Scrambled eggs

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by biig, Jan 2, 2006.

  1. biig wrote:

    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    >
    > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm


    The web site isn't trying to take CREDIT for that method, are they? It's
    what Escoffier wrote more than a century ago!

    Bob
     


  2. MoM

    MoM Guest

    "biig" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website
    > that explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water,
    > something like
    > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist
    > eggs. I don't
    > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the
    > clean-up...even in a
    > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    >
    > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm



    Called Rumbled Eggs.

    http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipes_result.asp?name=rumbledeggs



    MoM
     
  3. On Mon 02 Jan 2006 07:13:58p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Melba's
    Jammin'?

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Bronwyn" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Yes, I think this is the best way to cook them. Works every time.
    >>
    >> Bron

    >
    > What is?


    Apparently, scrambled eggs cook in the MW. That's what she was responding
    to.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    __________________________________________________________________
    And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
     
  4. -L.

    -L. Guest

    biig wrote:
    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    >
    > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm


    I cook my scrambleds in a non-stick and they come out moist, fluffy and
    not browned. You simply must cook them on low, covered, and keep an
    eye on them.
    -L.
     
  5. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, biig <[email protected]> wrote:

    > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    >
    > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm


    I don't like my eggs dry and brown either, but I don't have a problem.
    I turn the heat under the frypan on low and melt the butter. Once it is
    melted I add the scrambled eggs. I stir constantly with a spatula,
    letting the liquid come in contact with the bottom of the pan. When it
    is set, I scoop out the eggs onto the serving plate, or directly onto
    the eating plates. With a non-stick pan, it all comes out, and there is
    nothing to clean except the film of butter.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  6. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    at Mon, 02 Jan 2006 18:52:32 GMT in <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (biig) wrote :

    >
    >
    >AC wrote:
    >>
    >> biig wrote:
    >>
    >> >I don't like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the
    >> >clean-up...even

    >> in a
    >> > nonstick pan.

    >>
    >> if your eggs are dry and brown when you get done cooking them then
    >> you're likely using too much heat...

    >
    > I don't have a problem making scrambled eggs the way I like them...I
    >was mostly referring to some I've had at restaurants.


    IME the issues with restaurant scrambled eggs have to do with them commonly
    cooking them over a griddle. This isn't IMHO a good idea. The griddle is
    too hot and furthermore has open sides. In addition they're "stirring" with
    a metal spatula, not with a spoon. The overall result is what I call
    "chopped omelette".

    My way to do scrambled eggs is in a pot with high sides (which traps
    moisture) over medium-low heat and stirring with a spoon. You want to stir
    relatively frequently although not like a madman. So slower pace than for
    instance for custard.

    I've also found that a regular (not non-stick) pot also works slightly
    better because butter or other fat tends to pool in a non-stick pot and
    inhibit good even cooking across the bottom. Furthermore it's difficult to
    get a good scraping action with a spoon without risking the finish on the
    pot no matter what, so non-stick is usually out for this application.
    Nonstick is better for omelettes - which again to some degree means that
    even in the home a lot of people are basically recreating chopped omelette
    when they try to make scrambled eggs.

    --
    Alex Rast
    [email protected]
    (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
  7. -L wrote:

    > I cook my scrambleds in a non-stick and they come out moist, fluffy and
    > not browned. You simply must cook them on low, covered, and keep an
    > eye on them.


    I cook my scrambled eggs in a nonstick and they come out moist, fluffy, and
    not browned. You simply must cook them on high heat, uncovered, with
    frequent passes of a wide spatula, and take them off the heat about ten
    seconds before you think you should.

    Cook's Illustrated agrees with me.

    Bob
     
  8. biig

    biig Guest

    stitcher wrote:
    >
    > biig wrote:
    > > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    > >

    >
    > I went to a New Year's Day brunch yesterday and the hostess made
    > scrambled
    > eggs for 28 people this way -- had a large roasting pan filled with the
    > hot water,
    > placed another large pan into the water and stirred every few minutes
    > until the
    > eggs were done. Delicious and easy way to make eggs for a crowd.


