Scones question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Amberle3, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. Amberle3

    Amberle3 Guest

    I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts. The show focused on tea parties
    and included how to make scones. They also mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.

    My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family recipe
    for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire Scones, I have
    no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're nothing like
    anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that was called a "scone". Most store or bakery
    scones are made with baking soda and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones
    are made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then brushed
    with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.

    My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it would be
    this hard, round tea biscuit.

    I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to think that scones are anything
    other than the hard, round tea biscuits.

    What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all familiar
    to anyone?

    Amberle3
    --
    Amberle3
    249/216/215-minigoal/150?
    Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03

    - Take Heart, Take Part Exercise Challenge:
    http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/thtp.htm
    - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
     
    Tags:


  2. Fred

    Fred Guest

    I can assure you that this Bronx guy does not know historical scones but the ones I have had match
    the ones your granddad's recipe shows. A pie wedge shape cut from a large circle. I've had some
    great oatmeal scones altho, I don't think they fit in the point friendly listings (G)

    So, care to share this old world, heritage recipe?

    On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 18:25:50 GMT, Amberle3 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts. The show focused on tea parties
    >and included how to make scones. They also mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    >
    >My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family recipe
    >for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire Scones, I have
    >no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're nothing like
    >anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that was called a "scone". Most store or bakery
    >scones are made with baking soda and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones
    >are made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then brushed
    >with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    >
    >My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it would be
    >this hard, round tea biscuit.
    >
    >I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to think that scones are anything
    >other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    >
    >What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all familiar
    >to anyone?
    >
    >Amberle3
     
  3. Connie

    Connie Guest

    Your scones sound better than any I've ever had!! More points too I imagine!! But who worries about
    points when their Grandfathers' recipe is called into question??

    Connie

    Fred wrote:
    > I can assure you that this Bronx guy does not know historical scones but the ones I have had match
    > the ones your granddad's recipe shows. A pie wedge shape cut from a large circle. I've had some
    > great oatmeal scones altho, I don't think they fit in the point friendly listings (G)
    >
    > So, care to share this old world, heritage recipe?
    >
    > On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 18:25:50 GMT, Amberle3 <am[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts. The show focused on tea parties
    >>and included how to make scones. They also mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    >>
    >>My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family recipe
    >>for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire Scones, I have
    >>no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're nothing like
    >>anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that was called a "scone". Most store or bakery
    >>scones are made with baking soda and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones
    >>are made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then brushed
    >>with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    >>
    >>My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it would
    >>be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    >>
    >>I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to think that scones are anything
    >>other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    >>
    >>What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all familiar
    >>to anyone?
    >>
    >>Amberle3
    >
    >

    --

    Cheers,

    Connie Walsh

    241.5/201.5/155 RAFL 210.5/201.5/198.5
     
  4. Lesanne

    Lesanne Guest

    Well I do scones by patting the dough into a large circle and cutting into wedges, but I really love
    the butter flavor, so I use butter. I use baking powder, and usually some sort of spice (coriander,
    nutmeg, orange zest, something like that) and some sort of dried fruit (raisins, cherries, berries)
    and sprinkle maple sugar on top.

    "Amberle3" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts. The show focused on tea parties
    > and included how to make scones. They also mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    >
    > My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family recipe
    > for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire Scones, I have
    > no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're nothing like
    > anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that was called a "scone". Most store or bakery
    > scones are made with baking soda and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones
    > are made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then brushed
    > with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    >
    > My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it would
    > be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    >
    > I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to think that scones are anything
    > other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    >
    > What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all familiar
    > to anyone?
    >
    > Amberle3
    > --
    > Amberle3
    > 249/216/215-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    >
    > - Take Heart, Take Part Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/thtp.htm
    > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
     
