Saying "Hi"

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Anus, Feb 4, 2004.

  1. Anus

    Anus Guest

    Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets start another
    boring, old-school debate!



    Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I mean...it's not
    very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy! If
    someone says "Hi"...you say it back! You'd think we'd all stick together
    rather than being a bunch of stuck-up arseholes.

    I've noticed that it's mostly road riders (who struggle to un-clip at
    lights) that elevate themselves to the "holier than thou" position of not
    having to communicate....May 1000 flats come your way!
     
    Tags:


  2. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "Anus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets start

    another
    > boring, old-school debate!
    >
    >
    >
    > Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I mean...it's not
    > very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy! If
    > someone says "Hi"...you say it back! You'd think we'd all stick together
    > rather than being a bunch of stuck-up arseholes.
    >
    > I've noticed that it's mostly road riders (who struggle to un-clip at
    > lights) that elevate themselves to the "holier than thou" position of not
    > having to communicate....May 1000 flats come your way!
    >
    >


    Yes. this one has been around the block a couple of times before. I dont
    know why that is. Its as if they feel I am not worthy enough to consider
    nodding back because I am not wearing shiny lycra and riding a $5000 bike.
    Or it could be that they are in their own world and dont notice you.

    I say hi to all. Even if i race past a jogger going the other way (back
    street for this one though).

    BTW Those helmet debates surely get my goat. People will never agree on
    that one.

    regards
    Peter
     
  3. dejonica

    dejonica Guest

    "Anus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets start

    another
    > boring, old-school debate!
    >
    >
    >
    > Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I mean...it's not
    > very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy! If
    > someone says "Hi"...you say it back! You'd think we'd all stick together
    > rather than being a bunch of stuck-up arseholes.
    >
    > I've noticed that it's mostly road riders (who struggle to un-clip at
    > lights) that elevate themselves to the "holier than thou" position of not
    > having to communicate....May 1000 flats come your way!
    >
    >


    It's been the opposite for me (re riders who cannot un-clip).
    It's been the guys wearing the shiny lycra and riding the expensive looking
    bikes who seem to think a greeting is beneath them..
    Also ive noticed various areas (such as beach road riders don't say hello,
    while yarra bend / mt dandenong riders do)

    ps, i usually don't say much of a greeting while riding up a hill as i'm
    usually struggling to breathe:) But at least a nod of the head is good
    enough?
     
  4. Clayton Lee

    Clayton Lee Guest

    This one gets a run on aus.motorcycle as well, but it is "Whey don't other
    riders nod back"

    Age old problem.

    SB
    "Anus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets start

    another
    > boring, old-school debate!
    >
    >
    >
    > Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I mean...it's not
    > very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy! If
    > someone says "Hi"...you say it back! You'd think we'd all stick together
    > rather than being a bunch of stuck-up arseholes.
    >
    > I've noticed that it's mostly road riders (who struggle to un-clip at
    > lights) that elevate themselves to the "holier than thou" position of not
    > having to communicate....May 1000 flats come your way!
    >
    >
     
  5. its_stuart

    its_stuart Guest

    I agree Mr Sol;)

    Furthermore I feel we should band together and rise up against our
    agressors (everybody that doesn't ride). You see I feel that man has
    ruled this world as a stumbling demented child king long enough. and as
    his empire crumbles, the precious cyclist shall rise as his most fitting
    succesor!!

    MUHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAH!!!!:p



    --
     
  6. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    Anus wrote:
    > Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets start another
    > boring, old-school debate!
    >
    > Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I mean...it's not
    > very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy! If
    > someone says "Hi"...you say it back! You'd think we'd all stick together
    > rather than being a bunch of stuck-up arseholes.
    >
    > I've noticed that it's mostly road riders (who struggle to un-clip at
    > lights) that elevate themselves to the "holier than thou" position of not
    > having to communicate....May 1000 flats come your way!


