Seasonal tune up ideas

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Boberto, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. Boberto

    Boberto New Member

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    Greetings All!

    Newbie road biker here and with spring around the corner and hopefully no more snow in Minnesota, I'm excited to hit the roads/paths for the first time (in a long time). I purchased a bike that was sitting in someone's closet and it needs some TLC, so I was hoping to do most of it myself rather than paying the local bike shops $180+ for a seasonal tune up. I did do some googling but I'm not savvy on the terms so of course I ended up with motorcycle stuff, 'cycling' which could go down completely the wrong path, etc... and just not good resources.

    Any information would be greatly appreciated!
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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  3. rz3300

    rz3300 Member

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    The two main things that I make sure to do is the clean my bike, like really really clean it, and make it look as new as possible, and I always inspect the brakes. I have gotten pretty good at looking at my brakes and diagnosing and fixing any issues, and it usually does not require anything more than that. I try to avoid the shop, but sometimes that is just not possible.
     
  4. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Around here a basic tune-up costs around $69-80. That generally includes adjusting shifting, brakes, hubs, and headset, a general exterior cleaning, lubing the chain, and non-invasive wheel truing. New parts and any procedure that requires removing components other than wheels would be extra.

    If you've got basic tools, desire to learn, and are detail-oriented, you can do most of this yourself.
     
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