Schwinn Backpedaling

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Garrison Hillia, Mar 19, 2004.

  1. Schwinn backpedaling

    By Jennifer Harper THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Men of a certain age who relish the memory of their old
    Schwinn "banana seat" bike may want to pull a wheelie:
    The company has reintroduced this two-wheeled icon of
    the 1960s. Schwinn introduced the reinvented Sting-Ray
    bicycle in Madison, Wis., yesterday, billing it "The
    Rebirth of Cool." The bike is unabashedly a relic from
    the all-American playground. "With its raked-out fork,
    knees-to-the-breeze seat position, a huge rear tire and
    enough bad-boy character to raise eyebrows, this is no
    ordinary bicycle," Schwinn says. Schwinn received design
    advice from Orange County Choppers, the New York-based
    custom motorcycle shop whose work has been inspired by
    the films "Easy Rider" and "The Wild One." The shop is
    busy working on a line of special edition Sting-Rays,
    complete with fancy logos and extreme features. There is
    also talk of adult-size Sting-Ray bikes as well, sure to
    cause a stir on the typical Sunday morning bike path.
    "The new Sting-Ray is for the kid who wants a bike that
    offers the riding experience of a chopper," said Schwinn
    spokesman Joe Werwie. "Just like the original model,
    every kid can customize his Sting-Ray with cool
    accessories coming soon like custom wheels, high-back
    sissy bars, over-sized chain guards and more," he said.
    Ironically, the Sting-Ray, along with a few other
    youthful playtime icons, has lost its American roots.
    Schwinn's parent company, Pacific Cycle — which also
    owns Flexible Flyer sleds and Murray, Roadmaster, GT and
    Mongoose bikes — was sold to Montreal-based Dorel
    Industries in February. Nevertheless, the newfangled Sting-
    Ray could inspire a little old-fashioned father-son
    bonding. "You react to this style bike the way you do to
    a muscle car. And men who had a bike like this in the
    late 1960s and 1970s can share their enthusiasm with
    their own sons," said Carl Burgwardt, curator of the
    Pedaling History Bicycle Museum in Orchard Park, N.Y.
    The original Sting-Ray was introduced in 1963 when GTOs
    and Corvettes were the masculine cars of choice, though
    TV's mild-mannered Captain Kangaroo became an official
    endorser three years later, pronouncing, "Schwinn bikes
    are the best." Schwinn sold about 1 million Sting-Rays a
    year until 1982, when young riders began answering the
    edgy siren call of mountain biking. But nostalgia is
    part of the appeal of bikes. Everyone remembers what he
    or she rode as a child, creating an instant market for
    manufacturers who originally built a youthful dream
    machine. "This isn't Schwinn's first repop, or reissue,"
    Mr. Burgwardt said. "They came out with a reissue of
    their old 1950s Black Phantom model. Columbia and
    Roadmaster also reissued some of their old models, too."
    But a reissue does not necessarily make a collectible
    for those who will shell out an average $2,000 for a 40-year-
    old child's bike with original chrome, wheelie bar and a
    glitter seat. "You don't create a collectible bike. They
    just happen," Mr. Burgwardt said. The new Sting-Ray will
    be on sale in stores such as Wal-Mart and Toys R Us by
    April, with prices beginning at $180.
     
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  2. Curt

    Curt Guest

    > The new Sting-Ray will be on sale in stores such as
    > Wal-Mart and Toys
    R Us
    > by April, with prices beginning at $180.

    WTF, $180 for a kids bike. Yeah, there is only 4%
    inflation....right.

    Curt
     
  3. Even the price is nostalgic (somewhat...)!

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    "May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear
    for the hills!"

    Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    Chris'Z Corner http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  4. B A R R Y

    B A R R Y Guest

    On Fri, 19 Mar 2004 23:42:48 GMT, "curt" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >WTF, $180 for a kids bike. Yeah, there is only 4%
    >inflation....right.
    >
    >Curt

    Have you priced kid's bikes in your LBS lately?

    $180 is smack in the middle of the range for a _quality_
    kid's bike.

    For that matter, have you priced video games lately? <G>
    Check out the prices on PS2's, X Boxes, etc... People drop
    this kind of coin on kids all the time.

    Barry
     
  5. Steven Gee

    Steven Gee Guest

    WTHeck, A "Schwinn" at WalMart ? Think of the bozo who will
    assemble it, or worse the person that will assemble it at
    home with an adjustable wrench, screwdriver and a hammer.
    This is not your Father's Schwinn.

    Steve

    "curt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > The new Sting-Ray will be on sale in stores such as
    > > Wal-Mart and Toys
    > R Us
    > > by April, with prices beginning at $180.
    >
    > WTF, $180 for a kids bike. Yeah, there is only 4%
    > inflation....right.
    >
    > Curt
     
  6. carlfogel

    carlfogel New Member

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    Dear Steve,

    No, your father's Schwinn has been replaced by
    the Fury Roadmaster, $53.73 plus tax at RawMalt.

    Given the cost, I can't find much fault with it yet on
    my daily 4-mile test rides.

    We have a civilized arrangement. I don't weigh it
    (or at least don't publish the figure), and it doesn't
    mention how long it's been since I was in its intended
    10-17 age group.

    Carl Fogel
     
  7. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Steven Gee wrote:

    > WTHeck, A "Schwinn" at WalMart ? Think of the bozo who
    > will assemble it, or worse the person that will assemble
    > it at home with an adjustable wrench, screwdriver and a
    > hammer. This is not your Father's Schwinn.

    Wait until the $99.99 Paramount comes out. :(

    --
    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities (Illinois Side)
     
  8. Waldo

    Waldo New Member

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    I like that Pacific is introducing a Schwinn in the mass retail channels and then expects the LBS to pick up the exact same bike. Yeah, I'm sure Wally World will be paying what we are for the bikes...
    Then they're going to reveal the adult Sting-Ray that they expect the LBS to sell; it's designed in conjunction with the OCC boys.
    Schwinn is dead to me.
     
  9. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Fri, 19 Mar 2004 22:19:28 +0000, Garrison Hilliard
    <[email protected]> quoted a source thusly:

    > "The shop is busy working on a line of special edition
    > Sting-Rays, complete with fancy logos and extreme
    > features. There is also talk of adult-size Sting-Ray
    > bikes as well, sure to cause a stir on the typical
    > Sunday morning bike path."

    Oh, great, just what we don't need; another looks-cool way
    to attract people who are more interested in image than
    riding. Image is a fashion thing, and its life expectancy is
    finite; for long-term gains, build on substance, not style.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  10. carlfogel

    carlfogel New Member

    Joined:
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    Dear Werehatrack,

    Ah, another fearless stand in favor of substance
    over style and fashion!

    I look forward to creating this "stir on the typical
    Sunday morning bike path" as I pedal past on my
    "looks-cool" Fury Roadmaster:

    "Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of
    vanities; all is vanity."

    My, look at all these tightly twisted knickers!

    Style-not-substance Fogel
     
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