    Maybe it depends where you ride and live. In the country, maybe any kind
    of cyclist would nod/wave to any other kind of cyclist - there's just so
    few of them. Same on a walking trail - you'd usually nod, smile, or say
    hello to people coming the other way even though you don't know them
    from Adam, whereas if you saw the same person walking towards you on
    George/Collins/Hindley/<insert_big_street_here> Street, you'd totally
    ignore them and nobody would be the least bit offended. In big cities
    like Sydney (where I live) or Melbourne (where one of the earlier
    posters lives), maybe there's so many cyclists (especially some of the
    places I ride) that you don't feel the need to be matey with every
    single one of them, and prefer to associate with (or at least nod at)
    the ones with whom you feel more empathy (e.g. MTBers might feel more at
    home with other MTBers, commuters with commuters, roadies with roadies,
    etc.). I wouldn't nod at some kid on his BMX in the city any more than
    he would at me, and neither party would mind or be surprised by the lack
    of interaction. I don't pretend to know what it's like to ride a great
    piece of singletrack, and maybe the MTBer I see on the street doesn't
    know what it means to plan a criterium race just right and snatch
    victory on the line - what do we have in common apart from gears and a
    chain? Why _would_ we nod or wave to each other? If we're meant to be
    such genial souls, why not wave at pedestrians, horse riders, motorbike
    riders (who have everything we have), or motorists?

    I'd be interested to hear the viewpoint of cyclists who live and ride
    outside the big cities, where there is a smaller total cycling
    population - maybe there is more cross-discipline interaction there?

    &roo
    Roadie, Commuter, Rec Rider, and general nodder - except to BMX/MTB
    riders ;-)
     
  7. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    Andrew Swan wrote:
    > Anus wrote:
    >
    >> Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets start
    >> another
    >> boring, old-school debate!
    >>
    >> Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I mean...it's not
    >> very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy! If
    >> someone says "Hi"...you say it back! You'd think we'd all stick together
    >> rather than being a bunch of stuck-up arseholes.
    >>
    >> I've noticed that it's mostly road riders (who struggle to un-clip at
    >> lights) that elevate themselves to the "holier than thou" position of not
    >> having to communicate....May 1000 flats come your way!

    >
    >
    > Maybe it depends where you ride and live. In the country, maybe any kind
    > of cyclist would nod/wave to any other kind of cyclist - there's just so
    > few of them. Same on a walking trail - you'd usually nod, smile, or say
    > hello to people coming the other way even though you don't know them
    > from Adam, whereas if you saw the same person walking towards you on
    > George/Collins/Hindley/<insert_big_street_here> Street, you'd totally
    > ignore them and nobody would be the least bit offended. In big cities
    > like Sydney (where I live) or Melbourne (where one of the earlier
    > posters lives), maybe there's so many cyclists (especially some of the
    > places I ride) that you don't feel the need to be matey with every
    > single one of them, and prefer to associate with (or at least nod at)
    > the ones with whom you feel more empathy (e.g. MTBers might feel more at
    > home with other MTBers, commuters with commuters, roadies with roadies,
    > etc.). I wouldn't nod at some kid on his BMX in the city any more than
    > he would at me, and neither party would mind or be surprised by the lack
    > of interaction. I don't pretend to know what it's like to ride a great
    > piece of singletrack, and maybe the MTBer I see on the street doesn't
    > know what it means to plan a criterium race just right and snatch
    > victory on the line - what do we have in common apart from gears and a
    > chain? Why _would_ we nod or wave to each other? If we're meant to be
    > such genial souls, why not wave at pedestrians, horse riders, motorbike
    > riders (who have everything we have), or motorists?
    >
    > I'd be interested to hear the viewpoint of cyclists who live and ride
    > outside the big cities, where there is a smaller total cycling
    > population - maybe there is more cross-discipline interaction there?
    >
    > &roo
    > Roadie, Commuter, Rec Rider, and general nodder - except to BMX/MTB
    > riders ;-)


    In case anyone gets the wrong idea from the above, I see a BIG
    difference between nodding and nodding _back_. If you're nodded at by
    anyone, not to return the gesture is just plain rude. Not to be the
    initiator, however, is a matter of personal preference.

    &roo
     
  8. DRS

    DRS Guest

    Andrew Swan <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]

    [...]

    > Why _would_ we nod or wave to each other? If we're meant to be such
    > genial souls, why not wave at pedestrians, horse riders, motorbike
    > riders (who have everything we have), or motorists?


    Well said. When I'm out for a ride I'm minding my own business and anyone
    who thinks I'm rude for not responding to someone I've never met and will
    never see again can go fuck themselves with their own arrogance.

    --

    A: Top-posters.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
     
  9. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Andrew Swan <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > [email protected]
    >
    > [...]
    >
    > > Why _would_ we nod or wave to each other? If we're meant to be such
    > > genial souls, why not wave at pedestrians, horse riders, motorbike
    > > riders (who have everything we have), or motorists?

