Scott CR1 Pro v. Orbea Onix?



teton explorer

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Jul 25, 2005
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If you have had experience with either of these bikes, please let me know which one you'd recommend. Thanks.
 

friedmikey

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Jan 20, 2005
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Never tried a Scott, but I have tried an Orbea Onix briefly. I did not like the Onix. I don't quite know how to describe it, but it felt "cheap" to me. Very stiff... too stiff. Great for power delivery, but not so good for comfort. A lot like the Ridleys. I wouldn't want to be on one for 100 miles, that's for sure!
 

dmhaero

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Jun 9, 2005
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I built up a Scott CR 1 Team Issue Dream bike 2 months ago. It is without a doubt the finest road bike I have ever ridden. I am not worthy of a bike this good! You must test ride a Scott CR 1. Dale
teton explorer said:
If you have had experience with either of these bikes, please let me know which one you'd recommend. Thanks.
 

snyper0311

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Mar 18, 2004
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I now have two Orbeas. THe first is a custom built Lobular frameset and the second is the Onix. It is stiff, but it's one of the fastest bikes I've ever ridden. If you are looking for a great bike, the Onix is one GREAT bike. It is very fast! :eek:
 

Rudy

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Sep 23, 2003
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Go to www.scottusa.com and look up the CR1. On their main page you can read some other independent reviews.

Also, read the independent carbon bikes review here from this thread..
http://weightweenies.starbike.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=1972&highlight=cr1

I have a CR1 and think that it's one of the best bike out there. Very smooth and comfy are its best features IMHO. It's not hard to get a stiff bike. But a stiff yet smooth/comfy is hard to find.

If you ask a bike owner's opinion of his bike, you'll often hear all the superlatives... ;)
 

3_days

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Jul 13, 2005
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I ride a Cervelo Soloist and have been looking for another bike that rides like it - since Cervelo has taken themselves out of my local market - I gave serious consideration to Orbea and Scott- two companies found at my LBS.

Just FYI: If a bike doesn't feel "fast" to me, I'll pass on it. The Soloist has that speedy feel I'm after ... so I'm a little impartial in my review.

I didn't feel it with the Orbea - that's not to say it's not a good bike, both these bikes are great bikes- but I felt more upright and less inclined to sprint with it - I would suggest that it feels stiffer than many of the carbon frames I've ridden - it's nice, but not for me. But everyone's different, I admit. Bottom line: I just didn't feel it - even though I really wanted to ...

The Scott rides more aggressively and is more in line with what I'm after - my best description is that the Scott rides a tighter line than the Orbea. It also felt a tad more comfortable to me - both in terms of road vibration and setup.

As of right now, I'm holding out to ride a few more frames - but for my preferences, between these two frames, I'd pick the CR1.
 

OTG42

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Jul 24, 2005
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I have a Scott CR1 with Centaur components. It's a really nice ride, smooth, comfortable, and yes, stiff. It's dimensions are almost idententical to Trek, but the Scott has a little bit longer head tube, so you're in a little more relaxed riding position, good for the long rides. You can always take stacks out of the stem if you want to be in a more aggressive riding position. Road buzz, dead hollow carbon sounds coming from the frame are not a problem on the Scott bike, it's a very impressive ride. I have about 1200 miles on it and have enjoyed every mile. Hope this helps with your decision, I was also looking at both the Orbea and Scott and went with the Scott bike. My decision was based on a better price and a better bike shop. Here, this ride report might help your descion Scott CR1
 

cwdzoot

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Sep 30, 2003
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OTG42 said:
I have a Scott CR1 with Centaur components. It's a really nice ride, smooth, comfortable, and yes, stiff. It's dimensions are almost idententical to Trek, but the Scott has a little bit longer head tube, so you're in a little more relaxed riding position, good for the long rides. You can always take stacks out of the stem if you want to be in a more aggressive riding position. Road buzz, dead hollow carbon sounds coming from the frame are not a problem on the Scott bike, it's a very impressive ride. I have about 1200 miles on it and have enjoyed every mile. Hope this helps with your decision, I was also looking at both the Orbea and Scott and went with the Scott bike. My decision was based on a better price and a better bike shop. Here, this ride report might help your descion Scott CR1


Perhaps take it to the next level - not only compare bikes but try match the bike to you.

One of the biggest issues with the new carbon frames is the sizing - orbea size every 3 cm - Scott I am not sure. I would say you need to take a very good look at the geometry of each and work out what frame size you will use and how much seatpost extension this frame will give you and what the stem length will be and how many spacers you will be using. These factors are all going to change the ride.

