Scramblers & Quad Bikes

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by AC, Sep 12, 2004.

  1. AC

    AC Guest

    Can someone tell me if it illegal for these to be on the mountains? . My
    local hill - Y Domen Fawr - is being ruined by the use of these and 4 wheel
    drive vehicles and I was moaning to someone the other day and they said
    public access is public access (whatever that means?)

    He is a biker by the way.
     
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  2. Paul Upham

    Paul Upham Guest

    They are certainly "legal" in some areas. For example, the Quantock Hills
    in Somerset allow them. All the ancient cattle droves over the hills are
    open for public access.

    Drives me mad though and the rutting/erosion caused by them is atrocious.

    PU
     
  3. NC

    NC Guest

    AC wrote:
    > Can someone tell me if it illegal for these to be on the mountains? .
    > My local hill - Y Domen Fawr - is being ruined by the use of these
    > and 4 wheel drive vehicles and I was moaning to someone the other
    > day and they said public access is public access (whatever that
    > means?)
    >
    > He is a biker by the way.


    Rights of way rules generally apply;
    If there are vehicular rights over a route, then they are legal on that
    route. But, legal means they must be licensed, carry numberplates, VED, MOT,
    insurance, road-legal silencers, etc.
    Those wanting vehicular access attempt to show that a particular route
    supported traffic in the past (eg. horse drawn cart in 19th century), and
    thus claim those rights for vehicles now. The government has said it will
    close this mechanism to designate routes for vehicles.
    Rights of way come in different types;
    foot only,
    foot, horse and cycle,
    foot, horse, cycle and motorised vehicles.
    You can check rights of way on the county council definitive maps.

    If the landowner permits vehicles on his land, then that's the landowner's
    perogative (subject to a few planning constraints and local bylaws).


    If you want to complain, try the local authority and the local police; they
    should deal with the problem if they have any time left after dealing with
    all their other priorities.


    The "right to roam / public access" legislation coming into force in some
    bits of England and Wales is a right on foot only.
    Scottish laws are different, but the new Scottish access laws are for foot
    only.


    - Nigel
    --
    NC - Webmaster for http://www.2mm.org.uk/
    Replies to newsgroup postings to the newsgroup please.
     
  4. druidh

    druidh Guest

    "NC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > AC wrote:
    > > Can someone tell me if it illegal for these to be on the mountains? .
    > > My local hill - Y Domen Fawr - is being ruined by the use of these
    > > and 4 wheel drive vehicles and I was moaning to someone the other
    > > day and they said public access is public access (whatever that
    > > means?)
    > >
    > > He is a biker by the way.

    >
    > Rights of way rules generally apply;
    > If there are vehicular rights over a route, then they are legal on that
    > route. But, legal means they must be licensed, carry numberplates, VED,

    MOT,
    > insurance, road-legal silencers, etc.
    > Those wanting vehicular access attempt to show that a particular route
    > supported traffic in the past (eg. horse drawn cart in 19th century), and
    > thus claim those rights for vehicles now. The government has said it will
    > close this mechanism to designate routes for vehicles.
    > Rights of way come in different types;
    > foot only,
    > foot, horse and cycle,
    > foot, horse, cycle and motorised vehicles.
    > You can check rights of way on the county council definitive maps.
    >
    > If the landowner permits vehicles on his land, then that's the landowner's
    > perogative (subject to a few planning constraints and local bylaws).
    >
    >
    > If you want to complain, try the local authority and the local police;

    they
    > should deal with the problem if they have any time left after dealing with
    > all their other priorities.
    >
    >
    > The "right to roam / public access" legislation coming into force in some
    > bits of England and Wales is a right on foot only.
    > Scottish laws are different, but the new Scottish access laws are for foot
    > only.
    >


    well - horse, cycle and boat too!


    druidh
     
  5. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, AC
    <[email protected]> writes
    >Can someone tell me if it illegal for these to be on the mountains? . My
    >local hill - Y Domen Fawr - is being ruined by the use of these and 4 wheel
    >drive vehicles and I was moaning to someone the other day and they said
    >public access is public access (whatever that means?)
    >
    >He is a biker by the way.
    >
    >


    If you go to Fan-y-Big or Cribyn via the "Roman Road" AKA the Gap Road,
    you will find that it is "Open" now - it is closed to vehicular traffic
    at certain times of the year.

    4x4 vehicles use it and churn it up to an absolute quagmire in one place
    near Neuadd Reservoir.
    --
    Bill Grey
    http://www.billboy.co.uk
     
  6. On Sun, 12 Sep 2004 15:21:08 +0000 (UTC), "AC"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Can someone tell me if it illegal for these to be on the mountains?


    Be aware that most, if not all, hill farmers use quad bikes on the
    hills and it is of course completely legitimate. The other weekend I
    was passed by 3 gamekeepers on quad bikes on part of the Nidderdale
    way. I also know a shepherd who runs sheep on the Moelwyns, Moel Hebog
    and Cnict who regularly used to use his enduro bike in the course of
    his work - as well as a quad bike.

    Someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but the landowner can also give
    permission to people to use his land. My shepherd friend regularly
    hosted trails events on his land - which really used to make me angry
    as they used a patch of ancient oak woodland. So folk could be tearing
    up the moors entirely legitimately, if they've the landowners
    permission. Dosn't give them the right to rip up footpaths or
    bridleways tho....

    Cheers 'n' Beers
     
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