    >
    > Well said. When I'm out for a ride I'm minding my own business and anyone
    > who thinks I'm rude for not responding to someone I've never met and will
    > never see again can go fuck themselves with their own arrogance.
    >
    > --
    >
    > A: Top-posters.
    > Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
    >
    >


    Your talking to us now. You dont know us. Go fuck yourself and your
    arrogance thinking you can talk to us strangers. When I go to a dinner
    party and their is people their I dont know. I just ignore them. How dare
    their arrogance if they approach or introduce themselves. We humans are not
    social animals. We prefer to be bitter loners who mind their own business.
     
  10. bag_head

    bag_head Guest

    Anus wrote:
    > Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets start
    > another boring, old- school debate!
    > Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I mean...it's not
    > very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy! If
    > someone says "Hi"...you say it back! You'd think we'd all stick together
    > rather than being a bunch of stuck-up arseholes.
    > I've noticed that it's mostly road riders (who struggle to un-clip at
    > lights) that elevate themselves to the "holier than thou" position of
    > not having to communicate....May 1000 flats come your way!



    Maybe it's got something to do with your name! :) as a person who ride
    with a bag on his head I am not usually in the habit of talking t
    other anus's :


    -
     
  11. amirm

    amirm Guest

    Anus wrote:
    > Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets start
    > another boring, old- school debate!
    > Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I mean...it's not
    > very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy! If
    > someone says "Hi"...you say it back! You'd think we'd all stick together
    > rather than being a bunch of stuck-up arseholes.
    > I've noticed that it's mostly road riders (who struggle to un-clip at
    > lights) that elevate themselves to the "holier than thou" position of
    > not having to communicate....May 1000 flats come your way!


    Well, Andrew set out a nice analytical background. I totall
    agree with him

    I ride in Canberra. Is it big or small? Country or city? ;

    Initiation of greeting to a stranger is an act of generousity. There'
    no promise that there would be a respond worthy of our greeting.
    generous person, by definition, would not need and would not depend o
    the response. He/she initiates the good deed, because he/she believes i
    to be right. (wow, so philosophical!

    Of course, there is always the long-term aspect. If such an act i
    promoted and people persist, it will become a common practice

    I'd like to divide cyclists in two overlapping groups. The bigger grou
    are the public riding for a good fun. A warm approach to people by us i
    good to promote the image of cycling. The second group are th
    enthusiasts and pros who spend a lot more resources on riding. These
    need to be even more proactive in creating a good image, because the
    can be categorically criticised for their conduct. I'm pretty sure th
    better image they create, the shinier their sport achievements wil
    become (as a popular/respectable sport). You agree that not every spor
    holds the same level of respect or classy image in public'c eye

    I don't think we can make any generalisation. If someone is u
    himself/herself, then he/she will show it everywhere. Be it on bike, a
    the wheel, at work or wherever. If someone feels above the publi
    because of only a few grands worth of lycra, carbon fibre and allo
    material, that person has a small world

    Cheers, Amir



    -
     
  12. hippy

    hippy Guest

    > Anus wrote:
    > > Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets

    start
    > > another boring, old- school debate!
    > > Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I

    mean...it's not
    > > very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy!


    I wasn't going to add to this common thread, but...

    If you are in front of me, I will try and pass you.
    If you are behind me, I will try and stay ahead.
    If I come close to you I will (usually) say G'Day.
    Not so close, I will (usually) nod my head in your
    general direction (I continue this on Beach Rd.
    until my head gets sore from bobbing! :)).
    If you are on a bike I automatically respect you
    (until you do something stupid) and will show a
    lot more interest in you than any one of the
    thousands of cars that pass me/I pass.
    I don't care if you don't say anything back or nod
    back, but when you do I feel 'extra' chuffed.
    Actually, not responding to me might make me more
    inclined to chase you down :)
    I understand that we don't HAVE to exhibit any
    form of recognition or greeting but we are a minority
    and I choose to "be nice" to others in the minority, no
    harm done to me or them.

    hippy
     
  13. Keibar

    Keibar Guest

    It's probably a bit like driving from Perth to Melbourne,as you get out into the sticks people start waving at you and you start waving back,then when you initiate the wave and it's not reciprocated you think f**k this and stop waving then someone waves again and you don't respond and you feel like a right arsehole................go figure!:cool


    -
     
  14. DRS

    DRS Guest

    John Doe <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]
    > "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Andrew Swan <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> [email protected]
    >>
    >> [...]
    >>
    >>> Why _would_ we nod or wave to each other? If we're meant to be such
    >>> genial souls, why not wave at pedestrians, horse riders, motorbike
    >>> riders (who have everything we have), or motorists?

    >>
    >> Well said. When I'm out for a ride I'm minding my own business and
    >> anyone who thinks I'm rude for not responding to someone I've never
    >> met and will never see again can go fuck themselves with their own
    >> arrogance.


