Scrambled eggs

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by biig, Jan 2, 2006.

  1. biig

    biig Guest

    There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon

    http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm
     
    Tags:


  2. Karen

    Karen Guest

    "biig" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >
    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    >
    > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm


    Unfortunately your link didn't work, so I checked out the Great British
    Kitchen site. There's a lot of good information there! I was able to track
    down the recipe for "rumbled eggs" cooked over boiling water - here's the
    link: http://tinyurl.com/95j6s

    I don't care for dry eggs either - I'll have to give this method a try.
    Thanks, Sharon!

    Karen
     
  3. biig

    biig Guest

    Karen wrote:
    >
    > "biig" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    > >
    > > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm

    >
    > Unfortunately your link didn't work, so I checked out the Great British
    > Kitchen site. There's a lot of good information there! I was able to track
    > down the recipe for "rumbled eggs" cooked over boiling water - here's the
    > link: http://tinyurl.com/95j6s
    >
    > I don't care for dry eggs either - I'll have to give this method a try.
    > Thanks, Sharon!
    >
    > Karen

    Sorry the link didn't work, but glad you found the recipe....Sharon
     
  4. Boron Elgar

    Boron Elgar Guest

    On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 10:03:10 -0500, biig <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    >how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    >melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    >like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    >nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    >
    > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm



    That link is broken. Try this.
    http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipes_result.asp?name=rumbledeggs


    I have seen recipes before that call for making scrambled eggs in a
    double boiler.

    Boron
     
  5. AC

    AC Guest

    biig wrote:


    >I don't like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even

    in a
    > nonstick pan.


    if your eggs are dry and brown when you get done cooking them then you're
    likely using too much heat. if the eggs are sticking to the nonstick pan,
    you may not have enough fat in the pan. cook them gently and use some butter
    in the pan and you'll have light fluffy eggs and clean up will be much
    easier too.
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, biig <[email protected]> wrote:

    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    >
    > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm


    Do them in a bowl in the microwave. 50% power, stirring frequently
    until they are a little more moist than yuo like them. Remove, cover
    and let stand to continue cooking for a couple minutes.
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-1-2006, Sam I Am! and Hello!
     
  7. aem

    aem Guest

    biig wrote:
    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon


    All this does is lower the heat. You can (and should) do the same with
    your pan, assuming you're after soft, large curd scrambled eggs rather
    than an omelet. If you are getting dry, brown eggs and a pan that
    needs more than a quick wipe, you have to be using way too much heat
    for too long. And remember to remove the eggs before you think they're
    fully done to your liking, as they will finish cooking on the way to
    your table. -aem
     
  8. biig <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    >
    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that
    > explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something
    > like melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I
    > don't like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the
    > clean-up...even in a nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe
    > soon....Sharon
    >
    > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm



    Problem with most cooks is they cook eggs on TOO hot of a temperature. I
    used to cook at a restaurant and the manager always had me do the Sunday
    egg grill, he always noted that I made the best eggs. He asked me my
    secret. I told him that I turned the grill down, so the eggs would cook
    a little slower and would not overshoot so much when you took them off
    the grill. Eggs are quite delicate and if you cook them till down and
    then take them out of the pan they will continue to cook just like
    letting meat rest allows the meat to continue cooking off heat.

    Using the double boiler method above forces you to use a lower heat. May
    I suggest that all you need to do is use a lower temperature setting. I
    prefer to cook my eggs in an electric skillet as I can easily set the
    temperature to controlled low temp.

    I really hate when I go to a restaurant and the eggs have those burnt
    brown edges. Either the cook is too busy or he has the grill too hot.

    --
    ---
    Charles Quinn

    "Choosing the lesser of two evils, is still choosing evil" - Jerry
    Garcia
     
  9. hw

    hw Guest

    "biig" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >
    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    >
    > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm


    The L A Times had an article in the food section several months ago on how
    to properly scramble eggs. The method described was to use a very low
    flame and put the eggs into the pan as soon as the butter had melted and to
    continue to mix the eggs until just barely done, turn off the heat and let
    them sit for a few seconds to finish cooking. I tried this method and it
    does make very superior scrambled eggs.

    Harriet & critters (in rainy, SoCal)
     
  10. biig

    biig Guest

    AC wrote:
    >
    > biig wrote:
    >
    > >I don't like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even

    > in a
    > > nonstick pan.

    >
    > if your eggs are dry and brown when you get done cooking them then you're
    > likely using too much heat. if the eggs are sticking to the nonstick pan,
    > you may not have enough fat in the pan. cook them gently and use some butter
    > in the pan and you'll have light fluffy eggs and clean up will be much
    > easier too.


