Schwinn vs Huffy

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by PSB, Dec 28, 2004.

  1. PSB

    PSB Guest

    Learning toward one or the other for buying a new dept store bicycle. I
    know what to look for when it comes to assembling them. The bike is
    going to be used as a commuter. The Huffy's are about 30 dollars cheaper
    and both have Shamino gears. Just curious if I should spend the 30 bucks
    more for a Schwinn or not. If you are going to reply that I should buy
    from an LBS, save your bandwidth.

    So which would you recommend?
     
    Tags:


  2. PSB wrote:
    > Learning toward one or the other for buying a new dept store bicycle.

    I
    > know what to look for when it comes to assembling them. The bike is
    > going to be used as a commuter. The Huffy's are about 30 dollars

    cheaper
    > and both have Shamino gears. Just curious if I should spend the 30

    bucks
    > more for a Schwinn or not. If you are going to reply that I should

    buy
    > from an LBS, save your bandwidth.
    >
    > So which would you recommend?


    Neither. As commuters, they would probably do OK. But they are cheap
    junk, and possibly like throwing money away. If you search in this
    newsgroup for "Carl Fogel" "Roadmaster" and "Fury", you will find the
    saga of a cheap dept. store bike.

    You /should/ buy from your LBS. But not a new bike. A used one. A
    decent, well-maintained, used bike can cost only a bit more than a new
    dept. store bike-shaped toy, and is likely to have better components.
    This means that you might get more life out of your used bike than you
    would out of a new bike-shaped toy from some *Mart.

    Locally, the LBSs have quite a bit of used inventory that they are
    willing to make deals on because in our corner of North America, it's
    winter, and bikes don't sell well here in the winter.
    Good luck.

    HAND,

    E.P.
     
  3. On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 16:47:35 -0500, PSB <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Learning toward one or the other for buying a new dept store bicycle. I
    >know what to look for when it comes to assembling them. The bike is
    >going to be used as a commuter. The Huffy's are about 30 dollars cheaper
    >and both have Shamino gears. Just curious if I should spend the 30 bucks
    >more for a Schwinn or not. If you are going to reply that I should buy
    >from an LBS, save your bandwidth.
    >
    >So which would you recommend?


    Dear Dyslexic PBS,

    I doubt [modest cough] that you will hear from anyone who
    has wasted more time and bandwidth here extolling the
    glories of such value-for-money steeds.

    (I also doubt that anyone will recommend either brand.)

    But I'm pleased with my <$60 Fury RoadMaster from Walmart
    and its fifteen fierce Shamino gears.

    http://www.walmart.com/catalog/prod...=0:4171:61903:61904:4180:4183:5304#long_descr

    As far as I can tell, the Fury rolls four miles along its
    daily route with reasonable splendour, gnashing its teeth as
    befits its name.

    Most two-wheeled objects with pedals do the same.

    Carl Fogel
     
  4. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    My Huffy has 6 years = 48k miles of commuting on it. I haven't
    tried a Schwinn, either the original brand or the current one.

    You can order parts from Huffy for it as well, when they wear out.
    Or if enough wear out at once, just buy a whole new Huffy.

    I generally get 6 years before that happens, and the current one
    looks to be going strong for more years yet.
    --
    Ron Hardin
    [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  5. On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 22:23:02 GMT, Ron Hardin
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My Huffy has 6 years = 48k miles of commuting on it. I haven't
    >tried a Schwinn, either the original brand or the current one.
    >
    >You can order parts from Huffy for it as well, when they wear out.
    >Or if enough wear out at once, just buy a whole new Huffy.
    >
    >I generally get 6 years before that happens, and the current one
    >looks to be going strong for more years yet.


    Dear Ron,

    So much for another of my fearless predictions!

    (I take it that you recommend the Huffy.)

    At around a thousand miles per year, I somehow doubt that
    I'll put 48k miles on the Fury RoadMaster, so now I'll try
    to think of it as a delicate competition machine, the kind
    that racers replace each season for fear of fatigue
    weakening the highly-stressed frame.

    Do you remember what your Huffy cost?