    [...]

    > Your talking to us now. You dont know us. Go fuck yourself and your
    > arrogance thinking you can talk to us strangers. When I go to a
    > dinner party and their is people their I dont know. I just ignore
    > them. How dare their arrogance if they approach or introduce
    > themselves. We humans are not social animals. We prefer to be
    > bitter loners who mind their own business.


    Sorry, that effort's barely deserving of a D-. The rhetoric would have
    worked much more powerfully if the analogies had made sense but instead
    they're just silly and show that you didn't think the matter through. You
    cannot compare two social environments with a non-social one. Both your
    analogies are predicated upon communication, neither a newsgroup nor a
    dinner party make any sense without it, but riding is very often a solitary
    activity and there can be no reasonable expectation of engaging every
    stranger you meet simply because they also happen to be riding. You'll have
    to do much better than that if you hope to pass the exam.

    --

    A: Top-posters.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
     
  15. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > John Doe <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > [email protected]
    > > "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >> Andrew Swan <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> [email protected]
    > >>


    > Sorry, that effort's barely deserving of a D-. The rhetoric would have
    > worked much more powerfully if the analogies had made sense but instead
    > they're just silly and show that you didn't think the matter through. You
    > cannot compare two social environments with a non-social one. Both your
    > analogies are predicated upon communication, neither a newsgroup nor a
    > dinner party make any sense without it, but riding is very often a

    solitary
    > activity and there can be no reasonable expectation of engaging every
    > stranger you meet simply because they also happen to be riding. You'll

    have
    > to do much better than that if you hope to pass the exam.
    >
    > --


    Hi Andrew,

    Sorry I was just trying a little humour (bit miffed about the exam though.
    I have never got a pass D- before in my life). Sorry if I offended you. I
    really should not have returned the swearing and I did mean to add a
    disclaimer at the bottom to warn of my intended humour.

    I also engage pedestrians (another solitary activity) as I walk down the
    street. Most will give you a smile and a hello. Its a nice feeling to get
    that response - or even they intiate the smile, hello or nod. Its part of my
    social make up.

    Then there are people as you that like to be left alone in life or at times
    where you enjoy your solitude. Its ok, not everyone has the same level of
    social need. I really enjoy a good chat and get to meet a lot of people.
    Then you get to meet the regulars you meet on your cycle. You get to know
    names and build a sort of friendship with people. I do the same down at my
    local surfclub. Turn up for my morning swim and I get greeted by dozens who
    smile and greet me by name. The one thing I will do is always try. I
    probably only think 1 in 10 or less would actually ignore me as we pass. If
    cycling in the same direction it would be a lot lot less of a chance to not
    engage in conversation. Even serious groups on training runs will chat.
    Unless they are going too slow :).

    regards
    peter
     
  16. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "Keibar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It's probably a bit like driving from Perth to Melbourne,as you get out

    into the sticks people start waving at you and you start waving back,then
    when you initiate the wave and it's not reciprocated you think f**k this and
    stop waving then someone waves again and you don't respond and you feel like
    a right arsehole................go figure!:cool:
    >
    >


    Don't worry about them not waving. Always wave - 9 out of 10 will respond.
    Ignore the setbacks. You could cause a domino effect. You stop waving then
    someone waves to you and you dont (usually because its too late) and they
    they say "I am not going to wave anymore" Wave to them all. Remember some
    people are just shy and feel uncomfortable interacting with strangers.

    Peter
     
  17. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    John Doe wrote:
    > Hi Andrew,
    >
    > Sorry I was just trying a little humour (bit miffed about the exam though.
    > I have never got a pass D- before in my life). Sorry if I offended you. I
    > really should not have returned the swearing and I did mean to add a
    > disclaimer at the bottom to warn of my intended humour.
    >

    <snip>
    >
    > regards
    > peter


    That wasn't me that graded you D-, that was DRS.

    &roo
     
  18. Hammer

    Hammer Guest

    Maybe those riders that dont say HI already have there very own Head Up
    display!!
    To busy reading there own inputs!!

