Sealed bottom bracket ??s'

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ken C. M., May 6, 2006.

  1. Ken C. M.

    Ken C. M. Guest

    A few questions about these.
    (1) Whats the average life span?
    (2) Are more or less durable than conventional bbs'
    (3) are they hard to replace?

    On my last couple of rides I noticed a sort of crunching / grinding
    noise. So last night I took it for a ride and really listened for where
    it was coming from. It's definately the drivetrain somewhere. Most
    noticeable when appling power to the pedals to sprint. I checked it all
    over when I got home. Cleaned every thing, and checked the bb for play I
    couldn't feel any, in the bb, or anywhere else in the drive train.

    I read a couple of old threads here:
    http://groups.google.com/group/rec....nching+bottom+bracket&rnum=1#9805e67f288d0964

    and here:
    http://groups.google.com/group/rec....nching+bottom+bracket&rnum=2#27e898d15161f948

    And from what I have read it sounds like my bb is toast.
    Whats the opinions?

    Oh yeah and the bike is a Raleigh and has about 3300 miles on it. 1200
    loaded touring and the rest commuting and rec riding.

    Ken
    -
    New cycling jersey: $49
    new cycling shorts: $39
    Not being a slave to the petrol pump: priceless.
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Ken C. M." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >A few questions about these.
    > (1) Whats the average life span?


    I'm guessing variable. I replaced one on my winter bike (Raleigh SC40) after
    maybe 1500 miles, possibly due to road salt. The replacement has about
    11,000 miles on it and seems fine even though it gets the same salty roads
    each winter. When I've inquired of others (I think on the "Icebike" list)
    I've run into other people who've had these go out in a relatively short
    time.

    > (2) Are more or less durable than conventional bbs'


    You mean the ones you just take apart, put grease in, and put back together?
    Never had one fail, so can't answer the question.

    > (3) are they hard to replace?


    Pretty easy. Get a new one from your bike shop, take off the cranks, take
    old one out and put new one in. Put cranks back on. You need some
    specialized tools such as a crank extractor; I've got one of those cheap $40
    kits with a bunch of bike tools and everything I needed was in that.
     
  3. Ken C. M. wrote:
    > A few questions about these.
    > (1) Whats the average life span?


    Depends but pretty long

    > (2) Are more or less durable than conventional bbs'


    Ti=ough to say, a conventional BB when serviced regularly will last for
    years and years-I use one from 1988.

    > (3) are they hard to replace?


    Nope, spline tool.
    >
    > On my last couple of rides I noticed a sort of crunching / grinding
    > noise. So last night I took it for a ride and really listened for where
    > it was coming from. It's definately the drivetrain somewhere. Most
    > noticeable when appling power to the pedals to sprint. I checked it all
    > over when I got home. Cleaned every thing, and checked the bb for play I
    > couldn't feel any, in the bb, or anywhere else in the drive train.
    >
    > I read a couple of old threads here:
    > http://groups.google.com/group/rec....nching+bottom+bracket&rnum=1#9805e67f288d0964
    >
    > and here:
    > http://groups.google.com/group/rec....nching+bottom+bracket&rnum=2#27e898d15161f948
    >
    > And from what I have read it sounds like my bb is toast.
    > Whats the opinions?


    Take the crank off and turn the spindle with your fingers. If it feels
    like it's full of sand, replace. If smooth, take out, take both cups
    off, clean, then grease well..inside cups as well.
     
  4. Replaced a square spindle bb off of Sora setup after 20,000 miles, and
    it was in great shape. I upgraded it to a 9 speed so I had to change the
    BB. Have an ultegra bb that is just now starting to show some wear at
    19,000 miles. Wear I ride, it hardly rains (Arizona).
     
  5. Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:

    > Take the crank off and turn the spindle with your fingers. If it feels
    > like it's full of sand, replace. If smooth, take out, take both cups
    > off, clean, then grease well..inside cups as well.


    Taje *BOTH* cups off? Not just the adjustable (left) cup? Is this
    something "new" to splined (as opposed to pin-wrench and cursing)
    bottom brackets?

    - Confused amateur.
     
  6. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

    "Brian Huntley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    >
    >> Take the crank off and turn the spindle with your fingers. If it feels
    >> like it's full of sand, replace. If smooth, take out, take both cups
    >> off, clean, then grease well..inside cups as well.

    >
    > Taje *BOTH* cups off? Not just the adjustable (left) cup? Is this
    > something "new" to splined (as opposed to pin-wrench and cursing)
    > bottom brackets?
    >
    > - Confused amateur.
    >
    >


    Yes, both. The idea is to grease the threads.
     
  7. Ken C. M.

    Ken C. M. Guest

    Ken C. M. wrote:

    In response to my own message. I did a much better job of cleaning the
    bike, and then re lubed everything, and after a couple of miles of
    riding the noise seems to have disappeared.