    That's a great idea. ....Sharon
     
  9. biig

    biig Guest

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >
    > biig wrote:
    >
    > > There's a recipe on "The Great British Kitchen" website that explains
    > > how to cook scrambled eggs in a bowl over boiling water, something like
    > > melting chocolate. Makes sense since you get nice moist eggs. I don't
    > > like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even in a
    > > nonstick pan. I'll try this recipe soon....Sharon
    > >
    > > http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipe_recipe.htm

    >
    > The web site isn't trying to take CREDIT for that method, are they? It's
    > what Escoffier wrote more than a century ago!
    >
    > Bob



    I don't know Bob....There is quite a collection of recipes
    there. ..worth a look IMHO....Sharon
     
  10. biig

    biig Guest

    Alex Rast wrote:
    >
    > at Mon, 02 Jan 2006 18:52:32 GMT in <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (biig) wrote :
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >AC wrote:
    > >>
    > >> biig wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >I don't like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the
    > >> >clean-up...even
    > >> in a
    > >> > nonstick pan.
    > >>
    > >> if your eggs are dry and brown when you get done cooking them then
    > >> you're likely using too much heat...

    > >
    > > I don't have a problem making scrambled eggs the way I like them...I
    > >was mostly referring to some I've had at restaurants.

    >
    > IME the issues with restaurant scrambled eggs have to do with them commonly
    > cooking them over a griddle. This isn't IMHO a good idea. The griddle is
    > too hot and furthermore has open sides. In addition they're "stirring" with
    > a metal spatula, not with a spoon. The overall result is what I call
    > "chopped omelette".
    >
    > My way to do scrambled eggs is in a pot with high sides (which traps
    > moisture) over medium-low heat and stirring with a spoon. You want to stir
    > relatively frequently although not like a madman. So slower pace than for
    > instance for custard.
    >
    > I've also found that a regular (not non-stick) pot also works slightly
    > better because butter or other fat tends to pool in a non-stick pot and
    > inhibit good even cooking across the bottom. Furthermore it's difficult to
    > get a good scraping action with a spoon without risking the finish on the
    > pot no matter what, so non-stick is usually out for this application.


    I use a silicone spatula. But it does move the butter off the pan and
    therefore, that's why the eggs stick a bit...nothing serious, but a bit.


    > Nonstick is better for omelettes - which again to some degree means that
    > even in the home a lot of people are basically recreating chopped omelette
    > when they try to make scrambled egg
     
  11. BoboBonobo

    BoboBonobo Guest

    Elaine Parrish wrote:
    > On Mon, 2 Jan 2006, AC wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > biig wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > >I don't like my scr. eggs dry and brown and don't like the clean-up...even

    > > in a
    > > > nonstick pan.

    > >
    > > if your eggs are dry and brown when you get done cooking them then you're
    > > likely using too much heat. if the eggs are sticking to the nonstick pan,
    > > you may not have enough fat in the pan. cook them gently and use some butter
    > > in the pan and you'll have light fluffy eggs and clean up will be much
    > > easier too.
    > >

    >
    > I totally agree. What are you guys doing to those eggs??? Just like
    > anything else, there is a "done", a "well done" and a cremated.
    >
    > Cooking too fast is the main reason for "dry" and cremated is the reason
    > for brown.
    >
    > If you let your pan get too hot before you put in the eggs, they will sear
    > and brown.
    >
    > Using a non-stick pan does not eliminate the need for fat in the pan. I
    > use butter. I also use cooking spray, sometimes. Warm the pan, allowing
    > the butter to melt and drop in the eggs. The more you "mash" them up, the
    > dryer they will be because you are breaking the egg in to tiny bits and
    > each "bit" is drying out faster. Don't overwork them in the pan.
    >
    > After scrambling, I clean up my non-stick pan with a paper towel.
    >

    I do it exactly like that except I'm sure I use more butter and I do
    work the egss pretty much with a plasticware fork. The key is low
    heat. Eggs in general are not easy, but they're the single most
    important food.

    > Elaine, too


    --Bryan
     
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