    READ ON @: http://www.kycyclist.org/dec2003/0015.html
    &
    http://www.motionresearch.com/




    "John Doe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Keibar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > It's probably a bit like driving from Perth to Melbourne,as you get out

    > into the sticks people start waving at you and you start waving back,then
    > when you initiate the wave and it's not reciprocated you think f**k this

    and
    > stop waving then someone waves again and you don't respond and you feel

    like
    > a right arsehole................go figure!:cool:
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Don't worry about them not waving. Always wave - 9 out of 10 will

    respond.
    > Ignore the setbacks. You could cause a domino effect. You stop waving

    then
    > someone waves to you and you dont (usually because its too late) and they
    > they say "I am not going to wave anymore" Wave to them all. Remember

    some
    > people are just shy and feel uncomfortable interacting with strangers.
    >
    > Peter
    >
    >
     
  19. gescom

    gescom Guest

    It makes my day when someone waves or nods. Its a part of cycling whic
    I like. Driving cars all the time people tend to become ignorant o
    others and their environment imo

    Btw, I was riding outside of Colac (Western VIC.) one day and got a wav
    from Cliff Young (now sadly deceased) jogging up a hill the other way
    something I will never forget


    -
     
  20. Hammer

    Hammer Guest

    My 2 cents worth.
    I do generally nod to other cyclists. However this depends on my duration of
    ride etc. If, like the other weekend I did 90Km , towards the end I am
    rather zonked and hence not much nodding.

    However, generally out in the burbs along the dandenong creek trail I find
    80-90% of cyclists rather responsive to a friendly nod. I think this shows a
    little respect and acknowledgement to other riders. Take that how you
    will!!!! When I ride around the Yarra (Just a treat every now and again) I
    enjoy giving a nod to other cyclists etc. I find its a bit of a proximity .
    Out on the roads where everything's happening and your further distance
    apart, it maybe harder to nod at people. Hence I don't bother. I guess in
    short, a nod is something one does more on a single and more localised
    riding trail when two riders pass in close proximity!!
    In a Nut Shell-
    Next time there's a 120Kg Mass of Mtb biker and bike thundering towards you
    and its an Avanti Hammer......You'll get a Nod!!!! .

    Thats if I am not to busy with my new Head Up Display system..........LOL

    "Andrew Swan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Andrew Swan wrote:
    > > Anus wrote:
    > >
    > >> Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets start
    > >> another
    > >> boring, old-school debate!
    > >>
    > >> Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I mean...it's

    not
    > >> very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy! If
    > >> someone says "Hi"...you say it back! You'd think we'd all stick

    together
    > >> rather than being a bunch of stuck-up arseholes.
    > >>
    > >> I've noticed that it's mostly road riders (who struggle to un-clip at
    > >> lights) that elevate themselves to the "holier than thou" position of

    not
    > >> having to communicate....May 1000 flats come your way!

    > >
    > >
    > > Maybe it depends where you ride and live. In the country, maybe any kind
    > > of cyclist would nod/wave to any other kind of cyclist - there's just so
    > > few of them. Same on a walking trail - you'd usually nod, smile, or say
    > > hello to people coming the other way even though you don't know them
    > > from Adam, whereas if you saw the same person walking towards you on
    > > George/Collins/Hindley/<insert_big_street_here> Street, you'd totally
    > > ignore them and nobody would be the least bit offended. In big cities
    > > like Sydney (where I live) or Melbourne (where one of the earlier
    > > posters lives), maybe there's so many cyclists (especially some of the
    > > places I ride) that you don't feel the need to be matey with every
    > > single one of them, and prefer to associate with (or at least nod at)
    > > the ones with whom you feel more empathy (e.g. MTBers might feel more at
    > > home with other MTBers, commuters with commuters, roadies with roadies,
    > > etc.). I wouldn't nod at some kid on his BMX in the city any more than
    > > he would at me, and neither party would mind or be surprised by the lack
    > > of interaction. I don't pretend to know what it's like to ride a great
    > > piece of singletrack, and maybe the MTBer I see on the street doesn't
    > > know what it means to plan a criterium race just right and snatch
    > > victory on the line - what do we have in common apart from gears and a
    > > chain? Why _would_ we nod or wave to each other? If we're meant to be
    > > such genial souls, why not wave at pedestrians, horse riders, motorbike
    > > riders (who have everything we have), or motorists?
    > >
    > > I'd be interested to hear the viewpoint of cyclists who live and ride
    > > outside the big cities, where there is a smaller total cycling
    > > population - maybe there is more cross-discipline interaction there?
    > >
    > > &roo
    > > Roadie, Commuter, Rec Rider, and general nodder - except to BMX/MTB
    > > riders ;-)

    >
    > In case anyone gets the wrong idea from the above, I see a BIG
    > difference between nodding and nodding _back_. If you're nodded at by
    > anyone, not to return the gesture is just plain rude. Not to be the
    > initiator, however, is a matter of personal preference.
    >
    > &roo
    >
     
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