    Carl Fogel
     
  6. If the Schwinn has a frame mounted derailleur go that
    way you won't regret it.

    I MTB 2004
     
  7. > Learning toward one or the other for buying a new dept store bicycle. I
    > know what to look for when it comes to assembling them. The bike is going
    > to be used as a commuter. The Huffy's are about 30 dollars cheaper and
    > both have Shamino gears. Just curious if I should spend the 30 bucks more
    > for a Schwinn or not. If you are going to reply that I should buy from an
    > LBS, save your bandwidth.
    >
    > So which would you recommend?


    Bandwith is cheap, sorry. Look for a decent used bike. You could probably
    find one for nearly free at a garage sale or thrift shop that would be far
    better than the Huffy or Schwinn from a department store. If you have the
    skills to properly assemble a bike, you can probably easily deal with a used
    bike, and recognize a real gem that's there for the taking.

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    IMBA, BikesBelong, NBDA member
     
  8. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    Bicycling did a comparison of a bike shop Schwinn and a WalMart Schwinn.
    Their consensus was the Wal-Schwinn wasn't nearly as nice as a low end LBS
    Schwinn, but it was still the best department store bike ever. Caveat
    emptor!
     
  9. PSB

    PSB Guest

    Ron Hardin wrote:
    > I generally get 6 years before that happens, and the current one
    > looks to be going strong for more years yet.


    I was hoping you would ring in Ron.

    The thing about the Huffy I was looking at has knobby tires. The Schwinn
    didn't have knobbies.

    What do you recommend Ron, knobbies or slicks?

    Thanks.
     
  10. Cyclist14

    Cyclist14 New Member

    Joined:
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    I recommend slicks for a commute but if you also want to ride a MTB trail ocassionally get knobbies.

    I ride 200 miles a week and I am going to begin my racing career soon.:cool:

    I have to go now so I can train.:D
     
  11. Kenny

    Kenny Guest

    PSB wrote:
    > Learning toward one or the other for buying a new dept store bicycle. I
    > know what to look for when it comes to assembling them. The bike is
    > going to be used as a commuter. The Huffy's are about 30 dollars cheaper
    > and both have Shamino gears. Just curious if I should spend the 30 bucks
    > more for a Schwinn or not. If you are going to reply that I should buy
    > from an LBS, save your bandwidth.
    >
    > So which would you recommend?


    For my commuter (two chainring 5 speed) I bought the cheapest one I
    could find. It cost me $50 and for 4 bucks more I put a shopping basket
    on it. It also came with a rear rack for panniers. Been using it for 4
    years. For low, low end go on price.

    Kenny
     
  12. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles wrote:

    > Bandwith is cheap, sorry. Look for a decent used bike. You could probably
    > find one for nearly free at a garage sale or thrift shop that would be far
    > better than the Huffy or Schwinn from a department store. If you have the
    > skills to properly assemble a bike, you can probably easily deal with a used
    > bike, and recognize a real gem that's there for the taking.


    I know someone who purchased a lugged steel frame Trek with near perfect
    paint for $10 at a yard sale.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Near Rock Island
     
  13. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 16:47:35 -0500, PSB <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Learning toward one or the other for buying a new dept store bicycle. I
    >know what to look for when it comes to assembling them. The bike is
    >going to be used as a commuter. The Huffy's are about 30 dollars cheaper
    >and both have Shamino gears. Just curious if I should spend the 30 bucks
    >more for a Schwinn or not. If you are going to reply that I should buy
    >from an LBS, save your bandwidth.
    >
    >So which would you recommend?


    Schwinn, because Huffy's in bankruptcy at the moment.

    For a commuter bike, though, I'd look at the rest of the Pacific bike
    lines as well. (Schwinn got borged by Pacific a while back, as did
    Mongoose and several other brands.)

    One of the regulars here may chime in with an observation that a $60
    Roadmaster Mt Fury may very well serve your purposes just as well; the
    empirical evidence here pretty much confirms the observation that even
    the cheapest of the Mall-Wart units will stand up well under a daily
    commute of a reasonable distance...as long as your demands in terms of
    comfort and performance are modest[1]. (The former issue can often be
    addressed by swapping seats, and the latter is presumed not to be a
    concern given the parameters that you appear to be applying.)



