Schwinn brand tires

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Archer, Apr 18, 2003.

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  1. Archer

    Archer Guest

    I have an old (20 yrs +) Schwinn LeTour. I've had it for about 20 yrs, and got it used. AFAIK, it
    still has the original tires; I know I've never changed them. Now that I've started riding more, the
    tires are getting worn down. Not to the casing yet, but starting to show a flat spot on the tread
    crown. The tire says for (IIRC) Scwinn K-2 or S-6 rim.

    What are the chances of finding a modern clincher tire to fit this rim when the current tire finally
    gives out? Or am I going to have to buy new rims to continue to ride this bike?

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
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  2. Josh Gatts

    Josh Gatts Guest

    "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have an old (20 yrs +) Schwinn LeTour. I've had it for about 20 yrs, and got it used. AFAIK, it
    > still has the original tires; I know I've never changed them. Now that I've started riding more,
    > the tires are getting worn down. Not to the casing yet, but starting to show a flat spot on the
    > tread crown. The tire says for (IIRC) Scwinn K-2 or S-6 rim.
    >
    > What are the chances of finding a modern clincher tire to fit this rim when the current tire
    > finally gives out? Or am I going to have to buy new rims to continue to ride this bike?
    >
    >

    They're likely 27" tires, which are still easy to find. Your LBS probably has them, Wal-Mart
    probably has them, and Nashbar definitely has them. I have these on my Motobecane:

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=121&subcategory=1085&brand=&sku=
    2454&storetype=&estoreid=

    I like them, and it's hard to beat the price!

    Josh
     
  3. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, news- [email protected] says...
    > "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I have an old (20 yrs +) Schwinn LeTour. I've had it for about 20 yrs, and got it used. AFAIK,
    > > it still has the original tires; I know I've never changed them. Now that I've started riding
    > > more, the tires are getting worn down. Not to the casing yet, but starting to show a flat spot
    > > on the tread crown. The tire says for (IIRC) Scwinn K-2 or S-6 rim.
    > >
    > > What are the chances of finding a modern clincher tire to fit this rim when the current tire
    > > finally gives out? Or am I going to have to buy new rims to continue to ride this bike?
    > >
    > >
    >
    > They're likely 27" tires, which are still easy to find. Your LBS probably

    Yes, they are 27x1.25" tires, but someone told me (and it sounds familiar from my youth days) that
    Schwinn tires and rims of that era were incompatible with the standard ones. Anybody know anything
    about that?

    > has them, Wal-Mart probably has them, and Nashbar definitely has them. I have these on my
    > Motobecane:
    >
    > http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=121&subcategory=1085&brand=&sku=
    > 2454&storetype=&estoreid=
    >
    > I like them, and it's hard to beat the price!

    Thanks for the reference!

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  4. Peter

    Peter Guest

    archer wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, news- [email protected] says...

    >>They're likely 27" tires, which are still easy to find. Your LBS probably
    >
    >
    > Yes, they are 27x1.25" tires, but someone told me (and it sounds familiar from my youth days) that
    > Schwinn tires and rims of that era were incompatible with the standard ones. Anybody know anything
    > about that?

    Schwinn's 27" tires were the same as everyone else's and you shouldn't have any trouble finding
    replacements.

    Their 26" tires were different from most others. Schwinn's were labeled as 26 x 1 3/4 or other
    fractional width whereas other 26" tires at the time were labeled 26 x 1.75 or other decimal width.
    Of course in math class I had learned that 1.75 = 1 3/4, so I confidently bought the 1.75" tire as a
    replacement for my Schwinn bike and spent the next two hours struggling to get the thing mounted on
    the rim. Finally took it back to the store and learned that decimal and fractional values are not so
    interchangeable in tire sizes and that the rim diameter is a little bigger when the width is given
    in fractional form.
     
  5. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > archer wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>, news- [email protected] says...
    >
    > >>They're likely 27" tires, which are still easy to find. Your LBS probably
    > >
    > >
    > > Yes, they are 27x1.25" tires, but someone told me (and it sounds familiar from my youth days)
    > > that Schwinn tires and rims of that era were incompatible with the standard ones. Anybody know
    > > anything about that?
    >
    > Schwinn's 27" tires were the same as everyone else's and you shouldn't have any trouble finding
    > replacements.
    >
    > Their 26" tires were different from most others. Schwinn's were labeled as 26 x 1 3/4 or other
    > fractional width whereas other 26" tires at the time were labeled 26 x 1.75 or other decimal
    > width. Of course in math class I had learned that 1.75 = 1 3/4, so I confidently bought the 1.75"
    > tire as a replacement for my Schwinn bike and spent the next two hours struggling to get the thing
    > mounted on the rim. Finally took it back to the store and learned that decimal and fractional
    > values are not so interchangeable in tire sizes and that the rim diameter is a little bigger when
    > the width is given in fractional form.

