >>> Dee Dee
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> I like it as stuffed cabbage rolls, sliced up in oriental soups or
    >> stir fry's, ore even just sliced large and steamed with sausages. :)
    >>
    >> Use it any way you would regular cabbage, and IMHO it's BETTER.
    >>
    >> I find it to have more flavor.

    >
    > I was going to suggest woking it and putting it in soups too. There are a
    > ton of soup recipes if you just type in savoy cabbage soup recipe in the
    > search field. First one that popped up looked really good. I have not
    > tried this yet but intend to:
    >
    > Prep Time : 1hr
    > Cook Time : 1hr
    > Course : Soup
    > Type of Prep : Boil
    > Cuisine : Italian
    > Occasion : Winter
    >
    > Another wintry recipe that will warm both body and kitchen, and is quite
    > adaptable too.
    > INGREDIENTS:
    >
    > 1 1/4 pounds Savoy cabbage, shredded and chopped
    > 4 fresh, lean, mild sausages
    > 3/4 cup medium-grained rice suitable for soups (Originario or Maratelli
    > for
    > example) , or brown rice
    > 1 1/2 quarts light broth (you don't want something too salty or too
    > flavorful), simmering
    > 1 medium-sized white onion, minced
    > 2 tablespoons olive oil
    > 3 tablespoons Freshly grated Parmigiano
    > Salt & pepper to taste
    > (Optional): 1/3 pound (150 g) fontina cheese, chredded
    > PREPARATION:
    >
    > Once you have minced the onion, sauté it in the oil in a pot over a
    > moderate flame, until it becomes translucent and light golden in color.
    > Add
    > the shredded, chopped cabbage and a few tablespoons of broth, and continue
    > simmering until the cabbage is tender.
    >
    >
    > In the meantime boil the sausages in water for about a half hour, then
    > drain them, peel away the skins, and use a fork to break them up. Stir
    > them
    > into the cabbage mixture, cook a few minutes more, and then stir
    > everything
    > into the boiling broth, together with the rice. Simmer the soup until the
    > rice is done to your taste, season the soup with salt and pepper to taste,
    > stir in the grated cheese, and serve.
    >
    > This soup lends itself well to vatiations. For example, you could omit the
    > sausages and use brown rice; simmer the soup in an oven proof pot, and
    > when
    > it's done, shred some Fontina cheese over it and run the pot under a
    > broiler to melt the cheese. If you use a terracotta pot, the presentation
    > will be very pretty.
    >
    > The wine? A light zesty red wine along the lines of a Cabernet from the
    > Veneto or a Tocai Rosso. Also, the soup should be thick, but not dry. In
    > other words, there should be enough liquid so you need to eat it with a
    > spoon.


    This Italian recipe sounds similar (sausage instead of bacon) to Jill's
    Austrian recipe I like. Must be a 'on the border' recipe.

    I'm sorry, but I have to relate a stupid restaurant situation somewhere
    either in Austria or Italy close to the border. I thought if anyone could
    do it, they could, fix a nice boiled chicken. It was so darned tough it
    would pull your teeth out -- I asked about it's toughness, and the waiter
    said, "It's a 'walking' chicken." I'll never forget this term.
    Dee Dee
     
  15. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 09:17:49 -0500, "Dee Randall"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever seen.
    >Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    >ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a clue.
    >Thanks,
    >Dee Dee
    >


    Italian. Sautee with garlic, salt, and pepper.

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  16. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever seen.
    >Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    >ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a clue.
    > Thanks,
    > Dee Dee


    here you go.

    Dimitri

    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/publications/vegetabletravelers/cabbage.html


    It was not until 1536 in Europe that unmistakably clear descriptions of
    hard-heading cabbage were recorded. At that time also a loose-heading form
    called romanos, and later called chou d'Italie and chou de Savoys, for the
    Italian province, was described. This "savoy cabbage," a crumpled-leaved kind
    having high quality, was grown in England in the 1500's.
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >
    > > Hmmmmmmm...
    > > That gives me an idea.
    > > I'm doing another batch of chicken feet so will have yet more chicken
    > > foot stock. <lol>
    > >
    > > I have Leeks, baby bok choy and savoy cabbage out in the 'frige that
    > > needs to be used. I also have some shallots.
    > >
    > > Might combine some of those with that stock and throw in some
    > > Shiratake...... ;-d
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > <snip>can anyone tell me
    > > >> what ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage

    >
    > I most always google before I ask on ng's. Just getting some opinions here,
    > too. So -- what would 'chicken feet' be? Any particular Asian country?
    > :)))


    Any Asian country, plus Mexico, Belgium and Germany. ;-)

    > I have everything but the chicken feet, but thanks for the suggestion -- tee
    > hee.
    > Dee Dee


    Any chicken stock will do. <lol>
    I'd recommend wings then for more "gelly" power! ;-d
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  18. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever seen.
    >>Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    >>ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a
    >>clue.
    >> Thanks,
    >> Dee Dee

    >
    > here you go.
    >
    > Dimitri
    >
    > http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/publications/vegetabletravelers/cabbage.html
    >
    >
    > It was not until 1536 in Europe that unmistakably clear descriptions of
    > hard-heading cabbage were recorded. At that time also a loose-heading form
    > called romanos, and later called chou d'Italie and chou de Savoys, for the
    > Italian province, was described. This "savoy cabbage," a crumpled-leaved
    > kind having high quality, was grown in England in the 1500's.

    Thanks,
    I think the first time I ever had 'savoy cabbage' was at the Savoy-Tivoli
    Restaurant in S.F. So this surely fits.
    Thinking back, that was a fun restaurant at that time (1970). I googled it,
    and it looks like it is still there.
    Dee Dee
     
  19. jake

    jake Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:

    > I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever seen.
    > Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    > ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a clue.
    > Thanks,
    > Dee Dee
    >
    >

    I believe there is an Italian recipe that involves savoy cabbage and
    white beans and not much else (maybe garlic and oil). I seem to remeber
    reading about it in Real Fast Food by Nigel Slater.

    Of course I'd want to add bacon :)
     
  20. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "jake" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >
    >> I bought the most beautiful, perfect head of savoy cabbage I've ever
    >> seen. Average size. Besides a raw cabbage salad, can anyone tell me what
    >> ethnic/country recipe lends itself best to savoy cabbage. I haven't a
    >> clue.
    >> Thanks,
    >> Dee Dee

    > I believe there is an Italian recipe that involves savoy cabbage and white
    > beans and not much else (maybe garlic and oil). I seem to remeber reading
    > about it in Real Fast Food by Nigel Slater.
    >
    > Of course I'd want to add bacon :)


    I'll bet you're thinking of escarole -- betcha!
    But, you know, I was thinking of adding cannelli beans to the recipe - great
    minds.
    Thanks,
    Dee Dee
     
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