Scraps Soup ?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by <Rj>, Feb 19, 2004.

  1. <Rj>

    <Rj> Guest

    I'd read that little is wasted in a commercial restaurant, ie; vegetable scraps used to make a
    vegetable stock. so Last week, instead of tossing the cauliflower and broccoli stalks; I diced them,
    and cooked in some water with a few chicken bullion cubes. Then, used a stick blender to make a
    puree. Tossed in a few black beans from the freezer, and a handful of "frozen california veggies"
    Simmered, and added a pat of butter, ( for the cholesterol )

    Not only did it look good, it tasted great !

    And to think that all these years I've been tossing these stems in the garbage can.

    BTW; I soak, pre-cook, and freeze bags of black beans, white beans, and garbanzos. It's really
    convenient when I want to add "just a handful" to a soup or salad.

    <rj
     
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  2. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 21:19:13 -0500, "<RJ>" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Last week, instead of tossing the cauliflower and broccoli stalks; I diced them, and cooked in some
    >water with a few chicken bullion cubes. Then, used a stick blender to make a puree. Tossed in a few
    >black beans from the freezer, and a handful of "frozen california veggies" Simmered, and added a
    >pat of butter, ( for the cholesterol )
    >
    >Not only did it look good, it tasted great !

    You can also puree and then return to the pot with cream to heat.

    I don't deal with cauliflower, but peeled broccoli stalks, sliced thin, make very decorative
    additions to stir-fry.

    >I soak, pre-cook, and freeze bags of black beans, white beans, and garbanzos. It's really
    >convenient when I want to add "just a handful" to a soup or salad.

    Sounds like an excellent idea.
     
  3. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >I'd read that little is wasted in a commercial restaurant, ie; vegetable scraps used to make a
    >vegetable stock. so Last week, instead of tossing the cauliflower and broccoli stalks; I diced
    >them, and cooked in some water with a few chicken bullion cubes. Then, used a stick blender to make
    >a puree. Tossed in a few black beans from the freezer, and a handful of "frozen california veggies"
    >Simmered, and added a pat of butter, ( for the cholesterol )
    >
    >Not only did it look good, it tasted great !
    >
    >And to think that all these years I've been tossing these stems in the garbage can.
    >
    I work one evening a week in the kitchen of an organization similar to Meals on Wheels that delivers
    meals to seniors, AIDs patients and others who are house bound.

    Last week we had six cases of broccoli to trim - they wanted to use the florets for a vegetable dish
    of some sort.

    I was absolutely horrified, however, when we were told just to toss the stalks. Seriously, there
    could have been broccoli soup for literally *hundreds*. If I'd had a car, I'd have packed them all
    up and brought them to the local soup kitchen, which I'm sure could have made use of them.

    I am still so annoyed by this, that it's making me rethink my commitment to them.
    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist hopes they are.

    To reply, remove the SPAM BLOCK
     
  4. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 20:29:36 GMT, Donna Rose
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] says...

    >>I'd read that little is wasted in a commercial restaurant, ie; vegetable scraps used to make a
    >>vegetable stock. so...
    <snip>
    >>
    >I work one evening a week in the kitchen of an organization similar to Meals on Wheels that
    >delivers meals to seniors, AIDs patients and others who are house bound.
    >
    >Last week we had six cases of broccoli to trim - they wanted to use the florets for a vegetable
    >dish of some sort.
    >
    >I was absolutely horrified, however, when we were told just to toss the stalks. Seriously, there
    >could have been broccoli soup for literally *hundreds*.

    >I am still so annoyed by this, that it's making me rethink my commitment to them.

    Don't. They need you. Wasted food is a scandal, but sometimes transportation, storing, preprartion,
    and serving (not to mention litigation) makes it easier for the home cook to be thrifty and
    meticulous in a way a larger operation can't. Particularly when it depends on random gifts of
    ingredients. Chopping off the florets for salad or simple steaming is pretty quick and simple.
    Trimming the bottoms and chopping the stems (I peel mine first), making a broth, etc., is a lot more
    trouble. Perhaps you can figure out a practical way for this kitchen to save scraps for a day or 2
    and make soup a feature.