The Orbea is going to be stiffer and better suited to a heavier or taller rider.
 

ChangMan

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May 13, 2005
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My buddy has a CR1 that I have ridden a couple of times. The first thing I noticed was that it is stupid light. It handles very well for being so light. When I bought my Pinarello Dogma, the Scott CR1 was a very close second.
 

vascdoc

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May 7, 2005
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The Scott rides more aggressively and is more in line with what I'm after - my best description is that the Scott rides a tighter line than the Orbea. It also felt a tad more comfortable to me - both in terms of road vibration and setup.

As of right now, I'm holding out to ride a few more frames - but for my preferences, between these two frames, I'd pick the CR1.[/QUOTE]

You may want to give the Cannondale Six Thirteen a try. I have tried straight carbon bikes from Scott, Orbea, Trek, Cafee, etc, but the Six Thirteen has the best of the carbon and metal world combined. Weight wise I am under 16 lbs with pedals. I have over 1400 miles and my upper body is the most relaxed and comfortable I have ever experienced.
 

luv2ride

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Jul 31, 2005
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The best way for someone to find a bike is just to test ride it. Find an orbea dealer and a scott dealer and simply ride the bike and see which one you like more, and also if you feel if it fits your needs. I, personally don't like giants as much as my CSK. Good luck! (by the way, I think the Onix is a better bike) ;)
 

vascdoc

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May 7, 2005
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The Six Thirteen is not a Giant. It is a Cannondale.


luv2ride said:
The best way for someone to find a bike is just to test ride it. Find an orbea dealer and a scott dealer and simply ride the bike and see which one you like more, and also if you feel if it fits your needs. I, personally don't like giants as much as my CSK. Good luck! (by the way, I think the Onix is a better bike) ;)
 

teton explorer

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Jul 25, 2005
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OTG42 said:
I have a Scott CR1 with Centaur components. It's a really nice ride, smooth, comfortable, and yes, stiff. It's dimensions are almost idententical to Trek, but the Scott has a little bit longer head tube, so you're in a little more relaxed riding position, good for the long rides. You can always take stacks out of the stem if you want to be in a more aggressive riding position. Road buzz, dead hollow carbon sounds coming from the frame are not a problem on the Scott bike, it's a very impressive ride. I have about 1200 miles on it and have enjoyed every mile. Hope this helps with your decision, I was also looking at both the Orbea and Scott and went with the Scott bike. My decision was based on a better price and a better bike shop. Here, this ride report might help your descion Scott CR1
Thank you. One other question. I'm kinda "between" the 56 (L) and the 58 (XL). I could ride either and be fine and comfortable. I'm leaning toward the 56 and adding a slightly longer stem. What do you think?
 

OTG42

New Member
Jul 24, 2005
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That's exactly what I did. Standing over the two bikes, the 58cm was too tall but had good reach and the 56cm was perfect, only not quite long enough. I got a 120mm Ritchey WCS stem from BikeSmart (they had the best price), and I couldn't be happier. Changing stem lengths is common practice in fitting a road bike. I'm a little over 6'0 tall but have these neanderthal arms with a finger tip to finger tip reach of a little over 6'3", I'd have to change the stem length on pretty much any brand bike I'd buy.

One suggestion I will make is don't make the same mistake I did and try and fit the bike by moving the seat back to gain reach. I did this for the first 400 miles and developed some really sore knees. Invest in a longer stem, you'll be much happier.
 

3_days

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Jul 13, 2005
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vascdoc said:
The Scott rides more aggressively and is more in line with what I'm after - my best description is that the Scott rides a tighter line than the Orbea. It also felt a tad more comfortable to me - both in terms of road vibration and setup.

As of right now, I'm holding out to ride a few more frames - but for my preferences, between these two frames, I'd pick the CR1.
*_* said:
You may want to give the Cannondale Six Thirteen a try. I have tried straight carbon bikes from Scott, Orbea, Trek, Cafee, etc, but the Six Thirteen has the best of the carbon and metal world combined. Weight wise I am under 16 lbs with pedals. I have over 1400 miles and my upper body is the most relaxed and comfortable I have ever experienced.
I tried the six13 a few times actually - I have last year's R600; Cannondale's ride comfortably but not as aggressively as my Cervelo. On the Cervelo, I feel like I'm lower and getting through the wind more easily- the Cannondale has me a bit more upright. I've tried to match the set-up and I still feel too "upright" on the C-dale - like the wind hits me in the chest. I just don't assume the same posture on a Cannondale - but I'm sure it's all in my head.
 

teton explorer

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Jul 25, 2005
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OTG42 said:
That's exactly what I did. Standing over the two bikes, the 58cm was too tall but had good reach and the 56cm was perfect, only not quite long enough. I got a 120mm Ritchey WCS stem from BikeSmart (they had the best price), and I couldn't be happier. Changing stem lengths is common practice in fitting a road bike. I'm a little over 6'0 tall but have these neanderthal arms with a finger tip to finger tip reach of a little over 6'3", I'd have to change the stem length on pretty much any brand bike I'd buy.