  5. Julie

    Julie Guest

    Hi Amberle, Growing up in Lancashire in the UK, scones had raisins or currants in them and were made
    of some kind of dough that was dropped onto a baking sheet rather than cut out then baked. They were
    usually served with butter and jam. I never had heard of a "tea biscuit" till I moved to Canada.
    Your scones sound more like Scottish shortbread to me - I'm salivating! Would you be so kind as to
    post the recipe? Julie

    "Amberle3" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts. The show focused on tea parties
    > and included how to make scones. They also mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    >
    > My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family recipe
    > for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire Scones, I have
    > no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're nothing like
    > anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that was called a "scone". Most store or bakery
    > scones are made with baking soda and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones
    > are made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then brushed
    > with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    >
    > My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it would
    > be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    >
    > I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to think that scones are anything
    > other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    >
    > What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all familiar
    > to anyone?
    >
    > Amberle3
    > --
    > Amberle3
    > 249/216/215-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    >
    > - Take Heart, Take Part Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/thtp.htm
    > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
     
  6. Kate Dicey

    Kate Dicey Guest

    Amberle3 wrote:

    > I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts. The show focused on tea parties
    > and included how to make scones. They also mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    >
    > My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family recipe
    > for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire Scones, I have
    > no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're nothing like
    > anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that was called a "scone". Most store or bakery
    > scones are made with baking soda and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones
    > are made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then brushed
    > with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    >
    > My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it would
    > be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    >
    > I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to think that scones are anything
    > other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    >
    > What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all familiar
    > to anyone?
    >
    > Amberle3
    > --
    > Amberle3
    > 249/216/215-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    >
    > - Take Heart, Take Part Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/thtp.htm
    > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm

    Your recipe sounds similar to my own Girdle Scones - a true scot's tradition!

    Half fill a small mixing bowl with self raising flour (or plain flour with baking powder added)

    Add a pinch of salt and a tablespoon of sugar

    Make a well in the middle and stirr in enough milk or cream to make a softish dough - use a knife:
    it's the best tool for the job! Turn out onto a well floured surface and pat into a circle about
    3/4" thick. Cut into 8 wedges and cook a few at a time on a well heated girdle (the flat sort).

    These are best made with cream that is just on the turn: not sour yet, but not fresh enough to pour
    over strawberries.

    This and other Scottish recipes are on my web site, along with a picture of the girdle at work
    cooking Scots pancakes.
    --

    Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
    http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
    Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
     
  7. Lesanne

    Lesanne Guest

    I have a scones recipe that makes big juicy 6 point ones. A major breakfast.

    "Connie" <[email protected]_primus.ca> wrote in message news:[email protected]_primus.ca...
    > Your scones sound better than any I've ever had!! More points too I imagine!! But who worries
    > about points when their Grandfathers' recipe is called into question??
    >
    > Connie
    >
    > Fred wrote:
    > > I can assure you that this Bronx guy does not know historical scones but the ones I have had
    > > match the ones your granddad's recipe shows. A pie wedge shape cut from a large circle. I've had
    > > some great oatmeal scones altho, I don't think they fit in the point friendly listings (G)
    > >
    > > So, care to share this old world, heritage recipe?
    > >
    > > On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 18:25:50 GMT, Amberle3 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts. The show focused on tea
    > >>parties and included how to make scones. They also mentioned that scones are also known as tea
    > >>biscuits.
    > >>
    > >>My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family
    > >>recipe for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire
    > >>Scones, I have no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're
    > >>nothing like anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that was called a "scone". Most
    > >>store or bakery scones are made with baking soda and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My
    > >>Yorkshire Scones are made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into
    > >>wedges, then brushed with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    > >>
    > >>My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it would
    > >>be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    > >>
    > >>I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to think that scones are
    > >>anything other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    > >>
    > >>What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all familiar
    > >>to anyone?
    > >>
    > >>Amberle3
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Connie Walsh
    >
    > 241.5/201.5/155 RAFL 210.5/201.5/198.5
     
  8. Geri

    Geri Guest

    The only "scones" I've ever had were from the Puyallup Fair here in WA state. People lined up by the
    hundreds to buy them. I always thought they tasted just like the drop biscuits my mom used to make.
    They were okay, but nothing to get excited about (or to stand in line for.)