    (I'm always thinking 'compost' when throwing away any vegetable material is mentioned, but that also
    involves transportation, labor, separating compostable discards from others, etc.)
     
  5. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    <RJ> wrote:
    > I'd read that little is wasted in a commercial restaurant, ie; vegetable scraps used to make a
    > vegetable stock. so Last week, instead of tossing the cauliflower and broccoli stalks; I diced
    > them, and cooked in some water with a few chicken bullion cubes. Then, used a stick blender to
    > make a puree. Tossed in a few black beans from the freezer, and a handful of "frozen california
    > veggies" Simmered, and added a pat of butter, ( for the cholesterol )
    >
    > Not only did it look good, it tasted great !
    >
    > And to think that all these years I've been tossing these stems in the garbage can. <rj>

    Now you know how to make veggie stock. If you hadn't pureed it, you could have strained it after
    cooking all that down and had a nice clear vegetable stock. I don't see where you added salt and
    pepper; I would have done that too. Congrats!

    Jill
     
  6. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Donna Rose wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> I'd read that little is wasted in a commercial restaurant, ie; vegetable scraps used to make a
    >> vegetable stock.
    (snip)
    >> Not only did it look good, it tasted great !
    >>
    >> And to think that all these years I've been tossing these stems in the garbage can.
    >>
    > I work one evening a week in the kitchen of an organization similar to Meals on Wheels that
    > delivers meals to seniors, AIDs patients and others who are house bound.
    >
    > Last week we had six cases of broccoli to trim - they wanted to use the florets for a vegetable
    > dish of some sort.
    >
    > I was absolutely horrified, however, when we were told just to toss the stalks.
    (snip)
    > I am still so annoyed by this, that it's making me rethink my commitment to them.

    Donna, don't give up your committment to them. I have worked in a number of restaurants over the
    years where I saw so much waste - hundreds of baked potatoes being tossed out; the same sort of
    thing you're talking about. I was appalled. But I was told it is the Dept. of Health which require
    this. They don't want "spoiled food" being given to soup kitchens, shelters and other subsidized
    agencies. There is always the threat of the food not being handled properly and an outbreak of food
    poisoning. Okay... how often? ... never mind!

    Don't give up what you're doing based on that. You're doing a good thing.

    Jill
     
  7. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 20:29:36 GMT, Donna Rose <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >[email protected] says...
    >
    > >>I'd read that little is wasted in a commercial restaurant, ie; vegetable scraps used to make a
    > >>vegetable stock. so...
    > <snip>
    > >>
    > >I work one evening a week in the kitchen of an organization similar to Meals on Wheels that
    > >delivers meals to seniors, AIDs patients and others who are house bound.
    > >
    > >Last week we had six cases of broccoli to trim - they wanted to use the florets for a vegetable
    > >dish of some sort.
    > >
    > >I was absolutely horrified, however, when we were told just to toss the stalks. Seriously, there
    > >could have been broccoli soup for literally *hundreds*.
    >
    > >I am still so annoyed by this, that it's making me rethink my commitment to them.
    >
    > Don't. They need you. Wasted food is a scandal, but sometimes transportation, storing,
    > preprartion, and serving (not to mention litigation) makes it easier for the home cook to be
    > thrifty and meticulous in a way a larger operation can't. Particularly when it depends on random
    > gifts of ingredients. Chopping off the florets for salad or simple steaming is pretty quick and
    > simple. Trimming the bottoms and chopping the stems (I peel mine first), making a broth, etc., is
    > a lot more trouble. Perhaps you can figure out a practical way for this kitchen to save scraps for
    > a day or 2 and make soup a feature.