    Thanks for the clarification; it's a relief to know I won't have to search the entire country for
    replacements, or buy new rims when my current tires wear out!

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  6. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    archer <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have an old (20 yrs +) Schwinn LeTour. I've had it for about 20 yrs, and got it used. AFAIK, it
    > still has the original tires; I know I've never changed them. Now that I've started riding more,
    > the tires are getting worn down. Not to the casing yet, but starting to show a flat spot on the
    > tread crown. The tire says for (IIRC) Scwinn K-2 or S-6 rim.
    >
    > What are the chances of finding a modern clincher tire to fit this rim when the current tire
    > finally gives out? Or am I going to have to buy new rims to continue to ride this bike?

    You should have no problem getting tires for this bike. The LeTour range used 27 x 1 1/4" tires-
    very common for the era and still available from many sources. Here's a list from bikepartsusa.com:
    http://www.bikepartsusa.com/view.phtml?f_c=Tire&f_c2=27+inch

    Jeff
     
  7. Jim Feeley

    Jim Feeley Guest

    > "Yes, they are 27x1.25" tires, but someone told me (and it sounds familiar from my youth days)
    > that Schwinn tires and rims of that era were incompatible with the standard ones. Anybody know
    > anything about that?"

    A long time ago I worked at a Schwinn shop. As I recall, the tires on Schwinn Varsity bikes, amongst
    others, had a unique Schwinn tire size. But LeTours were meant to compete with cheap Peugeot,
    Motobecane, and Ralieghs (geez, did I even spell those right?). In fact, they were imported from
    Japan and not made in Chicago.

    So anyway, I'm 98% sure Le Tours had standard Japanese parts, and thus 27-inch tires.

    Jim
     
  8. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have an old (20 yrs +) Schwinn LeTour. I've had it for about 20 yrs, and got it used. AFAIK, it
    > still has the original tires; I know I've never changed them. Now that I've started riding more,
    > the tires are getting worn down. Not to the casing yet, but starting to show a flat spot on the
    > tread crown. The tire says for (IIRC) Scwinn K-2 or S-6 rim.
    >
    > What are the chances of finding a modern clincher tire to fit this rim when the current tire
    > finally gives out? Or am I going to have to buy new rims to continue to ride this bike?

    K2 is nomenclature from the British system of tire sizing. It is also known as 27x1-1/4" . The ISO
    size is -622. All of thos eare equivalent names s to describe the same thing.

    Schwinn rolled their own rims ( or had them made to Schwinn's spec) and so in a given standard size
    they offered various shapes and sections. S-6 is one of their rim designs and does not describe a
    tire size, just a rim style. Put another way, a rim could be aero style or not aero style in any
    given size and Schwinn S-6 rim style was available in several diameters.

    The good news for you is that any competent LBS who services bicycles will have a selection of tires
    to fit your rims ranging from under ten dollars to about twenty. Ask for twenty seven inch tires.
    The inner tube box will be labelled 27x1-1/4 and also 700-35/38. Inner tubes are stretchy enough to
    cover that slight diameter difference.

    Mounting tires, especially high pressure tires, on steel rims is dicey sometimes. Spray a mist of
    Pledge or similar on the rim before mounting and ensure the raised line just above the brake surface
    is equally visible all around at about 40psi before airing the tire fully.

    Our FAQ is also useful for mounting tires.
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  9. Peter

    Peter Guest

    A Muzi wrote:
    > "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>I have an old (20 yrs +) Schwinn LeTour. I've had it for about 20 yrs, and got it used. AFAIK, it
    >>still has the original tires; I know I've never changed them. Now that I've started riding more,
    >>the tires are getting worn down. Not to the casing yet, but starting to show a flat spot on the
    >>tread crown. The tire says for (IIRC) Scwinn K-2 or S-6 rim.
    >>
    >>What are the chances of finding a modern clincher tire to fit this rim when the current tire
    >>finally gives out? Or am I going to have to buy new rims to continue to ride this bike?
    >
    >
    >
    > K2 is nomenclature from the British system of tire sizing. It is also known as 27x1-1/4" . The ISO
    > size is -622.
    ^ 630

    > Mounting tires, especially high pressure tires, on steel rims is dicey sometimes.

    If these are the original rims that came with the LeTour then they are aluminum.
     
  10. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Yes, they are 27x1.25" tires, but someone told me (and it sounds familiar from my youth days) that
    > Schwinn tires and rims of that era were incompatible with the standard ones. Anybody know anything
    > about that?