    Geri
     
  9. Fred

    Fred Guest

    Six points does not sound that bad??? Accompanied by a glass of water and you have a full
    breakfast (G)

    On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 22:14:44 GMT, "Lesanne" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have a scones recipe that makes big juicy 6 point ones. A major breakfast.
    >
    >"Connie" <[email protected]_primus.ca> wrote in message news:[email protected]_primus.ca...
    >> Your scones sound better than any I've ever had!! More points too I imagine!! But who worries
    >> about points when their Grandfathers' recipe is called into question??
    >>
    >> Connie
    >>
    >> Fred wrote:
    >> > I can assure you that this Bronx guy does not know historical scones but the ones I have had
    >> > match the ones your granddad's recipe shows. A pie wedge shape cut from a large circle. I've
    >> > had some great oatmeal scones altho, I don't think they fit in the point friendly listings (G)
    >> >
    >> > So, care to share this old world, heritage recipe?
    >> >
    >> > On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 18:25:50 GMT, Amberle3 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >>I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts. The show focused on tea
    >> >>parties and included how to make scones. They also mentioned that scones are also known as tea
    >> >>biscuits.
    >> >>
    >> >>My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family
    >> >>recipe for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire
    >> >>Scones, I have no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're
    >> >>nothing like anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that was called a "scone". Most
    >> >>store or bakery scones are made with baking soda and butter, rolled out and cut into circles.
    >> >>My Yorkshire Scones are made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut
    >> >>into wedges, then brushed with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    >> >>
    >> >>My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it
    >> >>would be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    >> >>
    >> >>I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to think that scones are
    >> >>anything other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    >> >>
    >> >>What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all familiar
    >> >>to anyone?
    >> >>
    >> >>Amberle3
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >>
    >> Connie Walsh
    >>
    >> 241.5/201.5/155 RAFL 210.5/201.5/198.5
    >
     
  10. Lesanne

    Lesanne Guest

    Yes, but the thing IS actually a whole breakfast. It is the size of a sixth of a pie. And solid,
    filling, and very very evil tasting.

    "Fred" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Six points does not sound that bad??? Accompanied by a glass of water and you have a full
    > breakfast (G)
    >
    > On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 22:14:44 GMT, "Lesanne" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I have a scones recipe that makes big juicy 6 point ones. A major breakfast.
    > >
    > >"Connie" <[email protected]_primus.ca> wrote in message news:[email protected]_primus.ca...
    > >> Your scones sound better than any I've ever had!! More points too I imagine!! But who worries
    > >> about points when their Grandfathers' recipe is called into question??
    > >>
    > >> Connie
    > >>
    > >> Fred wrote:
    > >> > I can assure you that this Bronx guy does not know historical scones but the ones I have had
    > >> > match the ones your granddad's recipe shows. A pie wedge shape cut from a large circle. I've
    > >> > had some great oatmeal scones altho, I don't think they fit in the point friendly listings
    > >> > (G)
    > >> >
    > >> > So, care to share this old world, heritage recipe?
    > >> >
    > >> > On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 18:25:50 GMT, Amberle3 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >>I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts.
    The
    > >> >>show focused on tea parties and included how to make scones. They
    also
    > >> >>mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    > >> >>
    > >> >>My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family
    > >> >>recipe for scones that has been in existence
    for
    > >> >>at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire Scones, I have no idea if this makes them different
    > >> >>from regular UK scones or not. But they're nothing like anything I've ever had the misfortune
    > >> >>to eat here that
    was
    > >> >>called a "scone". Most store or bakery scones are made with baking
    soda
    > >> >>and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones
    are
    > >> >>made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then
    > >> >>brushed with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    > >> >>
    > >> >>My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it
    > >> >>would be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    > >> >>
    > >> >>I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to
    think
    > >> >>that scones are anything other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    > >> >>
    > >> >>What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all
    > >> >>familiar to anyone?
    > >> >>
    > >> >>Amberle3
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >>
    > >> Cheers,
    > >>
    > >> Connie Walsh
    > >>
    > >> 241.5/201.5/155 RAFL 210.5/201.5/198.5
    > >>
     