    My only guess on this is that there was dirt / road grime built up
    someplace that I should have been paying more attention to.

    Any comments of the disappearance of the noise?

    Ken
    -
    New cycling jersey: $49
    new cycling shorts: $39
    Not being a slave to the petrol pump: priceless.
     
  8. Brian Huntley wrote:
    > Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    >
    > > Take the crank off and turn the spindle with your fingers. If it feels
    > > like it's full of sand, replace. If smooth, take out, take both cups
    > > off, clean, then grease well..inside cups as well.

    >
    > Taje *BOTH* cups off? Not just the adjustable (left) cup? Is this
    > something "new" to splined (as opposed to pin-wrench and cursing)
    > bottom brackets?
    >
    > - Confused amateur.


    The onlder UN-51 and UN-72 type could have the right cup tapped off and
    grease added. I have fixed dozens of creaky BBs by doing this as most
    bike shops didn't know the right cup will come off. NOW, splined and
    UN-53/73...right cup is integrated, so it won't creak anyway.
     
  9. >
    > In response to my own message. I did a much better job of cleaning the
    > bike, and then re lubed everything, and after a couple of miles of
    > riding the noise seems to have disappeared.
    >
    > My only guess on this is that there was dirt / road grime built up
    > someplace that I should have been paying more attention to.
    >
    > Any comments of the disappearance of the noise?


    The first place I look is the pedals. Clicking sounds usually mean you
    have to regrease the threads on your pedals. That's been my experience.
    The weirdest noise to locate, I had, was something flapping on my helmet, I
    could have sworn it was coming from the bike. Noise from a bike is one the
    most myterious things, in that it is sometimes so hard to locate. But there
    are tests, like pedaling standing up (saddle), pedaling one footed, each
    foot (pedals, BB), coasting (wheels), pulling on the handlebars or barely
    holding the bar (stem), etc. Usually with tests like that you can figure it
    out.
     
  10. On Sat, 06 May 2006 08:13:37 -0400, Ken C. M. wrote:

    > A few questions about these.
    > (1) Whats the average life span?


    This is variable -- depending on model and exposure to water. My road
    bike has about 15,000 miles on one. Before that, I did have one go bad in
    fewer miles.

    > (2) Are more or less durable than conventional bbs'


    Cup and cone bottom brackets are a major maintenance item. They have to
    be re-packed at least every year, and often mid-season as well. They will
    last a long time if properly cared for and if they don't get too much
    water.

    > (3) are they hard to replace?


    Nah.

    Cartridge bottom brackets are cheap and convenient. The labor savings is
    worth a lot more than they cost.

    >
    > On my last couple of rides I noticed a sort of crunching / grinding
    > noise. So last night I took it for a ride and really listened for where
    > it was coming from. It's definately the drivetrain somewhere. Most
    > noticeable when appling power to the pedals to sprint.


    This sort of noise can be hard to diagnose. It might be the bottom
    bracket, but you don't have much mileage on it. How about the chain?
    Derailleur?

    You can go ahead and replace the bottom bracket. See if it helps. If so,
    chalk it up to bad luck and go one. If not, swap the old one back in and
    keep looking for the source of the problem. Meanwhile, your new bottom
    bracket is there when you need it.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all
    _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so
    (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am
    nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     
  11. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Callistus Valerius wrote:

    >>
    >> In response to my own message. I did a much better job of cleaning the
    >> bike, and then re lubed everything, and after a couple of miles of
    >> riding the noise seems to have disappeared.
    >>
    >> My only guess on this is that there was dirt / road grime built up
    >> someplace that I should have been paying more attention to.
    >>
    >> Any comments of the disappearance of the noise?

    >
    > The first place I look is the pedals. Clicking sounds usually mean
    > you
    > have to regrease the threads on your pedals. That's been my experience.
    > The weirdest noise to locate, I had, was something flapping on my helmet,
    > I
    > could have sworn it was coming from the bike. Noise from a bike is one
    > the
    > most myterious things, in that it is sometimes so hard to locate. But
    > there are tests, like pedaling standing up (saddle), pedaling one footed,
    > each foot (pedals, BB), coasting (wheels), pulling on the handlebars or
    > barely
    > holding the bar (stem), etc. Usually with tests like that you can figure
    > it out.


    Funny this should pop up. I was out for about 25 miles on Sunday and had a
    clicking sound on about every other go around of the cranks. After trying
    different gears, standing on it, and just some zero effort go arounds I
    found the noise.

    My shoelace was hitting the water bottle cage and the plastic tip make a
    'tink' when it hit.

    I stopped and re-laced and back to silent running.

    Better something funny than something broken.

    Bill Baka
     
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