Schwinn Comfort bike...any good?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Your Welcome, Mar 29, 2003.

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  1. Your Welcome

    Your Welcome Guest

    I'm just looking for something to ride me to and fro work monday to friday. The price is about
    right. Initially I was going to buy the cheapest supercycle for $109 but this has an aluminum frame:

    Schwinn Comfort Bike

    A great bike for commuting to work and for casual weekend riders.

    Lightweight aluminum frame with comfort geometry for upright riding position RST alloy comfort
    suspension fork Shimano Tourney front and rear derailleurs 21-speed SRAM MRX indexed grip shifters
    Suspension seat post, adjustable stem and alloy V-type brakes 18" frame 2-tone colouring (blue and
    silver) We recommend bikes be professionally assembled

    $329 CDN

    http://www.canadiantire.ca/assortments/product_detail.jsp?bmUID= 1048959640446

    What do you think about the other adult bikes at canadian tire?
     
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  2. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "Your Welcome" wrote:
    > I'm just looking for something to ride me to and fro work monday to friday. The price is
    > about right. Initially I was going to buy the cheapest supercycle for $109 but this has an
    > aluminum frame:
    >
    > Schwinn Comfort Bike
    >
    > A great bike for commuting to work and for casual weekend riders.
    >
    > Lightweight aluminum frame with comfort geometry for upright riding position RST alloy comfort
    > suspension fork Shimano Tourney front and rear derailleurs 21-speed SRAM MRX indexed grip shifters
    > Suspension seat post, adjustable stem and alloy V-type brakes 18" frame 2-tone colouring (blue and
    > silver) We recommend bikes be professionally assembled
    >
    > $329 CDN
    >
    > http://www.canadiantire.ca/assortments/product_detail.jsp?bmUID= 1048959640446
    >
    > What do you think about the other adult bikes at canadian tire?

    Schwinn is perhaps the most recognizable name in the bike industry in North America. Unforfunately,
    the name is the only thing these bikes have in common with the Schwinns of old. In 2001, Schwinn was
    in bankruptcy and was acquired by Pacific Cycles. Since then, "Made in China" Schwinns have appeared
    mostly in places like Walmart.

    http://www.globalaging.org/elderrights/us/schwinn.htm

    http://www.dirtworld.com/articles/news_newsarchive409.htm

    Apparently the bike you mention only comes in one size (18"). Without knowing YOUR size, it's
    impossible to tell if this bike will fit you. It's doubtful that the folks at Canadian Tire have the
    expertise to fit you and set up the bike correctly. Also, the use of a suspension fork on a road
    bike is normally not recommended (it adds weight/cost and is a potential source of failure). Wide
    tires should provide plenty of shock absorbtion.

    I would suggest visiting a good local bike shop. For about the same money, you will get a bike that
    is properly assembled and fitted to you. You're going to be spending a lot of time on that bike. Get
    one that's right for you and that is safe to ride.

    Art Harris
     
  3. Jeb

    Jeb Guest

    On Sun, 30 Mar 2003 13:48:57 GMT, "Harris" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Schwinn Comfort Bike
    >>
    >> A great bike for commuting to work and for casual weekend riders.
    >>
    >> Lightweight aluminum frame with comfort geometry for upright riding position RST alloy comfort
    >> suspension fork Shimano Tourney front and rear derailleurs 21-speed SRAM MRX indexed grip
    >> shifters Suspension seat post, adjustable stem and alloy V-type brakes 18" frame

    snip

    >
    >Schwinn is perhaps the most recognizable name in the bike industry in North America. Unforfunately,
    >the name is the only thing these bikes have in common with the Schwinns of old. In 2001, Schwinn
    >was in bankruptcy and was acquired by Pacific Cycles. Since then, "Made in China" Schwinns have
    >appeared mostly in places like Walmart.
    >
    >Apparently the bike you mention only comes in one size (18"). Without knowing YOUR size, it's
    >impossible to tell if this bike will fit you. It's doubtful that the folks at Canadian Tire have
    >the expertise to fit you and set up the bike correctly. Also, the use of a suspension fork on a
    >road bike is normally not recommended (it adds weight/cost and is a potential source of failure).
    >Wide tires should provide plenty of shock absorbtion.
    >
    >I would suggest visiting a good local bike shop. For about the same money, you will get a bike that
    >is properly assembled and fitted to you. You're going to be spending a lot of time on that bike.
    >Get one that's right for you and that is safe to ride.
    >

    I'll add some comment from a "comfort bike" owner:

    I picked up a similar GT Timberline about a year ago. The upright riding position is a bit more
    comfortable for a non-serious (or aging and a bit chubby like myself) rider but does add a penalty
    if windy or if you like to ride fast. The suspension fork and post are useful unless you have very
    nice roads / trails ... which we don't. They do add weight and maintenance/repair. A purchase from a
    good local bike shop is never a bad idea as they are a very good resource. However I was willing to
    assemble the bike myself and save about 1/2 ($200 US) over local pricing. I've been very happy with
    the upgrade from a well worn Schwinn CrossFit except the crankset appears to have been made from old
    beer cans or something and is shot in something over 1500 miles ... with regular maintenance. I also
    added a sprung/well padded/"big butt" seat from Nashbar. And do get a bike that fits you.
     
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