  11. Kate Dicey

    Kate Dicey Guest

    Fred wrote:

    > Six points does not sound that bad??? Accompanied by a glass of water and you have a full
    > breakfast (G)

    It's twice what I usually have! 2 Wheetabix or Shredded Wheet at a point each, with half a
    teaspoon of demerera sugar and a little milk, for 3 points total. Often followed by an apple, for
    half a point.
    --

    Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
    http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
    Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
     
  12. Lesanne

    Lesanne Guest

    I always have 6 to 8 points for breakfast. Fuels my exercise :):):)

    "Kate Dicey" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    online.co.uk...
    > Fred wrote:
    >
    > > Six points does not sound that bad??? Accompanied by a glass of water and you have a full
    > > breakfast (G)
    >
    > It's twice what I usually have! 2 Wheetabix or Shredded Wheet at a point each, with half a
    > teaspoon of demerera sugar and a little milk, for 3 points total. Often followed by an apple, for
    > half a point.
    > --

    > Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
    > Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
     
  13. Kate Dicey

    Kate Dicey Guest

    Lesanne wrote:

    > I always have 6 to 8 points for breakfast. Fuels my exercise :):):)
    >

    Because the fibro makes me stiff in the mornings, I rarely do anything physical before lunch. My
    walk is abour 3 pm.
    --

    Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
    http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
    Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
     
  14. Fred

    Fred Guest

    Cereal and milk here for about 5 to 6 points. Apple/pear mid=morning.

    I add stuff if a hike/etc is planned.

    On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 13:48:50 +0000, Kate Dicey <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Fred wrote:
    >
    >> Six points does not sound that bad??? Accompanied by a glass of water and you have a full
    >> breakfast (G)
    >
    >It's twice what I usually have! 2 Wheetabix or Shredded Wheet at a point each, with half a
    >teaspoon of demerera sugar and a little milk, for 3 points total. Often followed by an apple, for
    >half a point.
     
  15. Amberle3

    Amberle3 Guest

    These have raisins in them too, I just didn't bother to post all the ingredients. Another difference
    between the TV version and mine - the host said the knead the dough just a little, maybe up to 9
    times, and then cut & bake. Mine are kneaded, and kneaded, and kneaded. I swear it must take 10
    minutes. I only know when they're ready when the consistency is right.

    As for posting the recipe, I'm really torn about it. I get so much support from you guys and feel
    like I should be posting it, but it's a family recipe that has never been shared with anyone outside
    the family. Ack! And now that my aunt has decided that Bisquick make an acceptable alternative to
    the dough (it doesn't) my mother and I seem to be the last ones in the family to be making them the
    traditional way.

    Ack! Ack! Ack!

    Give me a few days to sort this out. I really don't want my "secret family recipe" posted on
    websites from here to eternity, but there's gotta be some way of doing this.

    BTW they come out to just over 5 points each.

    Amberle3

    Julie wrote:
    >
    > Hi Amberle, Growing up in Lancashire in the UK, scones had raisins or currants in them and were
    > made of some kind of dough that was dropped onto a baking sheet rather than cut out then baked.
    > They were usually served with butter and jam. I never had heard of a "tea biscuit" till I moved to
    > Canada. Your scones sound more like Scottish shortbread to me - I'm salivating! Would you be so
    > kind as to post the recipe? Julie
    >
    > "Amberle3" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts. The show focused on tea
    > > parties and included how to make scones. They also mentioned that scones are also known as tea
    > > biscuits.
    > >
    > > My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family
    > > recipe for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire
    > > Scones, I have no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're
    > > nothing like anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that was called a "scone". Most
    > > store or bakery scones are made with baking soda and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My
    > > Yorkshire Scones are made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into
    > > wedges, then brushed with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    > >
    > > My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it would
    > > be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    > >
    > > I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to think that scones are
    > > anything other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    > >
    > > What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all familiar
    > > to anyone?
    > >
    > > Amberle3
    > > --
    > > Amberle3
    > > 249/216/215-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    > >
    > > - Take Heart, Take Part Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/thtp.htm
    > > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm

    --
    Amberle3
    249/215/205-minigoal/150?
    Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03

    - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    - Spring Into Action Exercise Challenge:
    http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/sia.htm
     
  16. Lesanne

    Lesanne Guest

    oh come on, nobody is going to knead them for 10 minutes, you can post it
    :):):):)
    Says a veteran bread maker slyly, who wants the recipe......

    "Amberle3" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > These have raisins in them too, I just didn't bother to post all the ingredients. Another
    > difference between the TV version and mine - the host said the knead the dough just a little,
    > maybe up to 9 times, and then cut & bake. Mine are kneaded, and kneaded, and kneaded. I swear it
    > must take 10 minutes. I only know when they're ready when the consistency is right.
    >
    > As for posting the recipe, I'm really torn about it. I get so much support from you guys and feel
    > like I should be posting it, but it's a family recipe that has never been shared with anyone
    > outside the family. Ack! And now that my aunt has decided that Bisquick make an acceptable
    > alternative to the dough (it doesn't) my mother and I seem to be the last ones in the family to be
    > making them the traditional way.
    >
    > Ack! Ack! Ack!
    >
    > Give me a few days to sort this out. I really don't want my "secret family recipe" posted on
    > websites from here to eternity, but there's gotta be some way of doing this.
    >
    > BTW they come out to just over 5 points each.
    >
    > Amberle3
    >
    > Julie wrote:
    > >
    > > Hi Amberle, Growing up in Lancashire in the UK, scones had raisins or currants in
    them
    > > and were made of some kind of dough that was dropped onto a baking sheet rather than cut out
    > > then baked. They were usually served with butter and jam. I never had heard of a "tea biscuit"
    > > till I moved to Canada. Your scones sound more like Scottish shortbread to me - I'm salivating!
    Would
    > > you be so kind as to post the recipe? Julie
    > >
    > > "Amberle3" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts.
    The
    > > > show focused on tea parties and included how to make scones. They
    also
    > > > mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    > > >
    > > > My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family
    > > > recipe for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire
    > > > Scones, I have no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're
    > > > nothing like anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that
    was
    > > > called a "scone". Most store or bakery scones are made with baking
    soda
    > > > and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones are made with baking powder
    > > > and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then brushed with milk and sprinkled
    > > > with sugar before baking.
    > > >
    > > > My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it
    > > > would be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    > > >
    > > > I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to
    think
    > > > that scones are anything other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    > > >
    > > > What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all
    > > > familiar to anyone?
    > > >
    > > > Amberle3
    > > > --
    > > > Amberle3
    > > > 249/216/215-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    > > >
    > > > - Take Heart, Take Part Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/thtp.htm
    > > > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > > > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    >
    > --
    > Amberle3
    > 249/215/205-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    >
    > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    > - Spring Into Action Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/sia.htm
     
  17. Amberle3

    Amberle3 Guest

    Okay, this is what I'm going to do.

    I'm NOT going to post the recipe. But I will give it to people who email me asking for it on the
    condition that THEY in turn treat it like a cherished possesion and do NOT post it online (and I
    mean anywhere) or share it. There are too many websites that have recipes that have been collected
    from various sources, many times without the author's knowledge. I really don't want my family
    recipe ending up in one of those.

    People also have to understand that I have no idea how to appropriately articulate when the dough is
    ready. It just feels right.