    In the rest of the world 1-1/4 is the same as 1.25 but not here . In bicycle tires, fractions and
    decimals denote different series of rims/tires.
    26x1.75 is 559mm diameter but 26x1-3/4 is 584mm diameter, f'rinstance. Schwinn used some very
    unusual tires, such as that 26x1-3/4 584 size. Their popular lightweights* used
    26x1-3/8x1-1/4 EA1 tires at 597mm which are maddeningly close to, but not interchangeable
    with, the standard British size 26x1-3/8x1-5/8 EA3 at 590mm. That's why the "common wisdom"
    is that Schwinns are different. Not all Schwinns are odd - tghe 27" size was a popular
    worldwide standard in the era.

    * in classic bike industry parlance, 1.75 are "middleweights" and 1-3/8 are "lightweights".

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  11. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > "Yes, they are 27x1.25" tires, but someone told me (and it sounds familiar from my youth days)
    > > that Schwinn tires and rims of that era were incompatible with the standard ones. Anybody know
    > > anything about that?"

    "Jim Feeley" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:180420031805489130%[email protected]...
    > A long time ago I worked at a Schwinn shop. As I recall, the tires on Schwinn Varsity bikes,
    > amongst others, had a unique Schwinn tire size. But LeTours were meant to compete with cheap
    > Peugeot, Motobecane, and Ralieghs (geez, did I even spell those right?). In fact, they were
    > imported from Japan and not made in Chicago.
    >
    > So anyway, I'm 98% sure Le Tours had standard Japanese parts, and thus 27-inch tires.

    I also wrenched at a Schwinn dealership. Varsity and Le Tour both used the same K2 27x1-1/4
    tires/rims

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  12. Jim Feeley

    Jim Feeley Guest

    A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > So anyway, I'm 98% sure Le Tours had standard Japanese parts, and thus 27-inch tires.
    >
    > I also wrenched at a Schwinn dealership. Varsity and Le Tour both used the same K2 27x1-1/4
    > tires/rims

    Well I defer to Andrew, of course. It's been a while, and I've repressed lots of bad memories...

    Thanks,

    Jim
     
  13. Menotomy

    Menotomy Guest

    We carry them. They're not original Schwinn but they're brand new and made for Schwinn S6 rims. They
    are on this page:

    http://oldroads.com/fs_tire.html

    Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc. http://OldRoads.com

    >I have an old (20 yrs +) Schwinn LeTour. I've had it for about 20 yrs, and got it used. AFAIK, it
    >still has the original tires; I know I've never changed them. Now that I've started riding more,
    >the tires are getting worn down. Not to the casing yet, but starting to show a flat spot on the
    >tread crown. The tire says for (IIRC) Scwinn K-2 or S-6 rim.
    >
    >What are the chances of finding a modern clincher tire to fit this rim when the current tire
    >finally gives out? Or am I going to have to buy new rims to continue to ride this bike?
    >
    >--
     
  14. Menotomy

    Menotomy Guest

    Oops, I should have read further. I thought you were looking for 26" S6 tires.

    Schwinn made their 20, 24 and 26" tires in a unique size so they'd get follow-on parts business.
    Kinda like "give them the razor, but sell them the blades".

    Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles, Inc. http://OldRoads.com

    >27 x 1 1/4
     
  15. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > A Muzi wrote:
    > > "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>I have an old (20 yrs +) Schwinn LeTour. I've had it for about 20 yrs, and got it used. AFAIK,
    > >>it still has the original tires; I know I've never changed them. Now that I've started riding
    > >>more, the tires are getting worn down. Not to the casing yet, but starting to show a flat spot
    > >>on the tread crown. The tire says for (IIRC) Scwinn K-2 or S-6
    rim.
    > >>
    > >>What are the chances of finding a modern clincher tire to fit this rim when the current tire
    > >>finally gives out? Or am I going to have to buy new rims to continue to ride this bike?
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > K2 is nomenclature from the British system of tire sizing. It is also
    known
    > > as 27x1-1/4" . The ISO size is -622.
    > ^ 630
    >
    > > Mounting tires, especially high pressure tires, on steel rims is dicey sometimes.

    "Peter" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > If these are the original rims that came with the LeTour then they are aluminum.