    I agree that food waste should be minimized, but it is an error to think that waste of food has any
    but the most tenuous connection to people going hungry. There is more than enough food to feed
    everyone - that some people go hungry is the result of distribution, income, transportation, and
    other factors. Reminds me of an old joke:

    Jewish mother (to young son): Finish your broccoli - don't you know that children in Africa are
    going hungry? Son: Give me an envelope and I'll send it to them.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  8. Kswck

    Kswck Guest

    > I work one evening a week in the kitchen of an organization similar to Meals on Wheels that
    > delivers meals to seniors, AIDs patients and others who are house bound.
    >
    > Last week we had six cases of broccoli to trim - they wanted to use the florets for a vegetable
    > dish of some sort.
    >
    > I was absolutely horrified, however, when we were told just to toss the stalks. Seriously, there
    > could have been broccoli soup for literally *hundreds*. If I'd had a car, I'd have packed them all
    > up and brought them to the local soup kitchen, which I'm sure could have made use of them.
    >
    > I am still so annoyed by this, that it's making me rethink my commitment to them.
    > --
    > Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist hopes they are.
    >

    Actually, if you just peel the stalks and serve them on a veggie platter, many people will like it,
    even if they don't know what it is.
     
  9. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Wasted food is a scandal, but sometimes transportation, storing, preprartion, and serving (not to
    > mention litigation) makes it easier for the home cook to be thrifty and meticulous in a way a
    > larger operation can't. Particularly when it depends on random gifts of ingredients. Chopping off
    > the florets for salad or simple steaming is pretty quick and simple. Trimming the bottoms and
    > chopping the stems (I peel mine first), making a broth, etc., is a lot more trouble. Perhaps you
    > can figure out a practical way for this kitchen to save scraps for a day or 2 and make soup a
    > feature.
    >
    >
    I've thought about this more since my original post on the matter.. This is not a soup kitchen, but
    a place that prepares meals for pick-up or home delivery. In all the time I've worked there, I've
    never seen a soup product made. I think because it just wouldn't travel well.

    The waste just shocked me. I had always understood that nothing was ever wasted in a
    professional kitchen.

    By the way, very little of their food comes from donations. They purchase almost everything, so they
    can be assured of ample supplies on an uninterrupted basis. Their donations come in the form of
    money, not actual food items.

    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist hopes they are.

    To reply, remove the SPAM BLOCK
     
  10. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> I work one evening a week in the kitchen of an organization similar to Meals on Wheels that
    >> delivers meals to seniors, AIDs patients and others who are house bound.
    >>
    >> Last week we had six cases of broccoli to trim - they wanted to use the florets for a vegetable
    >> dish of some sort.
    >>
    >> I was absolutely horrified, however, when we were told just to toss the stalks.
    >(snip)
    >> I am still so annoyed by this, that it's making me rethink my commitment to them.
    >
    >Donna, don't give up your committment to them. I have worked in a number of restaurants over the
    >years where I saw so much waste - hundreds of baked potatoes being tossed out; the same sort of
    >thing you're talking about. I was appalled. But I was told it is the Dept. of Health which require
    >this. They don't want "spoiled food" being given to soup kitchens, shelters and other subsidized
    >agencies. There is always the threat of the food not being handled properly and an outbreak of food
    >poisoning. Okay... how often? ... never mind!
    >
    >Don't give up what you're doing based on that. You're doing a good thing.
    >
    Thanks Jill. It feels good to work there. I think I was just over reacting to what I saw as a
    tremendous waste of resources. Having thought about it more, I think it's probably just a logistics
    thing. I do intend to stay on.
    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist hopes they are.

    To reply, remove the SPAM BLOCK
     
  11. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 06:01:29 GMT, Donna Rose
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] says...

    >> Wasted food is a scandal, but sometimes transportation, storing, preprartion, and serving (not to
    >> mention litigation) makes it easier for the home cook to be thrifty and meticulous in a way a
    >> larger operation can't.
    >>
    >I've thought about this more since my original post on the matter.. This is not a soup kitchen, but
    >a place that prepares meals for pick-up or home delivery. In all the time I've worked there, I've
    >never seen a soup product made. I think because it just wouldn't travel well.
    >
    >The waste just shocked me. I had always understood that nothing was ever wasted in a
    >professional kitchen.