    Okay, so that's the rules. Tough, I know. But it's my family recipe and I have to protect
    it somehow.

    Amberle3 (with visions of walking into a bakery only to discover that Wolfgang Puck has found her
    family recipe online and is making a mint off it it, or having it show up in a Betty Crocker bake-
    off recipe book and everyone and their dogs are now making it)

    Lesanne wrote:
    >
    > oh come on, nobody is going to knead them for 10 minutes, you can post it
    > :):):):)
    > Says a veteran bread maker slyly, who wants the recipe......
    >
    > "Amberle3" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > These have raisins in them too, I just didn't bother to post all the ingredients. Another
    > > difference between the TV version and mine - the host said the knead the dough just a little,
    > > maybe up to 9 times, and then cut & bake. Mine are kneaded, and kneaded, and kneaded. I swear it
    > > must take 10 minutes. I only know when they're ready when the consistency is right.
    > >
    > > As for posting the recipe, I'm really torn about it. I get so much support from you guys and
    > > feel like I should be posting it, but it's a family recipe that has never been shared with
    > > anyone outside the family. Ack! And now that my aunt has decided that Bisquick make an
    > > acceptable alternative to the dough (it doesn't) my mother and I seem to be the last ones in the
    > > family to be making them the traditional way.
    > >
    > > Ack! Ack! Ack!
    > >
    > > Give me a few days to sort this out. I really don't want my "secret family recipe" posted on
    > > websites from here to eternity, but there's gotta be some way of doing this.
    > >
    > > BTW they come out to just over 5 points each.
    > >
    > > Amberle3
    > >
    > > Julie wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Hi Amberle, Growing up in Lancashire in the UK, scones had raisins or currants in
    > them
    > > > and were made of some kind of dough that was dropped onto a baking sheet rather than cut out
    > > > then baked. They were usually served with butter and jam. I never had heard of a "tea biscuit"
    > > > till I moved to Canada. Your scones sound more like Scottish shortbread to me - I'm
    > > > salivating!
    > Would
    > > > you be so kind as to post the recipe? Julie
    > > >
    > > > "Amberle3" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > > I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts.
    > The
    > > > > show focused on tea parties and included how to make scones. They
    > also
    > > > > mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    > > > >
    > > > > My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family
    > > > > recipe for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire
    > > > > Scones, I have no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But
    > > > > they're nothing like anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that
    > was
    > > > > called a "scone". Most store or bakery scones are made with baking
    > soda
    > > > > and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones are made with baking powder
    > > > > and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then brushed with milk and
    > > > > sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    > > > >
    > > > > My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it
    > > > > would be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    > > > >
    > > > > I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to
    > think
    > > > > that scones are anything other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    > > > >
    > > > > What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all
    > > > > familiar to anyone?
    > > > >
    > > > > Amberle3
    > > > > --
    > > > > Amberle3
    > > > > 249/216/215-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    > > > >
    > > > > - Take Heart, Take Part Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/thtp.htm
    > > > > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > > > > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    > >
    > > --
    > > Amberle3
    > > 249/215/205-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    > >
    > > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    > > - Spring Into Action Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/sia.htm

    --
    Amberle3
    249/215/205-minigoal/150?
    Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03

    - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    - Spring Into Action Exercise Challenge:
    http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/sia.htm
     
  18. I have eaten the full extremes, have seen both called scones here in IL,
    Lee, who is no help at all unless you would like help eating them?
    Amberle3 <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts. The show focused on tea parties
    > and included how to make scones. They also mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    >
    > My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family recipe
    > for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire Scones, I have
    > no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're nothing like
    > anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that was called a "scone". Most store or bakery
    > scones are made with baking soda and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones
    > are made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then brushed
    > with milk and sprinkled with sugar before baking.
    >
    > My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it would
    > be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    >
    > I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to think that scones are anything
    > other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    >
    > What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all familiar
    > to anyone?
    >
    > Amberle3
    > --
    > Amberle3
    > 249/216/215-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    >
    > - Take Heart, Take Part Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/thtp.htm
    > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
     
