Saying "Hi"

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Anus, Feb 4, 2004.

  1. Liz

    Liz Guest

    "Andrew Swan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    <snip>>
    > I'd be interested to hear the viewpoint of cyclists who live and ride
    > outside the big cities, where there is a smaller total cycling
    > population - maybe there is more cross-discipline interaction there?
    >
    > &roo
    > Roadie, Commuter, Rec Rider, and general nodder - except to BMX/MTB
    > riders ;-)
    >

    On our bike trip round the Top End (Darwin > Kakadu > Nitmiluk > Litchfield
    > Darwin) everyone waved at us. Even the occasional road-train!


    Liz
     


  2. Caitie

    Caitie Guest

    Andrew Swan wrote:
    > Anus wrote:
    > > Seeing as we're doing the boring "Helmet Debate" again....lets start
    > > another boring, old- school debate!
    > >
    > > Why is it that some riders just wont say "hello" back? I mean...it's
    > > not very hard. Even just a nod of the head. It's just common courtesy!
    > > If someone says "Hi"...you say it back! You'd think we'd all stick
    > > together rather than being a bunch of stuck-up arseholes.
    > >
    > > I've noticed that it's mostly road riders (who struggle to un-clip at
    > > lights) that elevate themselves to the "holier than thou" position of
    > > not having to communicate....May 1000 flats come your way!

    > Maybe it depends where you ride and live. In the country, maybe any kind
    > of cyclist would nod/wave to any other kind of cyclist - there's just so
    > few of them. Same on a walking trail - you'd usually nod, smile, or say
    > hello to people coming the other way even though you don't know them
    > from Adam, whereas if you saw the same person walking towards you on
    > George/Collins/Hindley/<insert_big_street_here> Street, you'd totally
    > ignore them and nobody would be the least bit offended. In big cities
    > like Sydney (where I live) or Melbourne (where one of the earlier
    > posters lives), maybe there's so many cyclists (especially some of the
    > places I ride) that you don't feel the need to be matey with every
    > single one of them, and prefer to associate with (or at least nod at)
    > the ones with whom you feel more empathy (e.g. MTBers might feel more at
    > home with other MTBers, commuters with commuters, roadies with roadies,
    > etc.). I wouldn't nod at some kid on his BMX in the city any more than
    > he would at me, and neither party would mind or be surprised by the lack
    > of interaction. I don't pretend to know what it's like to ride a great
    > piece of singletrack, and maybe the MTBer I see on the street doesn't
    > know what it means to plan a criterium race just right and snatch
    > victory on the line - what do we have in common apart from gears and a
    > chain? Why _would_ we nod or wave to each other? If we're meant to be
    > such genial souls, why not wave at pedestrians, horse riders, motorbike
    > riders (who have everything we have), or motorists?
    > I'd be interested to hear the viewpoint of cyclists who live and ride
    > outside the big cities, where there is a smaller total cycling
    > population - maybe there is more cross-discipline interaction there?
    > &roo Roadie, Commuter, Rec Rider, and general nodder - except to BMX/MTB
    > riders ;-)



    I live in a large regional town and all the roadies & MTbikers wave t
    each other and most other people (who are out on the bike) as well, bu
    I never did when living in Melbourne. I have generally found Triathlete
    to be ridiculously stuck-up however; maybe they are just too bus
    readjusting those sleeveless jerseys or their countless number of drin
    bottles to notice other people


    -
     
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