    [1] I will add one caveat of my own from direct experience, though;
    if you weigh more than 180 lbs, and you buy a cheap unit, expect to
    have to change the seat immediately due to the absolutely abysmal
    mounting clamps used on most of the Marianas-trench-level bikes as
    original equipment. Oh, and have Captain Overtorque tighten the seat
    mounting clamp if you value your baritone singing voice.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  14. >> Bandwith is cheap, sorry. Look for a decent used bike. You could probably
    >> find one for nearly free at a garage sale or thrift shop that would be
    >> far better than the Huffy or Schwinn from a department store. If you have
    >> the skills to properly assemble a bike, you can probably easily deal with
    >> a used bike, and recognize a real gem that's there for the taking.

    >
    > I know someone who purchased a lugged steel frame Trek with near perfect
    > paint for $10 at a yard sale.


    And isn't there something noble about giving a bike like that a new lease on
    life? But I'm beginning to suspect this is a troll, given the recent remark
    from the original poster regarding knobby vs slick tires for a "commute"
    bike.

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    IMBA, BikesBelong, NBDA member
     
  15. I took a close look at a department store Schwinn a month ago,

    http://search.bikelist.org/query.as...?"&[email protected]&SortBy=MsgDate[a]

    Specifically, the $108 schwinn hybrid at Target. Unlike earlier
    department store bikes that had obvious manufacturing compromises
    (e.g. cheap soft steel brakes that bent every time they were used,
    steel rims, lead-pipe frames, suicide extension levers), modern
    dept. store bikes have closed a tremendous gap with bike shop bikes.

    Although I don't own one, these bikes are probably not fun or
    practical to work on or tune. They are designed to be manufactured
    cheaply, used until the parts fail or go out of the adjustment, and
    then thrown away. Don't expect to get it fixed cheaply at a normal
    bike shop. Work on it yourself, if at all.

    Here is the best summary about "where are the bodies buried" on the
    cheaper department store bikes of today :

    http://search.bikelist.org/getmsg.asp?Filename=internet-bob.10411.2094.eml

    With the US$ trading for 8 chinese yuan, and the average chinese
    worker in the countryside earning $0.65 per hour, you may not see a
    bike of this quality sold this cheaply another time for the rest of
    your life.

    If you buy, purchase the best model available, with all-aluminum parts.

    - Don Gillies
    San Diego, CA
     
  16. PSB

    PSB Guest

    Hi Carl, just curious to how well the thumb shifters on the Mountain
    Fury act. Have you had problems with them getting loose? I thought about
    getting this bike and perhaps changing the tires to slicks. I didn't
    like the seat on the Fury but I got a good saddle from my old bike.

    I'm also curious since nearly all my riding will be on roads or dirt
    roads, will slicks give a much smoother ride than knobbies?

    Thanks.
     
  17. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 19:34:03 -0600, Tom Sherman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles wrote:
    >
    >> Bandwith is cheap, sorry. Look for a decent used bike. You could probably
    >> find one for nearly free at a garage sale or thrift shop that would be far
    >> better than the Huffy or Schwinn from a department store. If you have the
    >> skills to properly assemble a bike, you can probably easily deal with a used
    >> bike, and recognize a real gem that's there for the taking.

    >
    >I know someone who purchased a lugged steel frame Trek with near perfect
    >paint for $10 at a yard sale.