  19. This is a very personal issue. We will respect your wishes, Family is very
    important but, maybe if you send it to a few of us that actually do cherish
    good food we can carry on for you?? whatever you decide, we respect that
    Amberle3 <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > These have raisins in them too, I just didn't bother to post all the ingredients. Another
    > difference between the TV version and mine - the host said the knead the dough just a little,
    > maybe up to 9 times, and then cut & bake. Mine are kneaded, and kneaded, and kneaded. I swear it
    > must take 10 minutes. I only know when they're ready when the consistency is right.
    >
    > As for posting the recipe, I'm really torn about it. I get so much support from you guys and feel
    > like I should be posting it, but it's a family recipe that has never been shared with anyone
    > outside the family. Ack! And now that my aunt has decided that Bisquick make an acceptable
    > alternative to the dough (it doesn't) my mother and I seem to be the last ones in the family to be
    > making them the traditional way.
    >
    > Ack! Ack! Ack!
    >
    > Give me a few days to sort this out. I really don't want my "secret family recipe" posted on
    > websites from here to eternity, but there's gotta be some way of doing this.
    >
    > BTW they come out to just over 5 points each.
    >
    > Amberle3
    >
    > Julie wrote:
    > >
    > > Hi Amberle, Growing up in Lancashire in the UK, scones had raisins or currants in
    them
    > > and were made of some kind of dough that was dropped onto a baking sheet rather than cut out
    > > then baked. They were usually served with butter and jam. I never had heard of a "tea biscuit"
    > > till I moved to Canada. Your scones sound more like Scottish shortbread to me - I'm salivating!
    Would
    > > you be so kind as to post the recipe? Julie
    > >
    > > "Amberle3" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts.
    The
    > > > show focused on tea parties and included how to make scones. They
    also
    > > > mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    > > >
    > > > My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part in handing down a family
    > > > recipe for scones that has been in existence for at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire
    > > > Scones, I have no idea if this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But they're
    > > > nothing like anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here that
    was
    > > > called a "scone". Most store or bakery scones are made with baking
    soda
    > > > and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones are made with baking powder
    > > > and shortening, patted into a circle and cut into wedges, then brushed with milk and sprinkled
    > > > with sugar before baking.
    > > >
    > > > My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would offer them a "scone" and it
    > > > would be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    > > >
    > > > I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to
    think
    > > > that scones are anything other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    > > >
    > > > What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my family recipe sound at all
    > > > familiar to anyone?
    > > >
    > > > Amberle3
    > > > --
    > > > Amberle3
    > > > 249/216/215-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    > > >
    > > > - Take Heart, Take Part Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/thtp.htm
    > > > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > > > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    >
    > --
    > Amberle3
    > 249/215/205-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    >
    > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    > - Spring Into Action Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/sia.htm
     