One suggestion I will make is don't make the same mistake I did and try and fit the bike by moving the seat back to gain reach. I did this for the first 400 miles and developed some really sore knees. Invest in a longer stem, you'll be much happier.
Great advice. Thanks for your help.
 

vascdoc

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May 7, 2005
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3_days said:
I tried the six13 a few times actually - I have last year's R600; Cannondale's ride comfortably but not as aggressively as my Cervelo. On the Cervelo, I feel like I'm lower and getting through the wind more easily- the Cannondale has me a bit more upright. I've tried to match the set-up and I still feel too "upright" on the C-dale - like the wind hits me in the chest. I just don't assume the same posture on a Cannondale - but I'm sure it's all in my head.
I went with a smaller frame and used a 110 stem to increase my reach on the front bar. My position is quite low with a greater than 4 inch height of my seat above the stem position. The 6-13 has a classic frame design and thus the top tube is not angled upwards like on other modern frame designs. I am not sure why the wind was more of a problem unless the frame was not properly fitted to you. The 6-13 is the same frame used by the Lampre team.

Check out this link: http://www.bicycletest.com/absolutenm/templates/bt.asp?articleid=146&zoneid=10
 

vascdoc

New Member
May 7, 2005
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One other thing - with pedals etc, my bike (6-13) weights 15.7 lbs. Very amazing bike!
 

rltaylor

New Member
Jul 23, 2005
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teton explorer said:
If you have had experience with either of these bikes, please let me know which one you'd recommend. Thanks.
I own an Orbea Onix and it seems to be a great bike.

My advice would be to ignore all of the hype and bs about how a bike supposedly feels "more aggressive", "seems more lively", "feels quicker", is "stiffer", is "more comfortable" etc.

This reminds me of an audio salesman showing me $400.00 speaker wires that perform identically to $20.00 worth of heavy gauge zip cord and claiming that the speaker wires had incredible "sound stage".

Almost all of these high-end frames are very stiff. The road feel comes almost entirely from the tires, saddle, stem and bar, and the fork. The frame seat stays, seat tube, etc. are very stiff and incompressible.

The most important aspect of comfort is your fit or position on the bike. This can be adjusted by changing the seat position, seat post, stem, etc. if the frame is close to being the correct size.

Paying a lot does get you a lighter bike. If your body fat is 8% of your body weight and you are a competitive racer in hilly terrain by all means spends thousands to save a few ounces here and there. It might help you place higher in the next race.

If you are more like me (an older, fatter, recreational rider), realize a wonderful bike can be setup around either of these frames and of course many others.

BobT
 

teton explorer

New Member
Jul 25, 2005
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rltaylor said:
I own an Orbea Onix and it seems to be a great bike.

My advice would be to ignore all of the hype and bs about how a bike supposedly feels "more aggressive", "seems more lively", "feels quicker", is "stiffer", is "more comfortable" etc.

This reminds me of an audio salesman showing me $400.00 speaker wires that perform identically to $20.00 worth of heavy gauge zip cord and claiming that the speaker wires had incredible "sound stage".

Almost all of these high-end frames are very stiff. The road feel comes almost entirely from the tires, saddle, stem and bar, and the fork. The frame seat stays, seat tube, etc. are very stiff and incompressible.

The most important aspect of comfort is your fit or position on the bike. This can be adjusted by changing the seat position, seat post, stem, etc. if the frame is close to being the correct size.

Paying a lot does get you a lighter bike. If your body fat is 8% of your body weight and you are a competitive racer in hilly terrain by all means spends thousands to save a few ounces here and there. It might help you place higher in the next race.

If you are more like me (an older, fatter, recreational rider), realize a wonderful bike can be setup around either of these frames and of course many others.

BobT
I got the Scott. Its an amazing bike. I'm sure the Orbea is a great bike, too. But every ride on the Scott confirms that I made the right decision for me.