    A few months ago, I grabbed a group of five bikes for the total sum of
    about $60 at the city auction; the lot included a Miyata Elevation
    1000 that needed just a chain and cassette replaced due to wear. Of
    the other four, two were absolute scrap. Those two were a mid-60s
    drop-frame Schwinn tourer with tires rotted off, and a badly
    ethno-engineered Huffy with a 24" rear wheel and a tireless EA3 front
    wheel on a 559-wheel frame with a complete lack of brakes, shifters
    and seat. The remaining two were reasonably servicable
    department-store-level bikes in almost immediately useful condition; a
    Pacific mtb with a missing dust guard on one front wheel bearing, and
    a Roadmaster Mt Fury (alas, in the 24" size) with the most creatively
    obliterated set of brake calipers I have ever seen. The front
    caliper's arms were devoid of pads and had been twisted in between the
    fork legs (I should mention that the fork had been turned around
    backwards) as though the brakes had been suddenly applied while the
    bike was being towed at high speeds with an overload aboard. Given
    the presence of a trick-bike footpeg on the rear axle, that may be
    exactly what was being done. There was also an impressive amount of
    chain slap damage to the chainstay paint. Despite the apparent abuse,
    however, with the substitution of some less twisted calipers from Le
    Carton Du Junque, it became a useful bike which presently awaits a
    suitable rider.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  18. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 19:42:41 -0500, PSB <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ron Hardin wrote:
    >> I generally get 6 years before that happens, and the current one
    >> looks to be going strong for more years yet.

    >
    >I was hoping you would ring in Ron.
    >
    >The thing about the Huffy I was looking at has knobby tires. The Schwinn
    >didn't have knobbies.
    >
    >What do you recommend Ron, knobbies or slicks?


    For commuting? Slicks! Your wrists, elbows and shoulders will thank
    you for the reduced vibration.

    Note, however, that a pair of slicks for a 26" bike can be had for
    about $15 (maybe less) at Mall-Wart, and they're not hard to install
    on whatever you buy. A slick-tired Mt Fury could be concocted for
    well under $100, even after sales tax.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  19. On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 21:37:59 -0500, PSB <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Hi Carl, just curious to how well the thumb shifters on the Mountain
    >Fury act. Have you had problems with them getting loose? I thought about
    >getting this bike and perhaps changing the tires to slicks. I didn't
    >like the seat on the Fury but I got a good saddle from my old bike.
    >
    >I'm also curious since nearly all my riding will be on roads or dirt
    >roads, will slicks give a much smoother ride than knobbies?
    >
    >Thanks.


    Dear PSB,

    Since the exciting mechanical adventure described in
    merciless detail in this link, loose shifters have not been
    a problem:

    http://groups.google.co.uk/[email protected]&rnum=1
    or http://tinyurl.com/3zpsn

    Generally, the Fury uses high gear after rounding the street
    corner at the neighbor's house.

    I suspect that most department store mountain-style bikes
    can be pedalled around reasonably level towns in high gear
    like a single-speed, with a choice of fourteen or more lower
    gears for any hills. Their high gear is a bit short of a
    53x11 700c.

    After a thousand miles, the Fury Roadmaster was treated to a
    pair of new slicks, which seemed to perk it up about 9%:

    http://groups.google.co.uk/[email protected]&rnum=2
    or http://tinyurl.com/44xm3

    [A hideous typo requires the reader to imagine the word
    "removed" between "already" and "584", somewhat in the
    fashion of Theobald's famous conjecture that "a Table o'
    green fields" was a misprint for "'a babbl'd o' green
    fields":

    http://www.bartleby.com/215/1113.html

    Hmmm . . . I wonder why a quote about babbling came to
    mind?]

    Anyway, the slicks are certainly quieter than the knobbies.
    They're also noticeably smaller, so the engine was forced to
    rev higher.

    Miserable weather set in shortly after the new tires, so
    it's hard to be sure if the original speed improvement has
    outlasted the usual two-week new-toy effect. The Fury
    Roadmaster's engine often shows signs of flagging when it's
    cold and windy.

    Of course, without a cyclocomputer, stopwatch, and
    mindlessly regular route, I doubt that I'd notice much
    difference one way or another in terms of speed.

    Depending on your height, a longer seat post might be needed
    for almost any department-store bike.

    Carl Fogel
     
  20. PSB

    PSB Guest

    I'm six foot tall and about 160. I'll check closer into the Roadmaster
    when I go back to the department store and make my decision then.

    One more question, does the Roadmaster have holes where a bike rack can
    be attached easily? I know the Schwinn Sidewinder does.
     
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