Scary

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by [Not Responding], Jun 15, 2004.

  1. If anyone else knows the cliffs at Southerndown in South Wales, they
    are likely to share my horror at this story:

    <URL:http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_east/3802477.stm>

    "Relatives have paid tribute to a cyclist who fell to this death at a
    south Wales beauty spot.
    Mike Ford, 27, had been trying out a new mountain bike along a cliff
    path in Southerndown in the Vale of Glamorgan, when he plunged 100ft.
    ...."

    I know this spot because I lived nearby for a short time as a boy and
    later was at school just down the coast.

    Next to the road there is what looks to be a rolling, steep grassy
    hill. You simply cannot see the 200 ft cliff that follows. The idea of
    brakelessly rolling over the edge used scare me witless when I was
    younger and even typing this has given me sweaty fingers.
     
    Tags:


  2. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "[Not Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Next to the road there is what looks to be a rolling, steep grassy
    > hill. You simply cannot see the 200 ft cliff that follows.


    Nasty. I can understand how things like that happen. I once almost jumped
    off a 100ft plus cliff on the Isle of Lewis (almost exactly here -
    http://tinyurl.com/2mm8h). I was new to the area and I'd been walking along
    the beach with a girlfriend in the half light of a Lewis night. I didn't
    notice the gradual climb once we were off the beach and when we came to the
    next bay I was just about to jump down on to the sand (I had taken the
    short run up to clear what looked like a small rock at the edge of the
    grass) when I noticed two rather large stacks, the tops of which were level
    with me and the bases were way below on the beach.

    I have never stopped so quickly in my life.


    Graeme
     
  3. [Not Responding] wrote:

    > If anyone else knows the cliffs at Southerndown in South Wales, they
    > are likely to share my horror at this story:
    >
    > <URL:http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_east/3802477.stm>


    [...]

    > Next to the road there is what looks to be a rolling, steep grassy
    > hill. You simply cannot see the 200 ft cliff that follows. The idea of
    > brakelessly rolling over the edge used scare me witless when I was
    > younger and even typing this has given me sweaty fingers.


    Aye. It used to scare me witless, too, when we used to go there when I
    was a kid. It's also a popular suicide spot, for obvious reasons.

    That was the day I was cycling to Barry. My mate phoned me when he saw
    it on the news, to make sure I hadn't gone on beyond Barry.

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/
    "It's being so cheerful as keeps me going"
     
  4. iarocu

    iarocu Guest

    Graeme <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "[Not Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > Next to the road there is what looks to be a rolling, steep grassy
    > > hill. You simply cannot see the 200 ft cliff that follows.

    >
    > Nasty. I can understand how things like that happen. I once almost jumped
    > off a 100ft plus cliff on the Isle of Lewis


    When I was about 12 or 13 and on holiday in Ness at the north of Lewis
    I almost fell off a seacliff. I'd been scrambling down a ledge from
    the top and my handhold broke off. I was falling backwards but managed
    to grab something. Just one of those teenage incidents parents never
    know about unless it goes seriously wrong.
    Iain
     
  5. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    That really is scary. It's the sort of thing that happens in those
    nightmares you have what wake you up.
     
  6. On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 02:49:37 -0700, iarocu wrote:

    > Graeme <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> "[Not Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >> > Next to the road there is what looks to be a rolling, steep grassy
    >> > hill. You simply cannot see the 200 ft cliff that follows.

    >>
    >> Nasty. I can understand how things like that happen. I once almost jumped
    >> off a 100ft plus cliff on the Isle of Lewis

    >
    > When I was about 12 or 13 and on holiday in Ness at the north of Lewis
    > I almost fell off a seacliff. I'd been scrambling down a ledge from
    > the top and my handhold broke off. I was falling backwards but managed
    > to grab something. Just one of those teenage incidents parents never
    > know about unless it goes seriously wrong.


    It always amazes me that anyone lives through childhood. I'm sure I'd
    never get away with half the daft things I can remember doing if I were to
    try them now.

    I also (sexistly) assumed that my sisters and their friends were picking
    flowers and playing tennis whilst my friends and I were attempting
    explosions and testing homebuilt parachutes.

    Now we're older and have talked about it, I know they had no more sense
    than I did.

    AC
     
  7. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    anonymous coward <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:p[email protected]:

    > It always amazes me that anyone lives through childhood.


    I'm still living mine at age 34. Childhood is wasted on kids. :)


    Graeme
     
  8. Mike Farnes

    Mike Farnes Guest

    Graeme wrote
    > "[Not Responding]" wrote
    >
    > > Next to the road there is what looks to be a rolling, steep grassy
    > > hill. You simply cannot see the 200 ft cliff that follows.

    >
    > Nasty. I can understand how things like that happen. I once almost jumped
    > off a 100ft plus cliff on the Isle of Lewis..


    A couple of years ago my son very nearly tried to 'grab some air' over
    Beachy Head in Sussex. I just realized in time how close we were to
    the edge and managed to warn him. Makes me go wobbly thinking about
    it. Moral: don't go cycling near cliffs in thick fog.

    Mike
     
  9. NJF

    NJF Guest

    Mike Farnes wrote:
    A couple of years ago my son very nearly tried to 'grab some air' over
    Beachy Head in Sussex. I just realized in time how close we were to
    the edge and managed to warn him. Makes me go wobbly thinking about
    it. Moral: don't go cycling near cliffs in thick fog.

    IIRC some scouts did it off the side of ben-nevis, one of thereasons the
    SA has tightened its rules....
     
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