    I don't have a problem making scrambled eggs the way I like them...I
    was mostly referring to some I've had at restaurants. But even using a
    non stick pan, the egg sticks a bit. I use low heat too. But this
    other recipe sounded like a good one....Sharon
     
  11. Jimbo

    Jimbo Guest

    biig wrote:
    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    >
    > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm


    That's interesting. The Brits have come a ways. :) I recall when I
    was stationed there MANY years ago having to go in a restaurant kitchen
    and scramble my own eggs for breakfast since when I asked for them no
    one knew how. The rest of their breakfasts though was fantastic!
     
  12. biig

    biig Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, biig <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    > >
    > > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm

    >
    > Do them in a bowl in the microwave. 50% power, stirring frequently
    > until they are a little more moist than yuo like them. Remove, cover
    > and let stand to continue cooking for a couple minutes.
    > --
    > http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-1-2006, Sam I Am! and Hello!


    Now, I never would have thought of doing that....lol...I'll try that.
    It sounds easier than the double boiler method....
     
  13. On Mon, 2 Jan 2006, AC wrote:

    >
    > biig wrote:
    >
    >
    > >I don't like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even

    > in a
    > > nonstick pan.

    >
    > if your eggs are dry and brown when you get done cooking them then you're
    > likely using too much heat. if the eggs are sticking to the nonstick pan,
    > you may not have enough fat in the pan. cook them gently and use some butter
    > in the pan and you'll have light fluffy eggs and clean up will be much
    > easier too.
    >


    I totally agree. What are you guys doing to those eggs??? Just like
    anything else, there is a "done", a "well done" and a cremated.

    Cooking too fast is the main reason for "dry" and cremated is the reason
    for brown.

    If you let your pan get too hot before you put in the eggs, they will sear
    and brown.

    Using a non-stick pan does not eliminate the need for fat in the pan. I
    use butter. I also use cooking spray, sometimes. Warm the pan, allowing
    the butter to melt and drop in the eggs. The more you "mash" them up, the
    dryer they will be because you are breaking the egg in to tiny bits and
    each "bit" is drying out faster. Don't overwork them in the pan.

    After scrambling, I clean up my non-stick pan with a paper towel.

    Elaine, too
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>, biig <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > >
    > > Do them in a bowl in the microwave. 50% power, stirring frequently
    > > until they are a little more moist than yuo like them. Remove, cover
    > > and let stand to continue cooking for a couple minutes.
    > > --
    > > http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-1-2006, Sam I Am! and Hello!

    >
    > Now, I never would have thought of doing that....lol...I'll try that.
    > It sounds easier than the double boiler method....


    They'll puff up and then deflate. Let me know if it works well for you.
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-1-2006, Sam I Am! and Hello!
     
  15. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Jimbo wrote:
    >
    > biig wrote:
    > > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    > >
    > > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm

    >
    > That's interesting. The Brits have come a ways. :) I recall when I
    > was stationed there MANY years ago having to go in a restaurant kitchen
    > and scramble my own eggs for breakfast since when I asked for them no
    > one knew how. The rest of their breakfasts though was fantastic!


    Strange indeed. Perhaps if you'd asked for 'buttered eggs', you would
    have got what you wanted. Unless you were stationed there a couple
    hundred years ago, scrambled/buttered eggs were known by most people.
     
  16. Bronwyn

    Bronwyn Guest

    Yes, I think this is the best way to cook them. Works every time.

    Bron
     
  17. Bronwyn

    Bronwyn Guest

    Oh no they haven't! We were in England and Scotland in Sept and I had
    the worst scrambled eggs and this was at ritzy B&Bs. I don't think
    they added milk or cream, and the dry curds were almost crumbled on the
    dish. The next place I ordered them in WalesI asked how she intended
    making them LOL. She did such a good job, cream and smoked salmon, I
    could feel my arteries clogging!

    Cheers
    Bronnie
     
  18. Dave Bugg

    Dave Bugg Guest

    Bronwyn wrote:

    > Oh no they haven't!


    What are you replying to? Please include a bit of the previous text.
    Google groups does not act like a real newreader, so you'll have to make a
    bit of effort.
    --
    Dave
    www.davebbq.com
     
  19. stitcher

    stitcher Guest

    biig wrote:
    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    >


    I went to a New Year's Day brunch yesterday and the hostess made
    scrambled
    eggs for 28 people this way -- had a large roasting pan filled with the
    hot water,
    placed another large pan into the water and stirred every few minutes
    until the
    eggs were done. Delicious and easy way to make eggs for a crowd.
     
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