Seasoning a Wok - How to???

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Nov 29, 2005.

  1. Hello,

    I just got a carbon steel wok and have been reading up on how to season
    one, but the techniques vary and NONE of them explain how the wok
    should look after the process, so I am terribly confused.

    I have attempted to season my wok once already. What resulted was a
    black oily looking finish. I cooked a meal using it and it turned out
    just fine, but some of the food particles stuck to the wok. So,
    following the instructions of a web, I tried to season it again, this
    time, I managed to burn off a hole in the black oily looking finish;
    maybe I used a bit too much heat. Now I'm not sure what I should do.
    Should I reseason the thing again? Does the black oily finish sound
    like it was properly seasoned the first time?

    Thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > I just got a carbon steel wok and have been reading up on how to season
    > one.


    Cookware seasoning is a mystical/hocus pocus endeavor adhered to by
    those whose goal is to display a designer kitchenful of paraphenalia
    that charades as appearing that they can cook when actually they cannot
    cook a lick

    Do you really think the local Chinese Take-Out cooks waste their time
    reading about wok seasoning... hell no... with a fistful of fatty pork
    they can fully season any wok in under five minutes... they're born
    knowing how.

    Won't be ten minutes a passle of kitchen imbeciles will be along with
    all kinds of fercocktah hocus pocus scientifics about seasoning, like
    roasting woks in an oven... didja ever see a chinky kitchen with a
    friggin' oven, of course not.

    I don't want to see you here again... if you return with this seasoning
    crapola I'm going to personally shove dem bamboo chop sticks up your
    b-hind, sideways.

    Stop reading. Start cooking.

    Sheldon
     
  3. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello,
    >
    > I just got a carbon steel wok and have been reading up on how to season
    > one, but the techniques vary and NONE of them explain how the wok
    > should look after the process, so I am terribly confused.
    >
    > I have attempted to season my wok once already. What resulted was a
    > black oily looking finish. I cooked a meal using it and it turned out
    > just fine, but some of the food particles stuck to the wok. So,
    > following the instructions of a web, I tried to season it again, this
    > time, I managed to burn off a hole in the black oily looking finish;
    > maybe I used a bit too much heat. Now I'm not sure what I should do.
    > Should I reseason the thing again? Does the black oily finish sound
    > like it was properly seasoned the first time?
    >
    > Thanks
    >


    Real wok seasoning develops only with prolonged use but you can get it
    started with a thorough cleaning, drying, coating with oil, then heating.
    The finish is black, or almost black. Do not expewct true non-stick. The
    seasoning helps a lot but there still will be some sticking particularly as
    you learn how to adjust the temp properly.


    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  4. wff_ng_7

    wff_ng_7 Guest

    "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Real wok seasoning develops only with prolonged use but you can get it
    > started with a thorough cleaning, drying, coating with oil, then heating.
    > The finish is black, or almost black. Do not expewct true non-stick. The
    > seasoning helps a lot but there still will be some sticking particularly
    > as you learn how to adjust the temp properly.


    I agree with the idea that the real wok seasoning develops through repeated
    use. For me, the initial seasoning is mostly just to get the whole seasoning
    thing started, but also to provide a corrosion protection coating on the
    steel surfaces that never see cooking. That way it won't rust during
    storage.

    In a way the seasoning is more affected by what you don't do rather than by
    what you do. Refraining from excessive cleaning is important... throw away
    the brillo (steel wool) pad and the like. If some small stuff sticks to the
    cooking surface here and there, don't worry about it. Get rid of the big
    stuff of course. Tiny pieces of the cooking surface seasoning coming off in
    a subsequent cooking session isn't going to hurt anyone, and it is doubtful
    it would be noticeable in the food. It's not as if you are cooking a white
    sauce.

    Eventually the seasoned areas of the wok should more or less merge so it
    looks like a more uniform surface. But it will be more concentrated toward
    the bottom of the wok and minimal toward the rim.

    --
    ( #wff_ng_7# at #verizon# period #net# )
     
  5. salgud

    salgud Guest

    wff_ng_7 wrote:
    > "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Real wok seasoning develops only with prolonged use but you can get it
    > > started with a thorough cleaning, drying, coating with oil, then heating.
    > > The finish is black, or almost black. Do not expewct true non-stick. The
    > > seasoning helps a lot but there still will be some sticking particularly
    > > as you learn how to adjust the temp properly.

    >
    > I agree with the idea that the real wok seasoning develops through repeated
    > use. For me, the initial seasoning is mostly just to get the whole seasoning
    > thing started, but also to provide a corrosion protection coating on the
    > steel surfaces that never see cooking. That way it won't rust during
    > storage.
    >
    > In a way the seasoning is more affected by what you don't do rather than by
    > what you do. Refraining from excessive cleaning is important... throw away
    > the brillo (steel wool) pad and the like. If some small stuff sticks to the
    > cooking surface here and there, don't worry about it. Get rid of the big
    > stuff of course. Tiny pieces of the cooking surface seasoning coming off in
    > a subsequent cooking session isn't going to hurt anyone, and it is doubtful
    > it would be noticeable in the food. It's not as if you are cooking a white
    > sauce.
    >
    > Eventually the seasoned areas of the wok should more or less merge so it
    > looks like a more uniform surface. But it will be more concentrated toward
    > the bottom of the wok and minimal toward the rim.
    >
    > --
    > ( #wff_ng_7# at #verizon# period #net# )


    I've been cooking in a wok (not the same one) for over 30 years. I've
    seasoned more than a few. I'm not going to repeat the procedure again
    here. If you want to know specifically how I do it, Google in this NG
    and find one of several previous posts on this exact topic (also
    related to seasoning cast iron, which I do the same way). If you have
    any questions after you read one of those posts, I'll be happy to
    answer them. It's very easy, and works very well.
     
  6. cschoner

    cschoner Guest

    Just wipe it down with a light coat of cooking oil and turn it upside
    down over a burner on medium high heat for about 10-15 minutes. Let it
    cool down, and you are done.

    After using the wok, clean it using a very mild soap solution - no
    scrubbing or abrasives! Each time you use it, it will grow darker as
    the seasoning thickens. Within a couple of months the wok should be
    completely black.
     
  7. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "cschoner" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > After using the wok, clean it using a very mild soap solution


    I would never use soap myself - just wipe around the inside of the still hot
    wok with oil coated kitchen paper until any major debris is removed, let
    cool then store away. Soaps are used to help emulsify oils, You want oils on
    that wok surface to keep the steel from rusting for one thing.




    Shaun aRe
     
  8. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "cschoner" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > After using the wok, clean it using a very mild soap solution


    I would never use soap myself - just wipe around the inside of the still hot
    wok with oil coated kitchen paper until any major debris is removed, let
    cool then store away. Soaps are used to help emulsify oils, You want oils on
    that wok surface to keep the steel from rusting for one thing.




    Shaun aRe
     
  9. kalanamak

    kalanamak Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hello,
    >


    >

    Personally, I found the baking in the oven business gives a too thick,
    too flakey coating. I start out by deep frying in the wok, and then
    making dishes that require a lot of oil (like eggplant). After some time
    of good greasy cooking on high, like a wok should, PRESTO--seasoned wok.
    If you make meat, all the easier!
    blacksalt
     
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