Schwinn + Bottom Bracket

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ed_Zep, Jul 30, 2004.

  1. Ed_Zep

    Ed_Zep Guest

    I have a Schwinn Voyageur AL, about a year old.

    The pedals aren't turning freely, so I guess the bottom bracket bearing has gone.

    Anyone know if these are standard and also whether they're easy to replace?

    Cheers.

    Ed.
     
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  2. Group: rec.bicycles.misc Date: Fri, Jul 30, 2004, 12:21am (EDT-3) From:
    [email protected] (Ed_Zep) :

    >I have a Schwinn Voyageur AL, about a
    >year old.


    >The pedals aren't turning freely, so I
    >guess the bottom bracket bearing has
    >gone.


    >Anyone know if these are standard and
    >also whether they're easy to replace?


    >Cheers.
    >Ed.


    Since you mentioned the BB (Bottom Bracket) I assume you mean the cranks
    won't turn. I have never heard of a BB "freezing up", unless the bike
    has been so neglected that everything has rusted in place. I doubt you
    have left it in the yard for two or three years!

    My guess is that your machine was equipped with a lower quality BB which
    the factory has packed with that strange grease that tends to
    crystallize after a year or so. Best bet, if you are unable to take it
    apart and examine/repack it yourself is to take it to your LBS (Local
    Bike Shop) and have them take it apart and re-grease or replace it as
    necessary.

    In most cases (except the aforementioned type of neglect) this will
    solve the problem. BBs are very easy to service and replace assuming
    some basic mechanical knowledge and the correct tools. If your LBS is
    the friendly, helpful type, ask him or her to show you how to perform
    some basic preventative maintenance.

    - -

    "May you have the wind at your back.
    And a really low gear for the hills!"

    Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    Chris'Z Corner
    http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  3. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 12:54:54 -0400, Chris Zacho "The Wheelman" wrote:

    > My guess is that your machine was equipped with a lower quality BB which
    > the factory has packed with that strange grease that tends to crystallize
    > after a year or so


    a 5 second google shows that this bike is equipped with a shimano sealed
    cartridge BB. These shouldn't go titsup in a year--I'd call the bike shop
    and demand a new one (nicely) or get the special removal tool and a
    replacement and do it yourself. Easy.But shouldn't have to be done on such
    a young BB--is there anything else you neglected to mention?
     
  4. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 12:54:54 -0400, Chris Zacho "The Wheelman" wrote:
    >
    > a 5 second google shows that this bike is equipped with a shimano sealed
    > cartridge BB. These shouldn't go titsup in a year--I'd call the bike shop
    > and demand a new one (nicely) or get the special removal tool and a
    > replacement and do it yourself. Easy.But shouldn't have to be done on such
    > a young BB--is there anything else you neglected to mention?


    I had a Shimano sealed cartridge BB go out after a year on a Raleigh SC40
    (about a $300 comfort bike). I turned with difficulty on the bike, and
    couldn't be turned at all by hand when removed.

    This was the bike I used in the winter in Chicago, so it had a steady dose
    of road salt and freeze/thaw cycles. When I posted on this, I got a few
    replies from the other Icebikers that suggested this was not all that
    unusual for a winter bike. I ordered a replacement from my LBS.

    However, while I was waiting for a replacement I tried the following "cure",
    which worked well enough:

    1. I immersed the entire cartridge in hot water + dish soap for about an
    hour to get the salt or whatever out of it.
    2. I tried to get all the water out of it as best I could (considering it's
    sealed) -- shaking, putting a hair dryer on it, etc.
    3. I immersed the entire cartridge in a jar of motor oil for about an hour,
    was able to turn it, left it in longer, turned it, left it in longer. I did
    not attempt to remove the motor oil from inside the bracket.

    Another icebike poster had been successful just doing step #3.

    The BB then turned freely and I was able to use it for a few days until the
    new one arrived. I figured I was safer installing the new one.

    Side complaint: On a bike like this, I really don't see the point to the
    sealed bearings. They don't seem to last longer. They aren't serviceable,
    and they are much more expensive to replace. I guess they must save more
    money in factory labor costs than the extra cost of the parts.

    --
    Mike Kruger
    *If God ever does descend from heaven to reveal His divine glory, I hope He
    doesn't land in Orlando, because that place is already WAY too
    touristy.(Tommy Jack)*
     
  5. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Sat, 31 Jul 2004 10:06:59 -0500, Mike Kruger wrote:

    > I had a Shimano sealed cartridge BB go out after a year on a Raleigh SC40
    > (about a $300 comfort bike). I turned with difficulty on the bike, and
    > couldn't be turned at all by hand when removed.
    >
    > This was the bike I used in the winter in Chicago, so it had a steady dose
    > of road salt and freeze/thaw cycles


    I biked for three winters in Chicago on a Marin San Anselmo Nexus7 with
    fenders--the salt got to the front hub and it needed repacking after a
    year, but the BB was going strong at the time it was "borrowed"

    I guess I have the fenders to thank.
     
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