    Can you ask the Person in Charge? Not why they waste the broccoli, but why they don't make any soup?
    The menus that appear in my newspaper for the Sr. Citizens' Center look pretty much like opening
    cans and packages, and heating up. Quick prep and little storage of leftovers. Not a great deal of
    "home cooking." And no soup. Very similar to a school cafeteria. Monday's menu of "American Chop
    Suey"(?) and Tuesday's of "fish square" are not very inspiring.
     
  12. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >Can you ask the Person in Charge? Not why they waste the broccoli, but why they don't make any
    >soup? The menus that appear in my newspaper for the Sr. Citizens' Center look pretty much like
    >opening cans and packages, and heating up. Quick prep and little storage of leftovers. Not a great
    >deal of "home cooking." And no soup. Very similar to a school cafeteria. Monday's menu of "American
    >Chop Suey"(?) and Tuesday's of "fish square" are not very inspiring.
    >
    >
    The food I've seen prepared here is good, nutritious, home-cooked type food, not cafeteria style by
    any means. It is all frozen in individual sized portions for home delivery, with seven meals
    delivered to each household each week. I did ask why we weren't saving the stalks for soup, but
    didn't actually receive an answer other than "no, we don't want them, just toss them". I'll see if I
    can get to the bottom of this next week.
    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist hopes they are.

    To reply, remove the SPAM BLOCK
     
  13. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Donna Rose wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> Can you ask the Person in Charge? Not why they waste the broccoli, but why they don't make any
    >> soup? The menus that appear in my newspaper for the Sr. Citizens' Center look pretty much like
    >> opening cans and packages, and heating up. Quick prep and little storage of leftovers. Not a
    >> great deal of "home cooking." And no soup. Very similar to a school cafeteria. Monday's menu of
    >> "American Chop Suey"(?) and Tuesday's of "fish square" are not very inspiring.
    >>
    >>
    > The food I've seen prepared here is good, nutritious, home-cooked type food, not cafeteria style
    > by any means. It is all frozen in individual sized portions for home delivery, with seven meals
    > delivered to each household each week. I did ask why we weren't saving the stalks for soup, but
    > didn't actually receive an answer other than "no, we don't want them, just toss them". I'll see if
    > I can get to the bottom of this next week.

    My dad and his sister arranged for my paternal grandmother to have "meals on wheels" delivered. They
    tried to bring her some healthy food as she was literally a shut-in and starving herself to death.
    She said she didn't "like" them and wouldn't eat. Then they tried to have a care-giver come stay
    with her. She didn't "like" them, either.

    God Bless you for what you are doing. Grandma didn't "like" anyone, and because of that she died
    much sooner than she should have.

    Jill
     
  14. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    jmcquown wrote:

    > My dad and his sister arranged for my paternal grandmother to have "meals on wheels" delivered.
    > They tried to bring her some healthy food as she was literally a shut-in and starving herself to
    > death. She said she didn't "like" them and wouldn't eat. Then they tried to have a care-giver come
    > stay with her. She didn't "like" them, either.
    >
    > God Bless you for what you are doing. Grandma didn't "like" anyone, and because of that she died
    > much sooner than she should have.

    My sister in law's mother is one of the sweetest women you could ever know. She is almost 90 and her
    physical and mental health has been slipping. She didn't like the people bringing her Meals On
    Wheels. My SIL would order them and then her mother would make her cancel them. Within a week she
    would be in the ER with her heart pounding away at close to 200 beats per minute because her
    electrolytes were all out of balance. She was almost starving to death because she didn't get hungry
    and could not remember if she had eaten.

    SIL ended up putting her mother in a very nice "home" . The mother is furious about it. She calls
    from the "home" once or twice a week and yells and screams at SIL , then calls back a few hours
    later to apologize.

    Growing old is a bitch.
     
  15. Blake Murphy

    Blake Murphy Guest

    On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 12:32:03 GMT, Frogleg <[email protected]>
    wrote:\
    >I don't deal with cauliflower, but peeled broccoli stalks, sliced thin, make very decorative
    >additions to stir-fry.
    >
    try marinating them briefly (while you cut up the rest of the stuff) in rice vinegar. it adds
    another dimension.

    your pal, blake
     
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