  20. I would love to have it, have you considered copywriting it so if something
    does happen that you do not like you can take action? Lee
    Amberle3 <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Okay, this is what I'm going to do.
    >
    > I'm NOT going to post the recipe. But I will give it to people who email me asking for it on the
    > condition that THEY in turn treat it like a cherished possesion and do NOT post it online (and I
    > mean anywhere) or share it. There are too many websites that have recipes that have been collected
    > from various sources, many times without the author's knowledge. I really don't want my family
    > recipe ending up in one of those.
    >
    > People also have to understand that I have no idea how to appropriately articulate when the dough
    > is ready. It just feels right.
    >
    > Okay, so that's the rules. Tough, I know. But it's my family recipe and I have to protect it
    > somehow.
    >
    > Amberle3 (with visions of walking into a bakery only to discover that Wolfgang Puck has found her
    > family recipe online and is making a mint off it it, or having it show up in a Betty Crocker bake-
    > off recipe book and everyone and their dogs are now making it)
    >
    >
    > Lesanne wrote:
    > >
    > > oh come on, nobody is going to knead them for 10 minutes, you can post
    it
    > > :):):):)
    > > Says a veteran bread maker slyly, who wants the recipe......
    > >
    > > "Amberle3" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > These have raisins in them too, I just didn't bother to post all the ingredients. Another
    > > > difference between the TV version and mine - the host said the knead the dough just a little,
    > > > maybe up to 9 times, and then cut & bake. Mine are kneaded, and kneaded, and kneaded. I swear
    > > > it must take 10 minutes. I only know when they're ready when the consistency is right.
    > > >
    > > > As for posting the recipe, I'm really torn about it. I get so much support from you guys and
    > > > feel like I should be posting it, but it's a family recipe that has never been shared with
    > > > anyone outside the family. Ack! And now that my aunt has decided that Bisquick make an
    > > > acceptable alternative to the dough (it doesn't) my mother and I seem
    to
    > > > be the last ones in the family to be making them the traditional way.
    > > >
    > > > Ack! Ack! Ack!
    > > >
    > > > Give me a few days to sort this out. I really don't want my "secret family recipe" posted on
    > > > websites from here to eternity, but there's gotta be some way of doing this.
    > > >
    > > > BTW they come out to just over 5 points each.
    > > >
    > > > Amberle3
    > > >
    > > > Julie wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > Hi Amberle, Growing up in Lancashire in the UK, scones had raisins or currants
    in
    > > them
    > > > > and were made of some kind of dough that was dropped onto a baking
    sheet
    > > > > rather than cut out then baked. They were usually served with butter
    and
    > > > > jam. I never had heard of a "tea biscuit" till I moved to Canada.
    Your
    > > > > scones sound more like Scottish shortbread to me - I'm salivating!
    > > Would
    > > > > you be so kind as to post the recipe? Julie
    > > > >
    > > > > "Amberle3" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > > > I was watching a show on FoodTV Canada today and it drove me nuts.
    > > The
    > > > > > show focused on tea parties and included how to make scones. They
    > > also
    > > > > > mentioned that scones are also known as tea biscuits.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > My grandparents were from the UK, and my grandfather did his part
    in
    > > > > > handing down a family recipe for scones that has been in existence
    for
    > > > > > at least 8 generations. They're Yorkshire Scones, I have no idea
    if
    > > > > > this makes them different from regular UK scones or not. But
    they're
    > > > > > nothing like anything I've ever had the misfortune to eat here
    that
    > > was
    > > > > > called a "scone". Most store or bakery scones are made with
    baking
    > > soda
    > > > > > and butter, rolled out and cut into circles. My Yorkshire Scones
    are
    > > > > > made with baking powder and shortening, patted into a circle and
    cut
    > > > > > into wedges, then brushed with milk and sprinkled with sugar
    before
    > > > > > baking.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > My grandparents were always very aggravated when someone would
    offer
    > > > > > them a "scone" and it would be this hard, round tea biscuit.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > I'm now all confused, because no one other than my family seems to
    > > think
    > > > > > that scones are anything other than the hard, round tea biscuits.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > What does everyone else out there know as "scones"? Does my
    family
    > > > > > recipe sound at all familiar to anyone?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Amberle3
    > > > > > --
    > > > > > Amberle3
    > > > > > 249/216/215-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    > > > > >
    > > > > > - Take Heart, Take Part Exercise Challenge:
    > > > > > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/thtp.htm
    > > > > > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > > > > > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Amberle3
    > > > 249/215/205-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    > > >
    > > > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > > > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    > > > - Spring Into Action Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/sia.htm
    >
    > --
    > Amberle3
    > 249/215/205-minigoal/150? Renewed my commitment to me 3/30/03
    >
    > - Resolutions are for Losers Weight Loss Challenge:
    > http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/rafl.htm
    > - Spring Into Action Exercise Challenge: http://www.angelfire.com/me4/travelgirl/sia.htm
     
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