    Maybe, maybe not. According to my Schwinn catalog file, the LeTour has Araya steel rims, Super
    LeTour with aluminum Arayas. (I work on one of these bikes virtually every day, dented steel
    rims and all)

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  16. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > "Peter" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > If these are the original rims that came with the LeTour then they are aluminum.
    >
    > Maybe, maybe not. According to my Schwinn catalog file, the LeTour has Araya steel rims, Super
    > LeTour with aluminum Arayas. (I work on one of these bikes virtually every day, dented steel rims
    > and all)

    Same here- and my first "ten-speed" was a LeTour III- it had steel Araya rims. The Super LeTour
    models were the next step up, and they had Araya or Weinmann aluminum rims. All of them were
    27", not 700C.

    Jeff
     
  17. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > A Muzi wrote:
    > > > "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > >>I have an old (20 yrs +) Schwinn LeTour. I've had it for about 20 yrs, and got it used. AFAIK,
    > > >>it still has the original tires; I know I've never changed them. Now that I've started riding
    > > >>more, the tires are getting worn down. Not to the casing yet, but starting to show a flat spot
    > > >>on the tread crown. The tire says for (IIRC) Scwinn K-2 or S-6
    > rim.
    > > >>
    > > >>What are the chances of finding a modern clincher tire to fit this rim when the current tire
    > > >>finally gives out? Or am I going to have to buy new rims to continue to ride this bike?
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > K2 is nomenclature from the British system of tire sizing. It is also
    > known
    > > > as 27x1-1/4" . The ISO size is -622.
    > > ^ 630
    > >
    > > > Mounting tires, especially high pressure tires, on steel rims is dicey sometimes.
    >
    >
    > "Peter" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > If these are the original rims that came with the LeTour then they are aluminum.
    >
    > Maybe, maybe not. According to my Schwinn catalog file, the LeTour has Araya steel rims, Super
    > LeTour with aluminum Arayas. (I work on one of these bikes virtually every day, dented steel rims
    > and all)

    Speaking of dented steel rims, is it possible and safe to beat an outward-pointing dent back
    flat? Maybe with a piece of wood and a hammer? I have one spot on my back rim which is dented
    outward slightly.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  18. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > > > "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > >>I have an old (20 yrs +) Schwinn LeTour. I've had it for about 20
    yrs,
    > > > >>and got it used. AFAIK, it still has the original tires; I know
    I've
    > > > >>never changed them. Now that I've started riding more, the tires
    are
    > > > >>getting worn down. Not to the casing yet, but starting to show a
    flat
    > > > >>spot on the tread crown. The tire says for (IIRC) Scwinn K-2 or S-6
    > > rim.
    > > > >>
    > > > >>What are the chances of finding a modern clincher tire to fit this
    rim
    > > > >>when the current tire finally gives out? Or am I going to have to
    buy
    > > > >>new rims to continue to ride this bike?

    (am)> > > > K2 is nomenclature from the British system of tire sizing. It is also
    > > known
    > > > > as 27x1-1/4" . The ISO size is -622.
    > > > ^ 630
    > > >
    > > > > Mounting tires, especially high pressure tires, on steel rims is
    dicey
    > > > > sometimes.

    > > "Peter" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > If these are the original rims that came with the LeTour then they are aluminum.

    (am)> > Maybe, maybe not. According to my Schwinn catalog file, the LeTour has Araya
    > > steel rims, Super LeTour with aluminum Arayas. (I work on one of these bikes virtually every
    > > day, dented steel rims and all)

    "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Speaking of dented steel rims, is it possible and safe to beat an outward-pointing dent back flat?
    > Maybe with a piece of wood and a hammer? I have one spot on my back rim which is dented outward
    > slightly.

    Sure. If you are good with a hammer ( I used to run an auto body shop) on steel panels, go for it.
    Using a vise or a plier with a flat piece of steel or wood on the other side ( so you don't make an
    inward dent) is a good technique for those who prudently shy away from using a hammer.

    You'll notice that a wheel with a dent will develop a skid mark on the tire as the brake grabs
    momentarily at the dent.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971x
     
  19. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Speaking of dented steel rims, is it possible and safe to beat an outward-pointing dent back
    > > flat? Maybe with a piece of wood and a hammer? I have one spot on my back rim which is dented
    > > outward slightly.
    >
    > Sure. If you are good with a hammer ( I used to run an auto body shop) on steel panels, go for it.
    > Using a vise or a plier with a flat piece of steel or wood on the other side ( so you don't make
    > an inward dent) is a good technique for those who prudently shy away from using a hammer.
    >
    > You'll notice that a wheel with a dent will develop a skid mark on the tire as the brake grabs
    > momentarily at the dent.

    Thanks for the confirmation; I'll give a (careful) go.

    This dent is small enough, and I'm easy enough on the brakes that I don't usually lock it there, but
    occasionally I do. My son wore a tire through to the cords while still leaving lots of tread on the
    rest of the tire, before I knew he had put a dent in the rim.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
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